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SPORTS
February 18, 2010
Lindsey Vonn, whose training was limited by a severely bruised shin, wins the downhill in Vancouver by more than half a second ahead of silver medalist and American teammate Julia Mancuso. "This is everything I've wanted and hoped for," Vonn said. "I gave up everything for this." PG 3
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SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | June 1, 2013
It didn't take the Detroit Tigers long to remind the Orioles that momentum and a couple of bucks will get you a cup of coffee at Starbucks. The Orioles were flying so high after Friday night's ninth-inning comeback that the air apparently got a little too thin. The big-swinging Tigers pierced the sky four times in an eight-run explosion in the top of the fourth inning that all but evened the series before late-afternoon shadows could reach the pitcher's mound. The assault was so quick and unmerciful that it rendered Tigers ace Justin Verlander almost irrelevant.
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SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 13, 1998
HAKUBA, Japan -- Mountain 1, Skiers 0.That was the count in the most glamorous ski-racing event of the Winter Olympics, the men's downhill. After five days of delays caused by snow, wind, fog, rain and hail, the greatest downhill skiers in the world finally got their chance to race down the Happo'one course.And one by one on Friday the 13th in Japan -- last night in the United States -- they toppled, spun out and crash-landed just before a jump named Alpen.This wasn't a downhill -- it was a downhill disaster, a demolition derby on snow.
SPORTS
By Tom Schad, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2013
Over a tall cup of coffee in Southeast Baltimore, Reed Whiting explains why and how he zips down frozen racetracks in the middle of cities, navigating jumps and turns while jostling with three other racers from around the world. He says he goes as fast as 40 miles per hour in front of more than 100,000 fans and a national television audience. He once canceled a week of appointments at work and booked an $880 overnight flight to Switzerland for the opportunity to compete. "It was a fun little ordeal," Whiting, 33, says.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Correspondent | February 8, 1992
VAL D'ISERE, France -- From a gondola that sways in the winter wind high above the French Alps, the icy course below looms like a white monster that twists and bends and oozes down the side of a mountain.There is a start that launches a skier from 0 to 60 faster than a Porsche, a turn that loops like an S, a set of boulders where only the bravest dare tread, a cluster of stomach-churning dips and an alley so narrow you can imagine a set of bowling pins at one end. And it ends -- 45 gates, 22 turns, four jumps, 3,191 feet lower and 1.8 miles later -- across the street from the La Schuss Bar.This is Face du Bellevarde.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | February 14, 1994
The TV Repairman:Obviously, CBS does not subscribe to the theory of a strong opening act.Pressed into providing additional hours of Winter Olympics coverage Saturday even before the opening ceremonies, the network stumbled and bumbled badly for want of interesting filler.The cause of the dilemma was the cancellation of a basketball game here in the States. At the same time, there wasn't much going on in Lillehammer.So, OK, if the net didn't want to go with meaningful segments out of a spirited hockey game between Finland and the Czech Republic, at least it could have made with a package reviewing the Games held in France just two years ago.Action and competition, that's what viewers tuning in were perhaps expecting to see only to be disappointed with talking heads.
SPORTS
By CHRIS DUFRESNE | February 12, 2006
SESTRIERE, Italy -- The opening ceremony is over and it's downhill from here, starting today with alpine skiing's signature event atop Kandahar Banchetta Giovanni Nasi. Super-Gs are super, the combined is a kick and slaloms are slick, but "Olympic downhill champion" is a designation you take to your grave. Alpine skiing 7 p.m. to 11:30 p.m., chs. 11, 4
SPORTS
By CHRIS DUFRESNE and CHRIS DUFRESNE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 18, 2006
SESTRIERE, Italy -- The wind may not be blowing America's way yet in the Olympic alpine events, but it's definitely blowing. With 3 1/2 events completed in the mountains, the United States has one medal, Ted Ligety's gold in combined, with possibly more wind chill to come. Severe winter weather turned Wednesday's women's combined event upside down. High winds forced the postponement of the shortened downhill in San Sicario Fraiteve after one racer, Croatia's Nika Fleiss, took off on a jump and almost got flipped upside down by a gust.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2002
OGDEN, Utah -- For the past decade, in America's eyes, the sun only shined on one female downhill skier: Picabo Street. Anyone else was just a name, and not much more. Ready or not, that era ended last week when Street skied her final competitive race, finishing 16th in the downhill. She didn't qualify for the U.S. team in the super-G, an event she won at the Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan, in 1998, so she won't be around to defend her title at Snowbasin today at 10 a.m. The biggest beneficiaries of Street's retirement will likely be a quartet of Americans -- Caroline Lalive, Jonna Mendes, Kirsten Clark and Kathleen Monahan.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 7, 1998
HAKUBA, Japan -- Down at a wooden chalet called Austria House, they brought out softball-sized apples covered in corporate logos. They brought out skis and bindings that bent like bananas. They even trotted out three-dozen Olympic athletes who wore goofy grins and carried around skis like lumber.And finally, they brought out the Herminator.This is what it's like to be the hottest ski-racer on the planet, Hermann Maier of Austria.He's a skiing phenomenon and a lounge act, caught up in the wildest, weirdest tale to hit the ski circuit in years.
SPORTS
By Tom Schad, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2013
Cameron Naasz was introduced to ice cross downhill less than two years ago, but already he has become the face - and the future - of the sport in the United States. The 23-year-old finished third in this season's world championship standings. Naasz won the race in Lausanne, Switzerland, this month, finished second in the Niagara Falls, Ontario, event in December and third in St. Paul, Minn., in January. In just his second season of competition, Naasz became the most successful American in the recorded history of ice cross downhill.
NEWS
By John Perrotto, Sports Xchange | March 21, 2012
LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. — Mike Matheny had just answered a reporter's question about the challenges of being a first-year manager when an unexpected situation presented itself. The visiting Cardinals were under the impression that the National League team could continue using a designated hitter in all exhibition games through Wednesday. Yet nearly an hour after they had arrived at Disney's Wide World of Sports, the Cardinals were informed that the host Braves wanted the pitchers to bat in Monday's Grapefruit League game.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | June 18, 2011
— Maybe this should have been obvious before Luke Scott's back seized up during his first at-bat and Brian Matusz hobbled off the field in the sixth inning of the Orioles' 4-2 loss to the Washington Nationals Saturday afternoon, but the 2011 season is hanging by a thread. President of baseball operations Andy MacPhail obviously sensed that, since he alluded to the tenuous nature of his shaky ballclub even before the Orioles took the field for the second game of their interleague series at Nationals Park.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2011
When she plays lacrosse, Mount St. Mary's midfielder Nicole Price still has that excited, little-kid look in her eyes. She just loves the game. Maybe that's because the North Harford graduate has switched through a number of sports during her high school and college careers, keeping each one new and fun. She even took her junior year off from varsity sports to pursue her passion for snowboarding with a winter semester in Utah. Price came back to lacrosse for her senior year this spring refreshed and ready for a breakout season.
SPORTS
February 18, 2010
Lindsey Vonn, whose training was limited by a severely bruised shin, wins the downhill in Vancouver by more than half a second ahead of silver medalist and American teammate Julia Mancuso. "This is everything I've wanted and hoped for," Vonn said. "I gave up everything for this." PG 3
SPORTS
By Chris Dufresne and Tribune Olympic Bureau | February 12, 2010
- Lindsey Vonn caught a bad break last week when a shin injury suffered during slalom training in Austria seemingly jeopardized her chances for achieving Olympic glory at the Vancouver Games. Don't worry: Gray skies are going to clear up? Strangely, Vonn certainly hopes not. Her good break came Thursday when the Whistler weather got worse. A day after she openly wondered whether she would be able to compete in these Olympics, a grungy amalgam of snow, rain and fog forced the cancellation of Vonn's anticipated downhill training run. And that bought her precious healing time in an effort to recast herself as Alpine's multi-medal contender.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2002
OGDEN, Utah - Everyone expected an Austrian skier to win the Olympic men's downhill yesterday. It's just that no one expected it to be Fritz Strobl. Often overlooked thanks to the long shadows cast by famous teammates Stephan Eberharter and Hermann Maier, Strobl skied his best when it mattered most, breezing down "Attacking Grizzly" in 1 minute, 39.13 seconds to capture the gold medal before a crowd of more than 25,000. In doing so, Strobl, a 29-year-old police officer from Gerlamoos, Austria, became the first Olympic downhill champion from that country since Patrick Ortlieb in 1992.
SPORTS
May 6, 1991
BaseballU.S. ski team -- Named Ernst Hager women's downhill coach.
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | February 9, 2010
No, you're not an Olympian. And you don't even play one on TV. Still, you can fake your way to respectability with just a few teaching aids. Here are the movies "Downhill Racer," starring Robert Redford and Gene Hackman, was one of the first movies to use a helmet-mounted camera to give viewers the sense of speed and thrills in the sport of skiing. Redford is the self-centered skier who derides the concept of team. Hackman is the coach who tries to make him conform.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN REPORTER | April 8, 2008
You know it was a bad quarter for stock mutual funds when even Legg Mason's Bill Miller -- whose reputation for stock picking is legend -- ended somewhere near the bottom of the pack. Miller's Value Trust fund lost 19.7 percent in the first quarter, led by untimely bets on technology and telecommunications stocks, such as Sprint Nextel Corp., and Bear Stearns Cos., whose near-collapse and subsequent bailout by JPMorgan Chase & Co. sent markets reeling late in the quarter. It was the fund's worst first quarter since it was established 26 years ago. Miller's slump officially started in 2006, when his record 15-year streak of beating the S&P 500 index was snapped.
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