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Down The River

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By New York Times News Service | August 22, 1993
The upper reaches of the Hudson River ring with the screams of day-tripping rafters during spring runoff, but now there's a more subtle way to float this remote Adirondack waterway. Michael Wilson, who is probably the first guide to run wooden boats through the Hudson River gorge in six decades, is offering two overnight trips in his dories this fall.The dories seat two passengers and are designed to be easily maneuvered in fast-moving water. The first trip is Sept. 17-19. It will focus on fly fishing.
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NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,robert.little@baltsun.com | September 22, 2008
Inside the metal seams of the bridge that carries Interstate 83 over the railroad tracks near Bolton Hill, grass is growing. And a pair of squirrels are apparently nesting in a storm drain underneath 28th Street. These are not the kind of observations one would normally make - nor want to make, since they require lingering on a stretch of asphalt that Baltimoreans typically hope to leave behind at 50 mph or more. But yesterday, the city applied the brakes to speeding motorists along the Jones Falls Expressway.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun reporter | July 12, 2008
HARPERS FERRY, W.VA. - If you're into tubing, this town is your Woodstock. On just about any weekend in the summer, hundreds of tubers can be seen taking lazy, meandering trips down the picturesque Shenandoah and Potomac rivers, many with coolers and beach umbrellas in tow. But we weren't into lazy, OK? We weren't into meandering. We wanted some action. Well, as long as it didn't kill us. So on a recent weekend, my wife, Nancy, and I took a guided white-water tubing trip on the Potomac with River Riders, an outfit that claims to offer the only licensed Class III white-water tubing in the area.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | August 28, 2008
Summer's not officially over when Labor Day hits. But it may as well be. More than winter, more than autumn, more than spring, summer is a state of mind, existing not so much because of the calendar, not so much because of the temperature, but because we close our eyes, exhale and let it happen. After Labor Day, as we become about less vacation and more school, more work, more wearing shoes, summer fades. It evaporates like condensation on a glass of lemonade. But before it's gone for another year, there's one weekend left - a long one. Make it good.
NEWS
By BARBARA MALLONEE | July 6, 1991
My father hung the hammock in the shady side yard on Sunday afternoons when it was too hot to do anything but swing back and forth, watching dragonflies hover over the phlox. ''Cruising down the river,'' my mother sang as she layered baked beans in a steamy kitchen.Pushing the hammock back and forth, grass tickling my foot, I could almost see rowboats drifting along under overarching branches, women in white, hair piled on their heads, trailing their fingers through water while sunburned swains plied the oars.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | August 1, 1998
WHILE A family vacation is rumored to be relaxing, organizing it can be stressful. Right from the get-go, for instance, there is the problem of getting all members of your family to attend.When our kids were small, their participation in a family vacation was not much of an issue. Back then I just strapped them in their seat belts, loaded up the 6,000 pounds of gear that they traveled with, and got out of town.But now that the kids are teen-agers, 17 and 13, they have summer jobs. As a result, getting away for a week requires freeing the kids from their web of responsibilities.
NEWS
By Mary Joslin | January 10, 2001
* Editor's note: A restless girl longs to visit points faraway. When Clara was little, she loved most of all to walk down to the lakeside with her father each morning. She watched as he pushed his heavy rowing-boat out into the calm violet water and set off for his day's work. In the evening, she waited beside the door of their home and looked for his return under a darkening sky. Every night, when he came home, she asked the same question. "When can I come with you to the shore beyond?
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2001
ABOARD THE JAMES RANKIN - Ordinarily, the crew of this 175-foot Coast Guard cutter would be doing maintenance work on the buoys that mark Chesapeake Bay shipping channels. But these are extraordinary times. So, the ship cruises the Potomac River from the Woodrow Wilson Bridge to Haines Point, then sits in the middle of the narrow Washington shipping channel, part of the increased security measures since the terrorist attacks Sept. 11 that killed thousands in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Chantal Hall and Chantal Hall,LONG REACH HIGH SCHOOL | March 11, 2005
One of the most famous characters in American literature is Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn. Daring and mischievous, Huck is the archetype of an incorrigible boy. His many exciting adventures and episodes of trouble are chronicled in the 1985 Tony-winning musical Big River. The story begins in St. Petersburg, Mo., and unfolds along the Mississippi River. Huck escapes his crazed, alcoholic father and stumbles upon Jim, a runaway slave. Together, they venture down the river in search of freedom.
TRAVEL
May 9, 1999
MY BEST SHOTMarket day in FranceBy Mary Jo Murphy, BaltimoreMy younger sister is studying abroad in the small town of Aix en Provence, in the southern part of France. On market day, I hurried toward Place de Precheurs, where stands with colorful canopies sold the bounty of the earth -- fresh fruit and vegetables, flowers in beautiful arrangements, spices, cheeses, breads and pastries. Along the narrow streets were vendors selling clothing, linens, sachets of lavender, antiques, books, artwork, jewelry and crafts.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun reporter | July 12, 2008
HARPERS FERRY, W.VA. - If you're into tubing, this town is your Woodstock. On just about any weekend in the summer, hundreds of tubers can be seen taking lazy, meandering trips down the picturesque Shenandoah and Potomac rivers, many with coolers and beach umbrellas in tow. But we weren't into lazy, OK? We weren't into meandering. We wanted some action. Well, as long as it didn't kill us. So on a recent weekend, my wife, Nancy, and I took a guided white-water tubing trip on the Potomac with River Riders, an outfit that claims to offer the only licensed Class III white-water tubing in the area.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | July 29, 2007
Ayear into Maryland's artificial reef-building program and, on the surface, there's nothing to show for it. That's the way it is with projects that are on the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay. You can't see it, like bay grasses. Or hear it, like the new "smart" buoy at the mouth of the Patapsco River that passes along water quality measurements and history and cultural nuggets to your cell phone and home computer. Or smell it, like wildflower plantings in the Interstate 95 median. But MARI, as the Maryland Artificial Reef Initiative is called, is making progress.
NEWS
By Chantal Hall and Chantal Hall,LONG REACH HIGH SCHOOL | March 11, 2005
One of the most famous characters in American literature is Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn. Daring and mischievous, Huck is the archetype of an incorrigible boy. His many exciting adventures and episodes of trouble are chronicled in the 1985 Tony-winning musical Big River. The story begins in St. Petersburg, Mo., and unfolds along the Mississippi River. Huck escapes his crazed, alcoholic father and stumbles upon Jim, a runaway slave. Together, they venture down the river in search of freedom.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2001
ABOARD THE JAMES RANKIN - Ordinarily, the crew of this 175-foot Coast Guard cutter would be doing maintenance work on the buoys that mark Chesapeake Bay shipping channels. But these are extraordinary times. So, the ship cruises the Potomac River from the Woodrow Wilson Bridge to Haines Point, then sits in the middle of the narrow Washington shipping channel, part of the increased security measures since the terrorist attacks Sept. 11 that killed thousands in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Mary Joslin | January 10, 2001
* Editor's note: A restless girl longs to visit points faraway. When Clara was little, she loved most of all to walk down to the lakeside with her father each morning. She watched as he pushed his heavy rowing-boat out into the calm violet water and set off for his day's work. In the evening, she waited beside the door of their home and looked for his return under a darkening sky. Every night, when he came home, she asked the same question. "When can I come with you to the shore beyond?
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Tom Horton and Heather Dewar and Tom Horton,Sun Staff | September 25, 2000
ST. JAMES PARISH, LA. The breeze blowing from the Mississippi River across sugar cane fields to Emelda West's house carries the sting of ammonia. Since West's girlhood, the nation's densest concentration of fertilizer factories has risen along the river upstream from New Orleans. The two closest to her home are among America's top 25 sources of toxic pollution. Folks in West's neighborhood hardly ever swim in the river anymore. Even in stifling heat, they close their windows to shut out the breeze.
SPORTS
By NANCY NOYES | April 8, 1993
The water was relatively flat on the Severn River Saturday, but a brisk northwesterly breeze near 20 knots and gusting to 30 was hooting down the river as the Navy 44 Flirt, skippered by senior Eric Roetz, beat upriver under full sail at a good rate of speed.Suddenly a crewman was in the frigid water, and as throngs of hushed spectators looked on from the academy seawall, the rest of his team went into action to recover him. Executing an upwind quickstop maneuver calmly and professionally, and promptly returning to their endangered teammate, the crew had sophomore Michael LaPaglia safely aboard again within moments.
NEWS
By Andrew C. Revkin and Andrew C. Revkin,New York Times News Service | July 8, 1999
VERPLANCK, N.Y. -- The Hudson River, which for years was a forgotten waterway between more popular fishing grounds on the Atlantic Coast and the Great Lakes, has become one of the hottest spots for striped bass fishing in the country.The schools of silver-streaked striped bass migrating up the Hudson River on their annual spawning run are cleaner, more plentiful and bigger than they have been in a generation, anglers and New York state biologists say. And sport fishermen from Texas, North Carolina, Michigan and Indiana are contributing to a boom in the charter boat business up and down the river.
TRAVEL
May 9, 1999
MY BEST SHOTMarket day in FranceBy Mary Jo Murphy, BaltimoreMy younger sister is studying abroad in the small town of Aix en Provence, in the southern part of France. On market day, I hurried toward Place de Precheurs, where stands with colorful canopies sold the bounty of the earth -- fresh fruit and vegetables, flowers in beautiful arrangements, spices, cheeses, breads and pastries. Along the narrow streets were vendors selling clothing, linens, sachets of lavender, antiques, books, artwork, jewelry and crafts.
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