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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 2, 1995
This'll make you all warm and fuzzy: Baltimore Gas & Electric, which last week announced a merger with Potomac Electric and the movement of its corporate headquarters out of downtown Baltimore, has pledged $50,000 to help fund the Downtown Partnership's "latest business retention and growth initiatives." In press release, a BGE veep is quoted as saying, "This award illustrates BGE's steadfast commitment to the prosperity of downtown Baltimore." YEAH, well . . . And check this out: The Better Business Bureau of Greater Maryland, facing complaints that its tele-marketers use high-pressure sales pitches to recruit new dues-paying members, is offering an award to recognize companies that treat their customers and employees ethically.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
Hundreds of protesters marched through downtown Baltimore on Monday evening to express outrage over the Trayvon Martin case but also to use the teen as a symbol of systemic issues facing the black community in the city and around the country. Several hundred protesters gathered in McKeldin Square next to the Inner Harbor before marching seven blocks to City Hall, shutting down streets during rush-hour traffic. It was the second day of protests in Baltimore after a Florida jury found George Zimmerman not guilty in Martin's death after a trial that captured national attention.
NEWS
By Kirby Fowler, Tom Noonan and Laurie Schwartz | June 9, 2009
Over the past month, a series of reports has made people uneasy about the level of safety in downtown Baltimore. In truth, statistics show that both violent crime and property crime have decreased downtown by 40 percent over the last nine years and that downtown is still one of the safest areas in Baltimore. On any typical day, there are at least 160,000 residents, visitors, and employees in downtown Baltimore, going about their business without incident or interruption. The residential base continues to grow every year, outpacing most other cities and placing Baltimore seventh in the country in terms of the number of residents in a downtown area.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2008
Magna gets loan reprieve Magna Entertainment Corp., which owns Laurel Park and Pimlico Race Course, received a reprieve on loan repayments and more cash. The Canadian company had owed $180 million to parent MI Developments Inc., which has a 59 percent stake in Magna, by the end of the month, and Magna's $40 million line of credit with a bank was due Friday. The bank exteneded its deadline to July 30, and MID to Aug. 31. $550 million in construction Developers completed nearly $550 million in downtown Baltimore construction projects in the first four months of this year.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2000
Downtown Baltimore merchants began their push for a bigger share of this year's Christmas shopping dollars yesterday with a $330,000 advertising campaign they hope will lure shoppers away from area malls. The "Downtown for the Holidays" campaign represents a first for the area, said Michele Whelley, president of Downtown Partnership Inc. The business organization joined with Trigen Energy, American Express, Pepsi-Cola Co. and local and state government to promote downtown Baltimore. "Don't go to a mall in some faraway county cornfield," said Mayor Martin O'Malley yesterday, announcing the effort.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
Sean March has a new job: He's part tour guide, part goodwill ambassador, and the eyes and ears for the city's downtown police officers.Mr. March is one of Baltimore's 35 new Public Safety Guides, who will walk downtown streets starting March 1, report suspicious behavior to police, give directions to lost tourists and get to know merchants.The guides are expected to make downtown Baltimore a safer, friendlier place. They were hired by the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore, a consortium of property owners.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Sun Staff Writer | February 7, 1994
Ninety years ago this morning, approximately on the spot where Walt Disney's World on Ice is currently performing at the Baltimore Arena, somebody dropped a cigarette. Twenty-four hours later, most of downtown Baltimore was gone.Yesterday, a few dozen firefighters and fire buffs gathered beside the arena to commemorate the great fire of 1904, a wind-whipped catastrophe that tore the heart out of the city, leveling 140 acres and 1,500 buildings."It's the history of Baltimore, and the younger generation doesn't know about it," said Francis A. Kemper, 73, a retired Baltimore firefighter who planned yesterday's ceremony.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2014
Dr. Oscar A. Iseri, a retired Veterans Administration pathologist, died April 25 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Lorien Harmony Hall Assisted Living in Columbia. He was 86. The son of Matahichi Iseri and Kisa Iseri, immigrant Japanese farmers, Oscar Akio Iseri was born in Thomas, Wash. During World War II, Dr. Iseri and other members of his family were sent in 1942 to the Pinedale Assembly Center, which was an internment camp for Japanese-Americans, near Fresno, Calif., and later to the Tule Lake Relocation Center in Modoc County, Calif.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1999
For decades, the four-story building in Mount Vernon was used as medical offices -- first by dentists, then psychiatrists.But when it changed hands this year, the building wasn't sold to another doctors' group, or to any other commercial interest.It was purchased by a husband and wife from Washington who are taking it back to its original use: a single-family residence.Although Paul and Susan Warren say they considered many different places to live, they were struck by the grandeur and magnificent appointments of the 32-foot-wide house at 829 Park Avenue, built in the 1870s for the family that ran the Knabe piano factory in southern Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Zaleski and For b | January 22, 2014
For 23 years, Penny Troutner has owned Light Street Cycles in Federal Hill. And she had seen bicycles on Baltimore's streets, for recreation and transportation, even before she opened her bike shop. But Troutner holds up 2011 as the year she noticed drivers giving cyclists in the city more room on the road. It's a year Baltimore's cycling community easily, but regrettably, recalls. In August 2011, 20-year-old Nathan Krasnopoler, the Johns Hopkins University student who suffered brain injuries after colliding with a car that had turned into his lane, died nearly seven months after losing consciousness permanently in February.
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