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September 11, 2013
"Justice for Ethan" signals a call from the family of Robert Ethan Saylor and all families experiencing Down syndrome (" Reopen the case of Robert Ethan Saylor Sept. 5). Ethan, 26, had Down syndrome. He died when he was being escorted from a movie theater by several off-duty law enforcement officials. Unfortunately, the officers were not trained to interact with an individual with Down syndrome. Families with children who have Down syndrome are calling for additional training of law enforcement officers to learn how to address these types of situations.
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Lisa Driscoll and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
When it comes to thinking about people with Down syndrome, Katie Hudson wants the world to take a cue from her 6-year-old daughter, Maddie. "She always says, 'We're all a little different, and that's what makes us the same,'" Hudson said. "She gets it. " That's why Maddie will be walking in honor of her brother, Logan -- and more than 400 others will make strides for inclusion and awareness for people with Down syndrome -- at the First Annual Baltimore Buddy Walk on Nov. 2 at Padonia Park Club in Cockeysville.
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NEWS
By Theresa Vargas, The Washington Post | March 28, 2013
Robert Ethan Saylor didn't like to be touched, and suddenly an off-duty deputy had his hands on him. Within moments, two more deputies would grab him, the four men would fall in a heap on the floor, and Saylor, who had been shouting and resisting their attempts to restrain him, would grow quiet and still. More than two months after a man with Down syndrome died at the hands of three off-duty Frederick County sheriff's deputies, these details about his death emerged in an autopsy report released this week.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
The mother of a Maryland man with Down syndrome who died in police custody last year told a Senate panel Tuesday that the federal government needs to spend more to train law enforcement on how to approach the disabled and mentally ill. Patti Saylor, whose son, Robert "Ethan" Saylor, died of asphyxiation last January while handcuffed on the ground in a Frederick County movie theater, said more should be done to foster relationships between police...
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | October 19, 1990
With the help of new genetic markers, Johns Hopkins Hospital researchers have found evidence that the chromosome largely responsible for Down's syndrome comes from the mother's egg in 95 percent of children with the disorder.Down's syndrome, which is the most common genetic cause of mental retardation, results from an extra, or third, 21st chromosome contributed at conception. The syndrome occurs in one in 700 births in the United States. Studies have shown that older mothers are at greater risk.
FEATURES
Lisa Driscoll and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
When it comes to thinking about people with Down syndrome, Katie Hudson wants the world to take a cue from her 6-year-old daughter, Maddie. "She always says, 'We're all a little different, and that's what makes us the same,'" Hudson said. "She gets it. " That's why Maddie will be walking in honor of her brother, Logan -- and more than 400 others will make strides for inclusion and awareness for people with Down syndrome -- at the First Annual Baltimore Buddy Walk on Nov. 2 at Padonia Park Club in Cockeysville.
NEWS
By Theresa Vargas, The Washington Post | July 16, 2013
Moments before off-duty Frederick County sheriff's deputies tried to force a young man with Down syndrome out of a movie theater - a move that eventually led to his death - Robert Ethan Saylor's 18-year-old aide warned them that he would "freak out" if they touched him. "Next thing I know, there are I think three or four cops holding Ethan, trying to put him in handcuffs," the aide told authorities, according to documents from the Frederick County...
FEATURES
By Boston Globe | September 1, 1992
By combining three blood tests, doctors can sort out younger pregnant women most likely to be carrying a fetus affected by Down syndrome, according to a recent study.These women can then be offered amniocentesis, the definitive test for the chromosome abnormality.The finding, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, is important because four out of five children with Down syndrome are born to mothers younger than 35. Until now, however, doctors have recommended amniocentesis, a test for detecting a Down's fetus, only to women over 35.The reason is that amniocentesis, which involves sticking a needle into the uterus to retrieve a sample of amniotic fluid, precipitates miscarriage in 1 case out of 200. Among women under 35, the miscarriage risk from amniocentesis is higher than the average likelihood of finding a Down fetus.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 21, 1997
A controversial drug, whose proponents insist it does wonders for children with Down syndrome, is spotlighted on CBS.Dixie Lawrence Tafoya and her adopted daughter, Madison, are at the center of tonight's edition of "48 Hours" (10 p.m.-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13), "Hope or Hype." Determined to see that her daughter, born with Down syndrome, lives as normal a life as possible, Tafoya researched the condition and came up with a treatment that involves Nutrivene D (a combination of vitamins and amino acids)
FEATURES
By Laura Beil and Laura Beil,Dallas Morning News | May 30, 1995
Down syndrome, one of the most commonly recognized causes of mental retardation, has been known to be more common among babies born to older mothers. But growing research suggests that older men may also be at higher risk of having a Down syndrome child.Scientists hope that examinations of paternal age eventually may help explain why this relatively common but largely mysterious birth defect occurs. The new research, some experts say, demonstrates that the condition is not a problem that arises only from the mother's older egg."
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
The parents of a developmentally disabled man who died after being handcuffed at a Frederick County movie theater have sued Regal Cinemas and the county in federal court. The lawsuit filed Thursday also names the county sheriff's office, three deputies and the movie theater as defendants. Robert "Ethan" Saylor, 26, died in January after the incident at the Westview Regal Cinemas at Westview Promenade in Frederick. In the lawsuit, Patricia and Ronald Saylor accuse the defendants of negligence, violating Ethan Saylor's civil rights and violating the Americans with Disabilities Act. "If any of the Defendants had heeded Mr. Saylor's aide as to how to deal with Mr. Saylor, his tragic and unnecessary death would have been avoided," they say. Saylor had Down syndrome and an IQ of about 40, they say, and it was easy to recognize his developmental disability.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley appointed the national head of the Special Olympics as chairman of a new committee that will determine how well law enforcement officers are trained to handle encounters with people with disabilities.  Timothy Shriver, CEO and chairman of the board at the Special Olympics, will lead the committee O'Malley announced Tuesday. It comes nearly two weeks after the family of Robert "Ethan" Saylor asked O'Malley to further investigate Saylor's Jan. 12 death while in custody of Frederick County deputy sheriffs.
NEWS
September 11, 2013
"Justice for Ethan" signals a call from the family of Robert Ethan Saylor and all families experiencing Down syndrome (" Reopen the case of Robert Ethan Saylor Sept. 5). Ethan, 26, had Down syndrome. He died when he was being escorted from a movie theater by several off-duty law enforcement officials. Unfortunately, the officers were not trained to interact with an individual with Down syndrome. Families with children who have Down syndrome are calling for additional training of law enforcement officers to learn how to address these types of situations.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley wants to improve training for law enforcement and other first responders who encounter people with disabilities, an issue raised by the death of a Frederick County man, aides said. O'Malley met for about 45 minutes Thursday with the family of Robert "Ethan" Saylor, a man with Down syndrome whose death in police custody sparked a nationwide Internet campaign dubbed "Justice for Ethan. " The governor did not immediately agree to launch the independent investigation the family requested, though a spokeswoman said he is " exploring all options to ensure that this never happens to another Marylander again.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley will meet today with the family of a Frederick man with Down Syndrome who died in law enforcement custody earlier this year. "The governor wants to make every effort to ensure this never happens to a Marylander again," said Takirra Winfield, a spokeswoman for O'Malley. Robert "Ethan" Saylor, 26, died Jan. 12 after a struggle with off-duty Frederick County sheriff's deputies who were attempting to remove him from a Frederick movie theater. Saylor had finished watching Zero Dark Thirty but tried to stay in the theater to watch it a second time without a ticket.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2013
Del. Heather Mizeur, an announced candidate for governor, urged Gov. Martin O'Malley Tuesday to launch an inquiry into the treatment of disabled people after the death of a man with Down syndrome during a confrontation with sheriff's deputies in Frederick County. Mizeur, a Montgomery County Democrat, urged the governor to work with the General Assembly to develop policies to prevent incidents such as the one that killed 26-year-old Ethan Saylor. Saylor died in January while being arrested by three moonlighting deputies in a theater for attempting to watch a movie for a second time without paying for a new ticket.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1996
A 20-year-old man with Down syndrome who disappeared from a group home in Columbia Thursday morning was found unharmed in Oxon Hill in Prince George's County that night, Howard County police said.Samuel McDaniel was returned to the home in the 6800 block of Happy Heart Lane in Owen Brown village on Thursday night, Sgt. Steven Keller, a police spokesman, said.Keller said Friday that McDaniel, who recently moved to Columbia from Randallstown, was free to come and go from the group home as he pleased.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | May 27, 1992
Traveling to New York could be ho-hum for Duke Goldberg and his wife, Marlene, who jet around the world for his business, International Eyewear Inc. But that was hardly the case when the Baltimore couple went to the Big Apple to attend a luncheon at the Union Club with their 14-year-old daughter Shawn, who was asked to be the Down Syndrome representative.Shawn, an eighth grader at Old Court Middle School, presented the National Down Syndrome Society Professional Women's Humanitarian Award to Eunice Kennedy Shriver for her achievements in the field of mental health, as founder of Special Olympics and executive vice president of the Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. Foundation.
FEATURES
By Tricia Bishop
The Baltimore Sun
| August 1, 2013
Three-year-old Ava McKelvey of Mt. Airy, who has Down syndrome, and her baby brother, Michael, are about to be famous, with a photo of the pair set to appear on a giant screen in New York City 's Times Square to kick off Down Syndrome Awareness Month, which begins in October. The picture -- which shows the red-headed siblings leaning against a hay bale last fall, Ava's hands held in mid-clap -- was chosen from more than 1,000 entries and will flash across the News Corporation Sony Screen with roughly 200 others in a video montage.
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