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By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | September 6, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Dow Corning Corp. today will begin an $8 million advertising campaign alerting customers of their last chance to file injury claims against the company.The 50-50 joint venture of Dow Chemical Inc. and Corning Inc., facing more than 19,000 claims that its silicone-gel breast implants caused injury or disease in women, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in May 1995.Now the company is trying to make hundreds of thousands of potential plaintiffs aware of a Jan. 15, 1997, deadline for all U.S. claims and a Feb. 14, 1997, deadline for claims outside of the U.S."
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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 14, 1998
BOSTON -- To get to the heart of the Silicone Story, you have to go back to the very beginning.Back to postwar Japan where young women trying to attract U.S. soldiers had industrial-strength transformer coolant injected directly into their breasts.Back to Las Vegas where 10,000 women, waitresses and showgirls investing in a topless career had liquid silicone pumped into their bodies as an invisible, internal "falsie."Silicone sinA feminist conspiracy theorist couldn't have written a better story of original silicone sin. It's replete with dark morals about sexual beauty and sexual business, self-sacrifice and self-improvement, women disfigured in pursuit of a better figure.
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BUSINESS
October 13, 1992
Air fares going upMajor airlines plan to raise fares between $10 and $30 on all their routes Thursday, one month after a similar increase ended a summer of cut-rate airplane tickets, airline officials said yesterday. The increase would be about 5 percent.Dow Corning's earnings dropDow Corning Corp. said yesterday its third-quarter profit plummeted 60 percent from a year ago largely because of stagnant economies in many nations where it sells silicone products. Dow Corning earned $16.4 million in the three months ended Sept.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 1998
Dow Corning Corp. and lawyers for women claiming injury from silicone breast implants agreed yesterday to a $3.2 billion settlement, a long-awaited step toward ending one of the most heated disputes in American corporate history.The agreement, which if accepted would end a nearly 10-year legal battle, would allow women seeking damages because of implants to receive money as early as next year.It would enable Dow Corning, a joint venture of Dow Chemical Co. and Corning Inc., to emerge from Chapter 11 bankruptcy, which Dow Corning entered for protection from as many as 19,000 implant-damage suits.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 1998
Dow Corning Corp. and lawyers for women claiming injury from silicone breast implants agreed yesterday to a $3.2 billion settlement, a long-awaited step toward ending one of the most heated disputes in American corporate history.The agreement, which if accepted would end a nearly 10-year legal battle, would allow women seeking damages because of implants to receive money as early as next year.It would enable Dow Corning, a joint venture of Dow Chemical Co. and Corning Inc., to emerge from Chapter 11 bankruptcy, which Dow Corning entered for protection from as many as 19,000 implant-damage suits.
NEWS
February 13, 1992
The Dow Corning Corporation is now learning first-hand a lesson that should have been ingrained in corporate policy. Stonewalling on safety complaints to federal regulators questioning your products' potential hazards is a quick way to the trash heap. That this could happen after Johns Manville Corporation's asbestos debacle, after the Dalkon Shield fiasco bounced the A.H. Robbins Co. into bankruptcy, is astounding.Irresponsibility in high circles put Dow Corning in this position. Thus, it is a prudent move for the company to replace its top executives.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 31, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration, which is expected to announce within days whether it will allow widely used silicone gel breast implants to remain on the market, said yesterday that the biggest manufacturer of the devices has been giving consumers false and misleading information about the implants' safety.The FDA warned Dow Corning Wright Co., based in Midland, Mich., to immediately stop disseminating the false information on its toll-free hot line and ordered the company to notify the agency by Thursday of corrective steps it has taken.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 31, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- The Los Angeles County district attorney opened a criminal investigation yesterday of managers at the nation's leading manufacturer of silicone breast implants, Dow-Corning Wright Corp.Acting under a year-old California law, investigators will seek to learn if company managers knowingly concealed information about dangers of silicone gel implants, said District Attorney Ira Reiner.If found guilty, individual managers could be jailed up to three years, and the company could be fined $1 million, Mr. Reiner said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration has told Dow Corning Corp. to make public approximately 90 documents on silicone gel breast implants, but company officials said yesterday that the company might not comply.Dr. James S. Benson, the chief FDA official in charge of medical devices, told the company that the agency would disclose the documents if the company did not do so by tomorrow.Based on the documents and new information, Dr. David A. Kessler, the FDA commissioner, called for a moratorium Jan. 6 on the sale and use of silicone gel implants.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | November 14, 1991
GAITHERSBURG -- A panel of experts has found that Dow Corning, one of the nation's leading makers of breast implants, failed to provide reasonable proof of the safety of its silicone-filled products.Yesterday's finding, in a 9 to 1 recommendation to the Food and Drug Administration, could lead to the removal of the controversial implants from the market.However, the panel of medical professionals was to resume meeting today to decide whether overriding public health benefits should allow the device to be sold on a limited basis, such as to women undergoing breast reconstruction after cancer surgery.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 19, 1997
A state jury in Louisiana decided yesterday that the Dow Chemical Co. had knowingly deceived women by hiding information about the health risks of silicone used in breast implants.The New Orleans jury, which is hearing the first class-action lawsuit brought against a company involved in the breast implant industry, also found that Dow Chemical had failed to test silicone adequately before it was used in the human body.Yesterday's decision ended the first part of a case that potentially involves the claims of 1,800 women who received breast implants.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | September 6, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Dow Corning Corp. today will begin an $8 million advertising campaign alerting customers of their last chance to file injury claims against the company.The 50-50 joint venture of Dow Chemical Inc. and Corning Inc., facing more than 19,000 claims that its silicone-gel breast implants caused injury or disease in women, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in May 1995.Now the company is trying to make hundreds of thousands of potential plaintiffs aware of a Jan. 15, 1997, deadline for all U.S. claims and a Feb. 14, 1997, deadline for claims outside of the U.S."
NEWS
By Ann G. Sjoerdsma | November 22, 1995
NORFOLK, Va. -- Once again, the ''people's law'' and science have collided in a courtroom. Science and reason are the worse for it. Last month, a jury in Reno, Nevada, ordered Dow Chemical Co. to pay $13.9 million to a woman who claimed her chronic physical maladies -- unspecified fatigue, muscle pain, nerve disorders -- were caused by silicone-gel breast implants that had ruptured.Current medical opinion, based in part on studies by the Mayo Clinic and the Harvard Nurses' Health Study, does not support an association between silicone implants and connective-tissue diseases (lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma)
NEWS
By Katherine Dowling | October 27, 1995
THE OTHER DAY, while examining a 10-year-old for a sports physical, I felt a tubular structure under his scalp and smiled at his father. ''Doesn't need it anymore,'' the dad said, ''Hasn't had a problem with his hydrocephalus in quite a while.'' This child's intelligence had been saved by a silicone drainage device implanted in infancy, when the excess fluid pressing on his baby brain had caused problems.Necessary devicesSooner than we imagine, the supply of silicone for such medical devices -- and for heart pacemakers, intraocular lenses, artificial finger and wrist joints and implantable drug-delivery pumps -- may be severely threatened.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1995
'64 order against Giant voidedThe Federal Trade Commission yesterday set aside a 1964 order against Giant Food Inc. that prohibited the grocery chain from influencing its suppliers. The order stemmed from a 1955 FTC complaint against the company that was upheld by the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals in 1962. The complaint charged the Landover-based grocery chain with inducing its suppliers to offer, or receiving from its suppliers, compensation for promotional services that Giant knew were not equal to terms those suppliers offered other retailers.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1995
Japan cuts key interest rateJapan's central bank said this morning that it was cutting its official discount rate in half to a new historic low of 0.5 percent, effective immediately.The Bank of Japan last cut the key lending rate, which is the rate the central bank charges private banks for funds, to its previous record low of one percent in April.Comsat, News Corp. sign dealBethesda-based Comsat Corp. said yesterday that News Corp. signed 11 leases worth more than $100 million for satellite capacity to distribute programming from the United States and Brazil directly to homes throughout Latin America.
NEWS
By Philip J. Hilts and Philip J. Hilts,New York Times News Service | January 13, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Scientists within Dow Corning Co. urged company officials for years to conduct critical safety studies of its silicone gel breast implants, but the tests were put off for more than a decade, a review of hundreds of company documents shows.The documents, made available to the New York Times from several sources, also suggest that the studies that were done were inadequate. They describe insertion of implants into women before they had been tested in animals and suggest that Dow Corning Wright breast implants might have been tested in animals but not in animal breast tissue.
NEWS
By Philip J. Hilts and Philip J. Hilts,New York Times News Service | March 19, 1992
WASHINGTON -- After months of criticism, the leading maker of silicone gel breast implants, Dow Corning Corp., has decided to bow out of the implant business, government officials said yesterday.The company had no comment but scheduled a news conference at 9 a.m. today in Washington.The current business climate makes it impossible for the company to let such a small part of its business drain resources, the company has reportedly told U.S. officials.Even though the company has held the largest share of the national implant market, about 30 percent, the implant business accounts for less than 1 percent of Dow Corning's annual sales of $1.84 billion.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 5, 1995
The largest medical product liability settlement in history is in danger of unraveling under an unexpectedly large flood of legal claims from women who say they were harmed by silicone breast implants and the threatened bankruptcy of former implant maker Dow Corning Inc.This week, a federal judge said that because of the number of claims, the proposed $4.23 billion global settlement fund agreed to last year may be too small to pay the promised benefits .Dow...
NEWS
By Houston Chronicle | February 16, 1995
HOUSTON -- A jury found Dow Chemical Co. partially liable yesterday in a breast-implant injury case, the first time the industry giant has been held responsible in any legal action over the silicone devices."
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