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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
Owings Mills-based developer David S. Brown Enterprises Ltd. plans to construct a 30-story mixed-use building on West Baltimore Street on the eastern edge of the University of Maryland, Baltimore campus. A parking structure and four-story building would be demolished to make way for the mid-block tower, which would be flanked on its western side by the historic Abell Building. Early plans for the structure were approved by the city's architectural review panel Thursday. The building, at 325 W. Baltimore St., is planned to contain roughly 100,000 square feet of office space, about 225 apartments and above-ground parking for approximately 400 vehicles.
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
Owings Mills-based developer David S. Brown Enterprises Ltd. plans to construct a 30-story mixed-use building on West Baltimore Street on the eastern edge of the University of Maryland, Baltimore campus. A parking structure and four-story building would be demolished to make way for the mid-block tower, which would be flanked on its western side by the historic Abell Building. Early plans for the structure were approved by the city's architectural review panel Thursday. The building, at 325 W. Baltimore St., is planned to contain roughly 100,000 square feet of office space, about 225 apartments and above-ground parking for approximately 400 vehicles.
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BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
Construction magnate Willard Hackerman has offered to finance and build an 18,500-seat arena in downtown Baltimore, civic leaders say, freeing taxpayers from having to foot the bill and significantly increasing the chances that plans for a $900 million convention center expansion and arena will become a reality. News of Hackerman's offer was made public Wednesday at the annual meeting of the Greater Baltimore Committee, a private business group that has been exploring ways to build an arena that would be combined with an expanded convention center to bolster the city's tourism business and add life to Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 21, 2011
Tuesday night's "Baltimore Hockey Classic" at the municipal dump we call an arena was great except for one thing: The game was played on water instead of ice. Apparently, the people responsible for it couldn't get the ice to set, either because the freezer system beneath the surface is old and flawed or because someone forgot to turn on the A/C in First Mariner Arena. And laying down too much water when they resurfaced the ice between periods of the game didn't help, either. The result was slow hockey that made eyes glaze within five minutes.
NEWS
July 7, 2008
Frank Remesch, general manager of 1st Mariner Arena, has shown that big isn't necessarily better, and mid-size can be profitable. It's something members of a Baltimore Development Corp. team should keep in mind as they choose a location for a new Baltimore arena. A slightly enlarged facility with a snappy design should be the priority - not building a greatly expanded complex with the intention of wooing a professional sports team to Baltimore. The outdated, city-owned arena has hosted marquee acts in recent years and reaped the benefits.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,Sun Reporter | July 11, 2008
Representatives of the WNBA have met with Mayor Sheila Dixon to discuss the possibility of moving a franchise to Baltimore once a new downtown arena is built, Dixon said yesterday. The mayor also said she would like to see the new facility built on the same downtown site where the 14,000-seat 1st Mariner Arena stands. Dixon mentioned the possibility of attracting a women's basketball franchise after being asked if a new arena should be large enough for an NBA team. "I think we need a larger arena," she said.
NEWS
June 8, 2011
News that Baltimore may have a benefactor willing to finance $500 million of construction ("Proposed downtown arena gets private financing commitment," May 25) invites one to dream of a history-making school construction campaign. Imagine Baltimore preparing to open 20 brand new, state-of-the-art public schools. Or 15, or 10, or however many schools can be built with the resources needed to construct an arena. I don't dream of a big, new arena and its touted benefits. I dream of a city school system so pumped up, so modern, so enticing that families move here to give their children a great public education.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 6, 2007
It is the largest city in the state, the anchor of a metropolitan region, with sprawling and relatively affluent suburbs all around it. It is located near the confluence of rivers and gets quite humid in summer. It is home of a football team in the AFC of the NFL. It has a baseball team in the American League. It once had an NBA team, but not for years. It no longer has a hockey franchise, either. But this town is hungry for more sports. Sounds pretty much like Baltimore, doesn't it? Except for one thing: The city I'm describing is in Missouri and has a brand-new, 18,000-plus seat downtown arena.
NEWS
June 1, 2011
I've been a Baltimore resident for 25 years, and reading about businessman Willard Hackerman's offer to finance and build a $500 million arena and hotel if the city and state can come up with the $400 million to expand the convention center sounds like an excellent plan to help Baltimore's economy ("Proposed downtown arena gets private financing commitment," May 25). This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. Mr. Hackerman has truly given Baltimore a chance to totally transform into a major city when it comes to tourism and conventions since he will pay for the arena and hotel, which is more than half of the projected total amount of this project.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | March 25, 2007
Enough area basketball fans and observers said it while walking around HSBC Arena last weekend to make it more than a fleeting thought by a niche audience: "If Buffalo can host the NCAAs, why can't Baltimore?" The answer, of course, is simple: You have to have a decent building to play in, and this city has everything but that - and its building hardly qualifies as "decent." With no disrespect intended to the hosts of the first- and second-round games of the men's basketball tournament last weekend - and that disclaimer was repeated in all sincerity by the aforementioned audience - the only thing Buffalo's downtown area has that Baltimore doesn't is an arena.
NEWS
June 8, 2011
News that Baltimore may have a benefactor willing to finance $500 million of construction ("Proposed downtown arena gets private financing commitment," May 25) invites one to dream of a history-making school construction campaign. Imagine Baltimore preparing to open 20 brand new, state-of-the-art public schools. Or 15, or 10, or however many schools can be built with the resources needed to construct an arena. I don't dream of a big, new arena and its touted benefits. I dream of a city school system so pumped up, so modern, so enticing that families move here to give their children a great public education.
NEWS
June 1, 2011
I've been a Baltimore resident for 25 years, and reading about businessman Willard Hackerman's offer to finance and build a $500 million arena and hotel if the city and state can come up with the $400 million to expand the convention center sounds like an excellent plan to help Baltimore's economy ("Proposed downtown arena gets private financing commitment," May 25). This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. Mr. Hackerman has truly given Baltimore a chance to totally transform into a major city when it comes to tourism and conventions since he will pay for the arena and hotel, which is more than half of the projected total amount of this project.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2011
A new downtown arena and hotel? Nice. An expanded convention center? Uh, OK. Laser light shows, dancing waters and all those other Vegas touches for the Inner Harbor? Well, now you're starting to lose me. This week brought the kind of big, shiny downtown development plans not seen since the days of William Donald Schaefer. Even Schaefer's old ally, Willard Hackerman reappeared, with a very cool $500 million offer to privately finance the proposed arena and hotel. I'm as primed for a jolt of new construction downtown as anyone, especially when Hackerman is willing to come up with more than half of the estimated costs.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
Construction magnate Willard Hackerman has offered to finance and build an 18,500-seat arena in downtown Baltimore, civic leaders say, freeing taxpayers from having to foot the bill and significantly increasing the chances that plans for a $900 million convention center expansion and arena will become a reality. News of Hackerman's offer was made public Wednesday at the annual meeting of the Greater Baltimore Committee, a private business group that has been exploring ways to build an arena that would be combined with an expanded convention center to bolster the city's tourism business and add life to Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2010
When Angel McCoughtry left Louisville in 2009 after a magical Final Four run with the women's basketball team, the Baltimore native was one of the college game's most dominant players. She was a three-time All-American, Big East player of the year (2007) and defensive player of the year (2009), as well as the school's all-time leading scorer and rebounder. But she has become so much more. When McCoughtry returns to the Louisville campus this week, it will be as one of the rising stars in the WNBA, a stalwart on the U.S. women's team and a young woman of uncommon character.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,Sun Reporter | July 11, 2008
Representatives of the WNBA have met with Mayor Sheila Dixon to discuss the possibility of moving a franchise to Baltimore once a new downtown arena is built, Dixon said yesterday. The mayor also said she would like to see the new facility built on the same downtown site where the 14,000-seat 1st Mariner Arena stands. Dixon mentioned the possibility of attracting a women's basketball franchise after being asked if a new arena should be large enough for an NBA team. "I think we need a larger arena," she said.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | October 22, 2004
VERY QUIETLY, under the cover of the Ravens, the baseball playoffs and the usual October confluence of sports, the Maryland Stadium Authority last week snipped away ever so slightly at what's left of the ties between Baltimore and pro basketball. It wasn't their intention to do so. It sure was the result, though. They had every sound, logical reason to recommend that the proposed downtown arena (which would replace, finally, the Arena Formerly Known as the Civic Center) seat fewer than the required capacity for an NBA or NHL building.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | May 14, 2006
In recent weeks, Baltimore has seen a harsh light shine on the gaping void in its sports landscape. Beloved ballpark, state-of-the-art football stadium, but nothing even remotely resembling a top-notch basketball facility. Plans are in the works to change that. Not anytime soon, but by the start of 2007 - thanks to a $100,000 study on the feasibility of a new downtown arena - we'll know if Camden Yards and M&T Bank Stadium should expect to get a sibling. Not to disparage 1st Mariner Arena, one-time home of the Bullets and current home of indoor soccer's champion Blast.
NEWS
July 7, 2008
Frank Remesch, general manager of 1st Mariner Arena, has shown that big isn't necessarily better, and mid-size can be profitable. It's something members of a Baltimore Development Corp. team should keep in mind as they choose a location for a new Baltimore arena. A slightly enlarged facility with a snappy design should be the priority - not building a greatly expanded complex with the intention of wooing a professional sports team to Baltimore. The outdated, city-owned arena has hosted marquee acts in recent years and reaped the benefits.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 6, 2007
It is the largest city in the state, the anchor of a metropolitan region, with sprawling and relatively affluent suburbs all around it. It is located near the confluence of rivers and gets quite humid in summer. It is home of a football team in the AFC of the NFL. It has a baseball team in the American League. It once had an NBA team, but not for years. It no longer has a hockey franchise, either. But this town is hungry for more sports. Sounds pretty much like Baltimore, doesn't it? Except for one thing: The city I'm describing is in Missouri and has a brand-new, 18,000-plus seat downtown arena.
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