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NEWS
August 29, 2014
As Maryland allows more and more casinos to saturate the landscape and the radio, television and newspapers make a big deal about it, a question arises ( "Baltimore opens new Horseshoe Casino," Aug. 26). Will the same media be forthcoming in reporting cases of citizens who have ruined their lives and those of their dependents after they have lost the money that was supposed to clothe and feed them? Will the inevitable proliferation of "Gamblers' Anonymous" be duly chronicled?
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NEWS
August 29, 2014
As Maryland allows more and more casinos to saturate the landscape and the radio, television and newspapers make a big deal about it, a question arises ( "Baltimore opens new Horseshoe Casino," Aug. 26). Will the same media be forthcoming in reporting cases of citizens who have ruined their lives and those of their dependents after they have lost the money that was supposed to clothe and feed them? Will the inevitable proliferation of "Gamblers' Anonymous" be duly chronicled?
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NEWS
August 14, 2014
In the second most dangerous city in the country, your letter writers should not be too concerned with kids doing drugs ( "After deaths at Merriweather, Moonrise Festival should be canceled," Aug. 7). Their concern is admirable, but if you were to cancel a show and lock electronic dance music concerts down, it would only create a bigger backlash from fans of this music, which in turn would create a harder and heavier-hitting drug scene. This "dangerous" Moonrise Festival also employed hundreds of people in an area that has a desperate need for jobs.
NEWS
August 14, 2014
In the second most dangerous city in the country, your letter writers should not be too concerned with kids doing drugs ( "After deaths at Merriweather, Moonrise Festival should be canceled," Aug. 7). Their concern is admirable, but if you were to cancel a show and lock electronic dance music concerts down, it would only create a bigger backlash from fans of this music, which in turn would create a harder and heavier-hitting drug scene. This "dangerous" Moonrise Festival also employed hundreds of people in an area that has a desperate need for jobs.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | September 3, 2007
ATLANTA -- Despite the harsh partisanship that had begun to infect politics by the 1990s, there was at least one tenet about which mainstream Democrats and Republicans agreed: Globalization is good. The wonders of free markets have been touted by Democrats Robert E. Rubin and Lawrence Summers as well as Republicans Carlos Gutierrez and Henry M. Paulson Jr. Belief in the glories of global markets is widely shared - a civic religion, especially among the chattering classes. As with most religions, however, its miracles are exaggerated.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 15, 2014
I am standing at the front door, locked out of my own house. If this were a movie, it'd be raining. Thankfully, this isn't so it isn't. But the reality is embarrassing enough without any Hollywood embellishments. You see, we have this digital lock. To open it, you input a numeric code. We bought it months ago and I've been using it without incident. But now, standing out here in the dark, I am, suddenly and for no apparent reason, stuck. After a moment, with more hope than confidence, I punch in some numbers.
BUSINESS
By JULIE CLAIRE DIOP | June 13, 2004
I ONCE lived in a rundown Chicago neighborhood where crumbling buildings and liquor stores lined the streets. Check-cashing stores sat on every other block. More than 10 percent of U.S. families don't have checking accounts, according to the Federal Reserve's most recent survey of consumer finances. They rely on currency exchanges and similar storefront businesses, which typically take a cut of 2.5 percent, and as much as 5 percent to 6 percent, of the checks they cash. The fees are much higher than the cost of maintaining a checking account at a bank.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2003
Maryland faces staggering social costs in the form of increased crime, bankruptcies, divorces and other ills if it opens the door to slot machines, an array of speakers told anti-gambling activists at a national conference in Linthicum yesterday. The message was delivered by state Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. and two university professors who study gambling and its impact nationally. In his remarks to the National Coalition Against Gambling Expansion, Curran pointed to a research study that shows the economic costs of gambling far outweigh the benefits.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff | March 13, 2005
Dan has left the studio. The Great Anchor Hunt is in full swing at CBS Evening News following Dan Rather's departure from the anchor chair Wednesday. The becalming Bob Schieffer will hold the fort down for probably three months -- but then who? CBS president Leslie Moonves has said he wants to reinvent the nightly broadcast with perhaps a team of newscasters rather than with, say, another aging white guy. The names Katie Couric, John Roberts, Jon Stewart, Scott Pelly and Anderson Cooper have surfaced in the last several months.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker and Kathleen Parker,kparker@kparker.com | January 9, 2009
When it comes to the six Republicans competing for lead dog of the GOP leadership, all are on point: They love Ronald Reagan, are pro-life, advocate small government and promise more diversity and fewer taxes. They are also, with one exception, locked and loaded - armed in Second Amendment solidarity. During a 90-minute debate this week at the National Press Club, only Michael S. Steele, the former Maryland lieutenant governor, confessed to owning no guns. Say what? In a race where Mr. Steele's conservative bona fides are already held in suspicion, did his admission unseal any deal?
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 15, 2014
I am standing at the front door, locked out of my own house. If this were a movie, it'd be raining. Thankfully, this isn't so it isn't. But the reality is embarrassing enough without any Hollywood embellishments. You see, we have this digital lock. To open it, you input a numeric code. We bought it months ago and I've been using it without incident. But now, standing out here in the dark, I am, suddenly and for no apparent reason, stuck. After a moment, with more hope than confidence, I punch in some numbers.
NEWS
January 7, 2014
Thank you for Tim Wheeler 's article on opposition to the construction of a new natural gas pipeline because of the effects it may have on local water supplies ("Pipeline may affect drinking water, activists fear," Jan. 1). There are other reasons to oppose the building of this pipeline. Natural gas is popular because it is inexpensive and promoted as burning cleaner than coal. However, when one factors in the greenhouse gas effects of methane leaks during drilling and transportation, it may not be cleaner than coal.
NEWS
February 9, 2012
Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler is right to sign on to the multi-state settlement with the nation's five largest banks over some aspects of the faulty procedures they used to foreclose on homes during the mortgage crisis. The state stands to gain nearly $1 billion to help struggling homeowners and those who have already been foreclosed on, and it gives up relatively little in return. Most important of all, settling means the state can get help now - before it's too late for thousands of homeowners.
NEWS
April 16, 2011
In his commentary in the Baltimore Sun ("End the MTA Monopoly," April 14), Professor James Dorn of Towson University, and the Cato Foundation whose journal he edits, would have us privatize our public transportation. Dorn characterizes the Maryland Transit Administration (MTA) as a monopoly, without mentioning the scores of private transportation providers (vans, shuttles, taxis, etc.), including the massive French multinational corporation Veolia, which already co-exist with the MTA right here in the Baltimore region.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2010
Low inflation is a welcome economic sign for spenders, but for savers, it can be too much of a good thing. The effect of super low inflation could be seen in recent days when the government announced changes to savings bond rates and retirement account limits that are pegged to inflation. Savers can now expect meager returns on the inflation-protected Series I Savings Bonds, if they even still want to buy them. And employees won't be able to sock away more next year in a 401(k)
NEWS
By Joseph L. Kroart III | August 2, 2010
With the emergence of the Internet marketplace, the early years of the 21st century will likely be recognized as the beginning of a radical transformation of the mode of many retail transactions. Not since the advent of mass-produced mail-order catalogs has there been such an altering influence on the fundamental nature of how people shop. Internet retail sales represent less than 10 percent of total annual retail sales figures, but this number is somewhat misleading. This decade, annual online retail sales have skyrocketed from $27 billion in 2000 to $134 billion in 2009.
FEATURES
By HAL BOEDEKER and HAL BOEDEKER,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 19, 2006
There is a downside to winning American Idol. The victor can be profiled in a movie as dreadful as The Fantasia Barrino Story: Life Is Not a Fairy Tale. The film premieres at 9 tonight on Lifetime, and Barrino's story would seem perfect fare for a cable channel dedicated to empowering women. The Fantasia Barrino Story: Life Is Not a Fairy Tale airs at 9 tonight on Lifetime; it repeats at 8 p.m. tomorrow and 9 p.m. Monday.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 2003
I want to start a health journal. What should I include in my daily notes? The contents of a health or fitness journal will vary depending on your goals. Recording exercise and diet habits is most common, but other topics include sleep schedules, game or match scores, practice or race times, and suggestions from doctors and trainers. The great thing about a journal is that it allows you to chart your progress and helps boost motivation. The downside is that it can be tedious to keep. To avoid dropping the pen after a few weeks, chart habits that are most important to you. Don't feel like you have to write down every weight lifted or every cracker eaten.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,jamison.hensley@baltsun.com | September 8, 2009
Sunday's season opener will be more meaningful for cornerback Domonique Foxworth than for any other Raven. Foxworth, a graduate of Catonsville's Western Tech and the University of Maryland, will play his first game for the hometown team. "It's tough to put into words because this team is in my blood. It's genuine," said Foxworth, who regularly checked for the Ravens' score when he played for the Denver Broncos and the Atlanta Falcons. "I'm playing for this city. It's my city. It's the city I grew up in."
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker and Kathleen Parker,kparker@kparker.com | January 9, 2009
When it comes to the six Republicans competing for lead dog of the GOP leadership, all are on point: They love Ronald Reagan, are pro-life, advocate small government and promise more diversity and fewer taxes. They are also, with one exception, locked and loaded - armed in Second Amendment solidarity. During a 90-minute debate this week at the National Press Club, only Michael S. Steele, the former Maryland lieutenant governor, confessed to owning no guns. Say what? In a race where Mr. Steele's conservative bona fides are already held in suspicion, did his admission unseal any deal?
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