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Downsizing

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NEWS
By MURRAY SALTZMAN DANIEL S. GREENBERG | January 30, 1995
Downsizing may be a good euphemism for weight reduction. Downsizing as a philosophy to characterize the nation's destiny leaves a lot to be desired.Few would argue that government often becomes bloated, especially when it follows a principle of spending to the extent possible, rather than when necessary. Certainly, helping impoverished and hopeless people at society's bottom economic rung to lift themselves up through educational and employment programs is far better than giving handouts that increase dependency.
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CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
For many people, midlife is a time for fresh beginnings, and often those beginnings bring the exhilaration of reinvention. Deb Moriarty, vice president of student affairs at Towson University, acknowledges both. After 13 years in Catonsville, her large home was suddenly an empty place filled with the memories of her recently deceased husband, Greg Giovanazzi, and a daughter, Casey, now 20, about to take off for college. It was at that point last August that the 59-year-old gathered up her favorite mementos, pieces of artwork and assorted photographs and left Catonsville for a Bozzuto-built, three-story townhouse in the new development of Towson Green.
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NEWS
September 15, 1991
State government's $1 billion budget crisis is forcing the University of Maryland to take some overdue steps to bring about a more coherent and compact public higher-education system. By the time the downsizing is over, UM probably will have fewer institutions, fewer program offerings and fewer research ventures. But what remains is likely to be far better focused and adequately funded.When Chancellor Donald N. Langenberg was formally inaugurated this summer, he talked about shaking up the UM hierarchy and questioning how the university system can deliver its services more effectively and more efficiently.
NEWS
By David S. Cloud and John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
The Army would shrink to its lowest troop levels since just before World War II under a budget proposed Monday by the Obama administration that seeks to downsize the Pentagon in ways that could have a significant impact on service members and contractors in Maryland. The proposed cuts reflect changing fortunes in the once-sacrosanct defense budget. Congress has ordered nearly $500 billion in defense spending cuts over the next decade, causing a harsh re-evaluation of military needs as the nation closes out the punishing ground wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
A coalition that advocates for cuts to military spending is calling on Maryland to establish a military downsizing commission to help the state deal with the result of reductions already underway. Fund Our Communities, made up of 60-some political, veteran, faith and union organizations, said Wednesday that it is asking legislators to launch a jobs-focused commission "tasked with developing plans and policies to ensure a competitive advantage for Maryland" as military spending falls.
BUSINESS
By By Jamie Smith Hopkins | The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2009
Bob Kean really likes the Roland Park house he carefully restored. But now - as he searches for a job to replace the one he lost - five bedrooms and 4,200 square feet strike him as a luxury he can't afford. His plan: Sell and move into a much smaller home with much smaller costs. Cheaper utility bills. Lower property taxes. Little or no mortgage. "I'd prefer to stay exactly as I am, but that's not going to happen. And I accept that," said Kean, 60, who lost his credit management position more than a year ago after his employer was acquired.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1997
Blame it on the finance mergers?Top business executives in the Baltimore region assign "industry consolidation" the top blame for corporate downsizing in recent years, in slight contrast to their peers in other cities.In a survey by the Gallup Organization for phone company MCI, 555 chief executives, owners and presidents of mid- to large-size businesses were questioned about competition. The poll included 116 bosses in the Baltimore area, plus people in Atlanta, Chicago, New York and San Francisco.
FEATURES
By Maida Odom and Maida Odom,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 29, 1993
Honest communication is the simple solution."Very, very simple," says management consultant Matt Oechsli, "but not easy."The problem is spelled out in Mr. Oechsli's new survey of 1,485 workers and managers. According to the report, 89 percent of those who were asked what two changes they would like in the workplace answered that they'd like to "change management," and 91 percent said the workplace needed to "improve communication."From these and other responses to 10 open-ended questions, asked with the promise of anonymity, Mr. Oechsli concluded that many workers do not feel they are listened to or appreciated.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | November 24, 1997
IF DICK DAVIDSON hadn't fired so many people, he might have made some money last week.Thursday, Nov. 20, was supposed to be his big score.Options for a whopping 281,100 shares of stock in railroad Union Pacific Corp., in Davidson's name, were supposed to go live that day, regulatory filings show. Had everything happened according to plan, Davidson could have cashed options worth -- this is a conservative estimate -- $2 million.Don't make a deposit on the Gulfstream yet, Dick.The Nov. 20 options are worthless so far. Union Pacific is a mess.
BUSINESS
By Gary Gately | November 19, 1995
WORDS TO make employees shudder: restructuring, downsizing, re-engineering. They've become part of the everyday lexicon at hundreds of U.S. companies that have laid off hundreds of thousands in the name of efficiency.But recently some corporations, consultants and business leaders have questioned the wisdom of large-scale cutbacks. How much is too much? What of survivors and their morale? Productivity, efficiency, corporate image? Have investors and others begun casting a wary eye toward downsizing as a quick fix that detracts from long-term, healthy growth?
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
A coalition that advocates for cuts to military spending is calling on Maryland to establish a military downsizing commission to help the state deal with the result of reductions already underway. Fund Our Communities, made up of 60-some political, veteran, faith and union organizations, said Wednesday that it is asking legislators to launch a jobs-focused commission "tasked with developing plans and policies to ensure a competitive advantage for Maryland" as military spending falls.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
After a four-year search for the perfect piece of waterfront property on which to build their dream home, Mike and Lana Condon hit the jackpot in November 2011. A little cottage, bearing the water damage of countless summer storms and winter winds, sat on 1 acre on the banks of the Middle River in the eastern Baltimore County neighborhood of Bowleys Quarters. The Condons purchased the double lot -- with old trees providing shade on the street side of the property and a sweeping plain of open lawn to the original bulkhead and pier on the river -- for $362,500.
BUSINESS
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
When her husband of 30 years died in 2004, Rosalie Lijinsky decided she no longer wanted to live in the 3,000-square-foot home they had shared with their daughter in the Columbia neighborhood of Hickory Ridge. She sold the house the same year for $720,000, more than double the purchase price, and rented a townhouse in Columbia with a view of Lake Elkhorn. Five years later, she purchased a townhouse in the same community overlooking the lake for $370,000. Her new home, built in 1986, has four stories, but it's about half the size of her previous residence, she said.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
When Gunther and Linda Than moved into their one-bedroom unit in Canton's Anchorage Tower condominiums, they really downsized. The Thans moved from their larger unit in the Anchorage to one of the smallest at less than 1,000 square feet of living space, which includes the outdoor balcony. The entire front of the condo (living room, dining area, master bedroom and balcony), like every unit in the Anchorage Tower, has a water view, as well as a view of the city skyline and beyond. "Every unit here has a great view [so]
NEWS
April 19, 2013
It seems we have reached an odd kind of stage in the United States when the Supreme Court has ruled that campaign spending by corporate fatcats is permissible "free speech," but Dr. Ben Carson's utterances against gay marriage are considered impermissible bigotry by his employers. I would note that Dr. Carson did not advocate punishment, imprisonment or persecution for same-sex couples; he only questioned their right to marriage, an institution millions of straight Americans have foregone in favor of mere cohabitation.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Robert and Miriam Stern's condominium in the Annen Woods community in Pikesville is emblematic of their many years together — interesting, colorful, tastefully artistic and comfortably eclectic in style. This latest chapter in their story finds the retirees and longtime empty-nesters choosing to downsize and simplify their lives while keeping close the treasures they have collected and the memories attached to them. "We bought this end unit in the front of the building in June 2012," said Miriam Stern, a 71-year-old former medical secretary.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1997
As the corporate merger wars continue to rob Baltimore of power and jobs, area business leaders got several general's-eye reports on the conflict yesterday. The dispatches were mixed.At BT Alex. Brown Inc., "The only moves of which I am aware are moving business this way," said A. B. "Buzzy" Krongard, vice chairman of Bankers Trust New York Corp.Bankers Trust bought Baltimore-based investment bank Alex. Brown earlier this year. Since then, Krongard said, "all of the people and movement have come this way" as Bankers Trust has shunted jobs to Brown's Timonium operations.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | February 21, 1991
Five top city Recreation and Parks officials are being fired as part of what the agency's director calls an on-going "downsizing and reorganization" of the department.Speaking before the City Council's Budget and Appropriations Committee yesterday, Recreation and Parks Director Marlyn J. Perritt said the layoffs are being made to trim the agency's operation."We're looking at the agency and trying to determine how we can more effectively deliver program services," Perritt said.The layoff notices, which went out Tuesday and are effective March 29, hit these high ranking officials in the department:* Deputy Director Ralph Chase, who served as acting director before Perritt's appointment.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
When Maureen Neunan's only child headed off to college halfway across the country, the four-bedroom, four-bathroom Ellicott City house where the two lived suddenly seemed enormous to the 56-year-old divorcee. "I decided this was not where I wanted to be," she said. "I didn't need big or grand anymore. " And so she and her friend, real estate agentr Carol Walters of Long & Foster's Columbia office, paid a visit to the Ritz-Carlton Residences at Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Neunan recalled visiting the unit she bought at first sight.
NEWS
December 4, 2012
Regarding your article about Maryland's victims of Sandy who are getting tired of waiting for government help ("Sandy's victims waiting for aid," Nov. 30), I wonder if these are the same conservatives who wanted government out of their lives. Barbara Gilmour, Towson
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