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Susan Reimer | January 9, 2013
America has a remarkably close relationship with its previous owner. It seems we no sooner threw off the yoke of George III than we started collecting mugs decorated with the images of royal wedding partners. England and the United States have been staunch allies for more than a century, and what diplomats call "a special relationship" has matured with time and wars. And as the breadth and might of British Empire diminished and we emerged as a world power, we still looked to the English with the respect of a student who has surpassed his tutor but cannot bring himself to acknowledge the new order.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple and For The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
A cocktail bar in South Baltimore new to the scene, Bar Liquorice recently had a soft opening. It has been tweaking its dimly lit lounge aesthetic thanks to one Jeff Cahill, previously of Helen's Garden/John Stevens LTD while co-owner Tom Looney of Gypsy Queen food truck and Helen's Garden fame has been building the food menu. With these two realms in good hands, the cocktail list should be soon to follow. And indeed, Bar Liquorice has a noteworthy cocktail program featuring the time-honored "modern twists on the classics," from New Old-Fashioneds to Manhattans and Moscow Mule variants.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and Assistant editor, b | January 8, 2014
So this is the storyline that divided "Downton" fans in the U.K. And it's easy to see why. Anna has always been the one "Downton" character, upstairs or downstairs, who we all rooted for and loved from the beginning. She's been through a lot: covering up Pamuk's death, dealing with her husband, Bates, in prison, helping to free him from prison ... not to mention having to dress Lady Mary. And to see such a horrible thing happen to her is difficult to watch. In the midst of a party upstairs, as famous opera soprano Nellie Melba sings a touching, lovely song, she is attacked and raped by the valet of a visiting guest.  As Melba sings "O mio babbino caro," dedicated to love and lovers, Anna, who had left the concert (and her husband's side)
NEWS
March 14, 2014
Lord and Lady Crawley, the Earl and Countess of Grantham, made an appearance. So did their daughters, the ladies Mary, Edith and Sybil, along with Carson, the butler, and assorted lady's maids, valets and footmen. When fans of "Downton Abbey" were invited to masquerade as their favorite character on the hit television series, 500 people showed up at the Gordon Center for Performing Arts, dressed from haute to humble. On a wintry afternoon in February, Randi Benesch sat in her office at the Jewish Community Center Owings Mills and talked about the event.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
The Dowager Countess' quips may be priceless, but living at "Downton Abbey" has a high price tag.  Money-saving website (oh, the irony) NetVoucherCodes.co.uk  has calculated that a year of living at the estate would cost $8,365,292. That's a lot of silver polish for Mr. Carson. The website breaks down a "budget. " Maintenance is about $2.9 million, oil costs almost $1 million. Even a yearly surprise of logs (must keep those fireplaces going) would run you almost $46,000.  See the graphic breakdown below.  Season 4 of "Downton Abbey" is airing now in the U.K. It premieres across the pond (aka: here)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
With the season finale of "Downton Abbey" approaching on Sunday, I couldn't resist devoting one more Midweek Madness entry to the show -- the perfect addition to your paper doll collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and Assistant editor, b | January 19, 2014
That "glamorous pirate" Lord Gillingham is working on some sort of Guinness World Record of pursuit here.  I'd be weirded out a bit if Tony wasn't more likeable. He's proper, but not insufferable. And doesn't get drunk easily like Sir John "Dimples" Bullock. And Mary is clearly a catch -- she has the looks, the property and side-saddle riding abilities. But compared with Matthew Crawley's epic 147-year courtship of Mary, Lord Gillingham's unexpected marriage proposal seems pretty jarring.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | January 22, 2013
Starting this Wednesday, Charleston will offer a supper-for-two menu in the bar. Think of it as a way to soak up some of Charleston's atmosphere, and Cindy Wolf's cooking, without committing to the full tasting menu experience. The menu, which will change weekly, costs $100 for a couple. The main course for the debut supper, which is inspired by "Downton Abbey," is a lobster pie, butter poached lobster, Yukon gold potatoes and brandy cream in puff pastry. The appetizer is ham-stuffed mushrooms, and the supper includes a course of Stilton cheese and winds up with a course of mignardises -- think small cookies and petit fours -- served with a Claret ice, a sorbet made with red wine.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Spend Christmas at Downton Abbey! Well, officially it's Highclere, the historic manse that is the setting for the hit PBS television series, but that in no way diminishes the appeal of a holiday dance at a castle, no less. Virgin Atlantic and Maryland Public Television have teamed up to offer a December vacation package to London that includes seasonal festivities at Highclere Castle.  Travelers will visit the 1,000-acre estate in Hampshire, England, and enjoy a three-course dinner served in the manor's library and a Christmas Season Ball featuring a professional chorus singing carols in a room decorated with a 17-foot Christmas tree.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
Sunday night's installment of this season's "Downton Abbey" will be most talked about because of what happened below stairs while everyone else was attending a recital by the legendary Dame Nellie Melba. I figured dear old Melba deserved a wee bit more respect than she got at Downton, where, in addition to that dreadful business involving a beloved servant, some of the upper-crusties walked out on the diva to play cards and some others who stayed made snide remarks. Tres déclassé.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2014
Welcome to the Season 4 finale -- downsized in drama and housing. "Downsized" being a relative term. Compared to last year's finale, when Matthew bit the dust, there wasn't a grand dramatic moment this time around. To be fair, this isn't quite a "season finale" in the American TV sense of the word. In Britain, this is the Christmas Special, re-packaged and re-promoted as the "season finale" here. It's a bit of false advertising, but we'll take it.  And the "downsized" housing?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2014
It's something of a "Downton" tradition to include a party/dinner/community event towards the end of a season in order to get all the characters together to start to tie up lot of the storylines. Well, most of them.  In the penultimate episode of Season 4, we get this device in the form a church bazaar on the Downton grounds -- finally something for Cora to do! She seems as happy as we are to finally have her do anything.  Anyway, a lot goes down this episode: First, Downton's pig-man is now going to be Drewe (the other pig-man is clearly going to blacklisted by the Crawleys for his pig-man failure)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and Assistant editor, b | January 26, 2014
Since Bates (and also the audience) can't handle more scenes of Anna shuddering at his very sight, he takes it upon himsef to get to the bottom of the matter.  And he almost hears the whole truth.  Mirroring the beginning of last week's episode, when a deeply depressed Anna walks alone to the house, we now first see Bates by himself, walking from the Cottage of Despair to Downton.  Anna is seen still applying make-up to cover her injuries,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and Assistant editor, b | January 19, 2014
That "glamorous pirate" Lord Gillingham is working on some sort of Guinness World Record of pursuit here.  I'd be weirded out a bit if Tony wasn't more likeable. He's proper, but not insufferable. And doesn't get drunk easily like Sir John "Dimples" Bullock. And Mary is clearly a catch -- she has the looks, the property and side-saddle riding abilities. But compared with Matthew Crawley's epic 147-year courtship of Mary, Lord Gillingham's unexpected marriage proposal seems pretty jarring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
Sunday night's installment of this season's "Downton Abbey" will be most talked about because of what happened below stairs while everyone else was attending a recital by the legendary Dame Nellie Melba. I figured dear old Melba deserved a wee bit more respect than she got at Downton, where, in addition to that dreadful business involving a beloved servant, some of the upper-crusties walked out on the diva to play cards and some others who stayed made snide remarks. Tres déclassé.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and Assistant editor, b | January 8, 2014
So this is the storyline that divided "Downton" fans in the U.K. And it's easy to see why. Anna has always been the one "Downton" character, upstairs or downstairs, who we all rooted for and loved from the beginning. She's been through a lot: covering up Pamuk's death, dealing with her husband, Bates, in prison, helping to free him from prison ... not to mention having to dress Lady Mary. And to see such a horrible thing happen to her is difficult to watch. In the midst of a party upstairs, as famous opera soprano Nellie Melba sings a touching, lovely song, she is attacked and raped by the valet of a visiting guest.  As Melba sings "O mio babbino caro," dedicated to love and lovers, Anna, who had left the concert (and her husband's side)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
All it takes is a little swine emergency for Mary to claim herself a third suitor.  It's about a year after Matthew's death, and, yeah, it's a bit jarring to see Mary pursued by three men so soon. But it's also a bit fun. Well, Lord Gillingham is fun. Evelyn Napier's a bit blah. He's nice enough, but in a total friend-zone sort of way.  Now enter Charles Blake, who, in the course of this episode, goes from considering Mary "aloof" (super-mean, early-20th-century wise) to crushing on her.  The pigs have arrived!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and Assistant editor, b | January 26, 2014
Since Bates (and also the audience) can't handle more scenes of Anna shuddering at his very sight, he takes it upon himsef to get to the bottom of the matter.  And he almost hears the whole truth.  Mirroring the beginning of last week's episode, when a deeply depressed Anna walks alone to the house, we now first see Bates by himself, walking from the Cottage of Despair to Downton.  Anna is seen still applying make-up to cover her injuries,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
They might be a little snooty, but it would be hard to find a family more welcome in these parts than the Crawleys of “Downton Abbey” - at least in Owings Mills, home of Maryland Public Television. Just as “American Idol” in its heyday used to attract tens of thousands of new viewers to Fox affiliates like WBFF in Baltimore, so has “Downton Abbey” come to be a ratings, promotional and fundraising bonanza for PBS affiliates like MPT. “The total audience for 'Downton Abbey' is nearly twice what our other leading programs deliver on an episode-by-episode basis,” says Steven Schupak, chief content officer.
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