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NEWS
By Dahleen Glanton and Dahleen Glanton,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 16, 2005
ATLANTA - After listening to hours of heated opposition from homeless people and their advocates yesterday, city officials passed a tough anti-panhandling ordinance that forbids anyone from begging for money in most of downtown. The ordinance, approved 12-3 and backed by Mayor Shirley Franklin, has divided much of the city, with business and civic leaders firmly behind it and several religious and human rights groups opposing it. Opponents call it discriminatory because it will, in effect, ban homeless people from downtown.
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NEWS
By Dahleen Glanton and Dahleen Glanton,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 16, 2005
ATLANTA - After listening to hours of heated opposition from homeless people and their advocates yesterday, city officials passed a tough anti-panhandling ordinance that forbids anyone from begging for money in most of downtown. The ordinance, approved 12-3 and backed by Mayor Shirley Franklin, has divided much of the city, with business and civic leaders firmly behind it and several religious and human rights groups opposing it. Opponents call it discriminatory because it will, in effect, ban homeless people from downtown.
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NEWS
July 19, 1996
THE GLOW IN THE SKY is not Atlanta burning but the gold of the greatest Olympiad with the most athletes in the most events watched by the most people ever. The long preparations, hype, controversies and commercialization are receding in shadow. The athletes' time is at hand.This is the Olympics to which everyone came, reported variously as 10,000 to 16,000 athletes, more than one-third of them women, from 197 nations and non-nations (a dozen more than the U.N.). The Cold War of boycotts and ostracisms is over.
NEWS
July 19, 1996
THE GLOW IN THE SKY is not Atlanta burning but the gold of the greatest Olympiad with the most athletes in the most events watched by the most people ever. The long preparations, hype, controversies and commercialization are receding in shadow. The athletes' time is at hand.This is the Olympics to which everyone came, reported variously as 10,000 to 16,000 athletes, more than one-third of them women, from 197 nations and non-nations (a dozen more than the U.N.). The Cold War of boycotts and ostracisms is over.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Evening Sun Staff | October 11, 1991
ATLANTA -- The giant billboard just off the northbound Connector, a six-lane mega highway that courses through downtown Atlanta, speaks volumes about the state of this city with just one sentence and one symbol.The sentence: "Atlanta Will Never Be A Baseball Town." And the symbol: a huge tomahawk perched directly in the middle of the sentence, making it out to be a lie.For yes, this genteel Southern city resting in the midst of the Confederacy has gone slightly daft over its Braves, who bring their improbable road show home for the middle three games of the National League Championship Series, beginning tomorrow afternoon.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 21, 1991
Stroll around downtown Atlanta and you'll see an incredible number of things that were built about 1864. A century from now, visitors will see an incredible number of things that were built about 1996.The first building boom was necessitated by Civil War Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's infamous March to the Sea, during which he burned this Georgia city to the ground.The current boom is tied to the 1996 Summer Olympics -- an event that appears to be viewed here as having nearly the same import.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Evening Sun Staff | October 22, 1991
ATLANTA -- Even now, with only beams, cables and an outer shell to suggest its future majesty, the Georgia Dome already casts a striking impression on the Atlanta skyline.The hope among local officials here is that the nation's newest indoor playground will leave an equally indelible mark on the sporting world."We've got a lot of great plans for this place," said Khalil A. Johnson, general manager of the facility, located in the heart of downtown Atlanta, just across from the Omni arena and CNN Center.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 16, 1994
The State of Georgia will begin developing a 72-acre Olympic park in downtown Atlanta on a site now occupied largely by distressed residential and commercial properties, despite the protests of residents who would be displaced.At a news conference last week with Mayor Bill Campbell of Atlanta and Olympic officials, Gov. Zell Miller said he had decided to endorse the plan, which was proposed by the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games, the private corporation that will stage the 1996 Olympics.
TRAVEL
By June Sawyers and June Sawyers,Tribune Newspapers | November 8, 2009
'Moon Handbooks: Atlanta' Avalon, $16.95: Georgia might be known as the Peach State, but Atlanta could reasonably be considered the Peachtree city. The word "Peachtree" appears on at least 71 street signs, according to the authors (though the fruit tree is a rare sight within city limits). Then again, as capital of the so-called New South, Atlanta has always done things its own way. Among the city's highlights are Martin Luther King Jr.'s Atlanta, which includes stops at the King birth home; historic Ebenezer Baptist Church, where the late civil rights leader was baptized and where his funeral was held; and the Sweet Auburn Historic District in downtown Atlanta, a six-square-block area and the historic headquarters of African-American life and business.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman | January 18, 2009
Tomorrow is the national holiday celebrating the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday. Atlanta, the birthplace and resting place of King, is a great destination for exploring the rich cultural heritage of African-Americans. The Sweet Auburn Historic District, along Auburn Avenue, features several preserved sites reflecting the civil rights movement and King's legacy. 1 Honor history : The Martin Luther King National Historic Site is one of the most-visited attractions in Atlanta. Here you can take a guided tour of the two-story house where King was born and see the tomb where he was laid to rest.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Evening Sun Staff | October 22, 1991
ATLANTA -- Even now, with only beams, cables and an outer shell to suggest its future majesty, the Georgia Dome already casts a striking impression on the Atlanta skyline.The hope among local officials here is that the nation's newest indoor playground will leave an equally indelible mark on the sporting world."We've got a lot of great plans for this place," said Khalil A. Johnson, general manager of the facility, located in the heart of downtown Atlanta, just across from the Omni arena and CNN Center.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Evening Sun Staff | October 11, 1991
ATLANTA -- The giant billboard just off the northbound Connector, a six-lane mega highway that courses through downtown Atlanta, speaks volumes about the state of this city with just one sentence and one symbol.The sentence: "Atlanta Will Never Be A Baseball Town." And the symbol: a huge tomahawk perched directly in the middle of the sentence, making it out to be a lie.For yes, this genteel Southern city resting in the midst of the Confederacy has gone slightly daft over its Braves, who bring their improbable road show home for the middle three games of the National League Championship Series, beginning tomorrow afternoon.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 21, 1991
Stroll around downtown Atlanta and you'll see an incredible number of things that were built about 1864. A century from now, visitors will see an incredible number of things that were built about 1996.The first building boom was necessitated by Civil War Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's infamous March to the Sea, during which he burned this Georgia city to the ground.The current boom is tied to the 1996 Summer Olympics -- an event that appears to be viewed here as having nearly the same import.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 26, 2004
ATLANTA - The Georgia Supreme Court unanimously struck down the state's four-year-old hate-crimes law yesterday, ruling it "unconstitutionally vague." Justice Carol W. Hunstein wrote in the opinion that hate-crimes laws could be appropriate but that this one did not give people of ordinary intelligence a specific enough warning of what conduct to avoid. L. David Wolfe, the lawyer for Christopher Botts, one of those appealing to the court, said, "It seems to me that most violent crimes are motivated by some sort of prejudice or bias.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1996
Bethesda-based Host Marriott Corp. has bought a Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Atlanta and acquired a controlling interest in two other Ritz-Carlton hotels for $331 million.The posh hotels -- two in Atlanta and one in Naples, Fla. -- are the latest deals in an aggressive acquisition strategy the lodging company embarked on in 1993.The deals announced yesterday are the first Ritz-Carlton Hotels in which Host Marriott has purchased stakes, but the company says it's interested in acquiring interests in more of the hotels, whose name is associated with top-drawer service and luxury.
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