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NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2000
Two teen-agers were shot and wounded yesterday when a gunman on a bicycle fired into a crowd waiting to enter a basketball game at Frederick Douglass High School near Mondawmin Mall. Police Officer Fred Hannah, who was off-duty, witnessed the shooting and followed the gunman to a house in the 2000 block of Clifton Ave., where he was arrested after a brief stand-off, said Agent Angelique Cook-Hayes, a police spokeswoman. Charges were pending. Police said about 10 teen-agers were in the east parking lot of the West Baltimore school about 4 p.m., preparing to enter a varsity basketball game between Douglass and Northern High, when a male approached on a bicycle.
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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2013
Da'Quan Alexander has been at Douglass High School only a few months, but everybody knows who he is. The senior running back scored the game-winning touchdown in double overtime Saturday that gave the Ducks a 20-14 win over Edmondson that secured the first regional football championship in school history. Alexander and his teammates draw a lot of attention in the hallways of the West Baltimore school, where orange and blue fever surges as the 12-0 Ducks continue their run toward what they hope will be a state championship on Dec. 7 at M&T Bank Stadium.
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NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1998
Naomi Jenkins-Jones, a physics instructor at Douglass High School who was known for her simple goal of "pursuit of teaching excellence," died Wednesday of a heart attack at the University of Maryland Medical Center.Mrs. Jones, 50, of Reservoir Hill was trained as a chemist and had taught physics and science at the West Baltimore school since 1993."She loved making the difference. She had a relentless pursuit to be the best and for her students to be the best," said her sister, Devora Jenkins-Whiting of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Justin Fenton and Baltimore Sun reporters | January 12, 2010
A teenage boy was shot in the face Tuesday evening on a median strip between Frederick Douglass High School and Mondawmin Mall and was taken by a city Fire Department ambulance to Sinai Hospital, authorities said. His identity and condition were not available, police said. First reports were that a fight occurred between at least two males attending a basketball game between Douglass and Patterson about 7 p.m. and that shots were fired in the school. Anthony Guglielmi, a city police spokesman, and Edie House Foster, a spokeswoman for the city schools, said the victim was not shot in the school but on a median strip in the 2300 block of Gwynns Fall Parkway, between the school and the mall.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1996
State efforts to reform Baltimore's public schools will be vehemently rebuffed, say organizers of a Sept. 19 rally designed to show community opposition to what they see as a state takeover.With about 50 Douglass High School students in the background, speakers at a news conference on the school's lawn yesterday put state officials on notice that they believe Baltimore will not agree to have Annapolis run its schools.The speakers represented a variety of the 14 groups sponsoring the rally, including the Baltimore City Teachers Union, and neighborhood, religious and parental organizations.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1997
Rose Backus-Davis spots the offender from 10 yards away, but she doesn't say a word.She just points a long orange fingernail at the student as he walks down the hall past her, wearing a hat. Off it comes.No hats are allowed at Frederick Douglass High School. And Principal Davis expects students to obey the rules, learning what will be expected of them when they leave the walls of the school. So as students catch sight of her, they pull their hats off. It's that or buy them back from her.It is an example of how far Douglass has come in the past 2 1/2 years, since Davis took over a school where students commonly ran the halls and ignored authority.
TOPIC
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2004
Next month, Charles McDaniels will graduate from Frederick Douglass High School, the alma mater of civil rights attorney and former Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. McDaniels' graduation date will come 50 years and a month after Marshall, then the chief counsel for the NAACP, won his historic fight to desegregate Douglass and every other public school in America. Marshall argued that integrated schools would offer more academic opportunities for blacks and more social possibilities for both blacks and whites.
NEWS
May 14, 1997
Margaret Loggins, 84, homemakerMargaret Loggins, a homemaker and lifelong Baltimorean, died of complications of a stroke Saturday at Sinai Hospital. She was 84.The former Margaret Briscoe, who graduated from Douglass High School in 1930, married Ernest Loggins in 1943.Services will be held at 11 a.m. today at Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses, 901 W. Mulberry St.Survivors include her husband; two sons, Donald Rice of Washington and Ernest Loggins Jr. of Baltimore; two daughters, Dolores Jones and Ernestine Baldwin, both of Baltimore; a sister, Alverta Parker of Brooklyn, N.Y.; 19 grandchildren; and 11 great-grandchildren.
NEWS
February 4, 2005
On Thursday, January 27, 2005 Lieutenant Colonel, WILLIAM DALLAS "BILL" WOODSON, US Army (Ret.) of Sterling, VA, graduate of Douglass High School and Morgan State College. Father of William G. Woodson, Paulo Martini Freyesleben and Annie Elizabeth F. Ryan; brother of Mary Virginia Starghill and Charles E. Woodson. Also survived by four grandchildren, a nieces Kathleen and two nephews Kyle and Ainsley. A Memorial Service will be held at MURPHY'S FALLS CHURCH FUNERAL HOME, 1102 W. Broad St., (Rte.
NEWS
April 16, 2008
David Lofton, 17, of the 500 block of N. Fremont Ave., a Frederick Douglass High School student, has been arrested and charged with attempted murder in the stabbing Monday afternoon of a fellow student in a school bathroom, police said. Police were initially trying to determine whether the injury was accidental or intentional. The victim, whose name was not released, was treated at University of Maryland Medical Center. His condition was not available, but he was expected to survive.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 28, 2009
Norvice G. Penny, an educator who later was director of human relations for Baltimore County Public Schools and who worked tirelessly to improve race and community relations as well as the quality of education for all students, died of congestive heart failure Sept. 18 at Northwest Hospital Center. The longtime Lochearn resident was 76. "I would give Norvice the credit for ushering Baltimore County schools into diversity and minority recognition and providing full equality to all students and the broader community.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Peter.hermann@baltsun.com | September 3, 2009
Second of two parts The different-colored uniforms tell the story. They converge at Mondawmin Mall from Frederick Douglass High School, just a few blocks away and connected with a walkway built over the Gwynns Falls Parkway. They come from Carver, 10 blocks farther south, and from high schools from northwest to northeast and south to north. It's a transit hub for 11 bus lines and the subway, and a daily afternoon meeting spot for teens heading home from school, their competing white, green, blue and orange shirts filling the parking lot and the bus depots, many milling about waiting for the mall's afternoon curfew to end at 4 p.m. The place also is a meeting spot for officers from three agencies - the Maryland Transit Administration and city and school police - who try to keep the kids moving while watching for trouble.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | March 6, 2009
There was Michael Steele on national TV the other day, slamming Baltimore's Frederick Douglass High School for failing black kids, the same ones he failed after making a dramatic personal vow three years ago to get the school fixed. And there was Doc Cheatham on local radio yesterday, announcing he'd gotten the Maryland Historical Society to take down a monkey mural because he thought the stripes on the animals' heads looked like cornrows. You have to wonder which America needs more: public figures who raise real issues but do nothing about them, or those who get silly things done.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,sara.neufeld@baltsun.com | March 5, 2009
City schools chief Andres Alonso publicly asked Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele last night to apologize for making disparaging remarks about Frederick Douglass High School on national television. A spokesman for Steele, Maryland's former lieutenant governor, did not immediately respond to requests for comment. In February 2006, Steele visited Douglass in West Baltimore, holding it up as an example of the failures of urban education and making a personal commitment to turn the school around.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | February 8, 2009
Ken Jackson, the veteran Baltimore radio broadcaster who is host of In the Mood, a weekly three-hour Big Band radio show that airs over WYPR on Friday evenings, called me the other day and, in the course of our discussion, mentioned the name of Chuck Richards. "Did you know that Chuck sang with Fletcher Henderson?" said Jackson. I said I never knew that. In fact, I knew nothing about his past during the glory days when Americans fell in love, swayed, and jumped and jived to the music of the Big Bands.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Nicole Fuller and Frederick N. Rasmussen and,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com and fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 4, 2009
Lewis Herbert Richardson Jr., an educator in the Baltimore school system for more than three decades, died Jan. 25 of Parkinson's disease at Augsburg Lutheran Home in Lochearn. The longtime Northwest Baltimore resident was 80. Dr. Richardson was born in Baltimore in 1928, the eldest of four children, and graduated in 1946 from Douglass High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in mathematics and biology in 1950 from Lincoln University in Pennsylvania. He later earned a master's degree in administration and supervision from Loyola College, and in 1982 earned a doctorate in education from the University of Maryland.
NEWS
November 8, 2003
Gladys Ann Sims, a retired educator, died of pneumonia Nov. 1 at the Mariner Health of Catonsville. The former Walbrook resident was 92. Born in Baltimore and raised on Druid Hill Avenue, she was a 1927 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School and earned a history degree from Howard University in 1931. She also studied at New York University. In 1938, she married Cicero Hill Sims, a contractor, who died in 1957. Mrs. Sims taught English and other subjects at Douglass High School, the old Harvey Johnson Junior High at Hill and Sharp streets and the old Jane Addams School at Calvert and 23rd streets before her retirement about 25 years ago. She traveled widely.
NEWS
February 18, 1998
William L. Ames Jr., 70, postal workerWilliam L. Ames Jr., a retired postal worker and lifelong Baltimorean, died of cancer Sunday at his West Baltimore home. He was 70.He joined the U.S. Postal Service in 1951 and retired in 1983. He later worked as a courier for First National Bank of Maryland from 1986 to 1993.Mr. Ames graduated from Douglass High School in 1945 and attended then-Morgan State College.He enjoyed listening to jazz, playing cards and reading. He was a member of the National Alliance of Postal and Federal Employees, the Forest Park Senior Center and the Frederick Douglass High School Alumni Association.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,sara.neufeld@baltsun.com | December 12, 2008
The retired Army officer who has been chief of staff to Baltimore schools chief Andres Alonso has resigned. Maj. Gen. Bennie Williams is leaving Dec. 31 "to pursue personal interests," according to a statement yesterday. Spokeswoman Edie House described Williams as a "quiet but effective" leader whose military experience brought organizational structure to city schools. House said he helped implement decentralized school funding and oversaw back-to-school logistics. "It's hard to find people with his integrity and dedication," said Alonso, who hired Williams in the summer of 2007.
NEWS
By Andres Alonso | August 25, 2008
Today, the first day of the 2008-2009 school year, is the most important day of the year. And hands down, it is the most important first day in years for Baltimore City Public Schools. Our kids are making historic progress, and we as a school system are in the midst of unprecedented change. As never before, we have the opportunity, momentum and responsibility to turn the city schools into the system of great schools our 81,300 great kids who arrive at school today - with pencils, notebooks and new energy - deserve.
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