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By CARL T. ROWAN | September 18, 1991
Washington. -- The announcement by Virginia's Gov. L. Douglas Wilder that he is running for the presidency has provoked some people to declare him ''nuts,'' a black guy on a colossal ''ego trip'' into a ''white world.''The TV stations present, ad nauseam, black people declaring that ''this country isn't ready for a black president.''My reaction is restrained by my remembrance that I thought Mr. Wilder was a pipe-dreamer when he ran for governor of Virginia in 1989. I figured the first black person to win a governorship sure wouldn't be in the conservative former cradle of the confederacy.
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FEATURES
November 7, 1997
Today in history: Nov. 7In 1874, the Republican Party was symbolized as an elephant in a cartoon by Thomas Nast in Harper's Weekly magazine.In 1916, Republican Jeannette Rankin of Montana became the first woman elected to Congress.In 1917, Russia's Bolshevik Revolution took place as forces led by Vladimir Ilyich Lenin overthrew the provisional government of Alexander Kerensky.In 1967, Carl Stokes was elected the first black mayor of a major city -- Cleveland, Ohio.In 1989, L. Douglas Wilder of Virginia became the first elected black governor in U.S. history; David N. Dinkins was elected New York City's first black mayor.
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NEWS
November 14, 1991
By a significant plurality, callers to SUNDIAL think the eventual Democratic presidential nominee will be one who has not announced his candidacy, Mario Cuomo. Out of 270 calls, the New York governor polled 110, or 40.7 percent.Totals for the six announced hopefuls are, in order: Sen. Bob Kerrey of Nebraska, 51 votes (18.8 percent); Sen. Tom Harkin of Iowa, 30 (11.1 percent); Gov. L. Douglas Wilder of Virginia, 26 (9.6 percent); Gov. Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown Jr. of California, 23 (8.5 percent)
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | February 16, 1993
In yesterday's Today section, the wrong date was given for the Frederick Douglass convocation at Morgan State University. The ceremony, honoring Carl Rowan and Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder, will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow.+ The Sun regrets the errors.Carl Rowan remembers well the first time he saw Thurgood Marshall in action. It was 1953, and Mr. Rowan, a young reporter for the Minneapolis Tribune, was invited to New York for a meeting held by the NAACP, of which Marshall was general counsel.
FEATURES
November 7, 1997
Today in history: Nov. 7In 1874, the Republican Party was symbolized as an elephant in a cartoon by Thomas Nast in Harper's Weekly magazine.In 1916, Republican Jeannette Rankin of Montana became the first woman elected to Congress.In 1917, Russia's Bolshevik Revolution took place as forces led by Vladimir Ilyich Lenin overthrew the provisional government of Alexander Kerensky.In 1967, Carl Stokes was elected the first black mayor of a major city -- Cleveland, Ohio.In 1989, L. Douglas Wilder of Virginia became the first elected black governor in U.S. history; David N. Dinkins was elected New York City's first black mayor.
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | September 19, 1991
Anne Arundel County got an early taste of the 1992 presidential campaign yesterday, as Democratic hopeful Sen. Tom Harkin swung into Linthicum to speak with more than 200 state union leadersIowa's Harkin, who joined the race Sunday, launched a strong class-based attacks against the foreign and domestic policies of President "George Herbert Walker Bush" and Vice President "J. Danforth Quayle," whose supply-side, trickle-down economic policies, he said, have...
NEWS
December 17, 1991
The Democratic presidential candidates who made their national debuts Sunday in the first of a series of NBC television debates were a less contentious bunch than their predecessors of four Decembers ago. That may be explained by the fact that while they disagree on basic tactics of campaigning, they agree on strategy. They all want to attract the middle-class voters who have drifted away from the party in the past two decades.All, that is, except Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown. We don't know what he wants.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | February 16, 1993
In yesterday's Today section, the wrong date was given for the Frederick Douglass convocation at Morgan State University. The ceremony, honoring Carl Rowan and Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder, will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow.+ The Sun regrets the errors.Carl Rowan remembers well the first time he saw Thurgood Marshall in action. It was 1953, and Mr. Rowan, a young reporter for the Minneapolis Tribune, was invited to New York for a meeting held by the NAACP, of which Marshall was general counsel.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | December 9, 1991
New York--The Census Bureau reported the other day than in the year 1990, more than 100,000 white people married black people in the United States. That was seen as quite something, three times as many black-white marriages as there were in 1970, and it was duly noted on the front page of the New York Times.I suppose that constitutes progress, an affirmation of a bit more tolerance, but not all that much in a nation of 250 million. Whites and blacks have lived together here for more than 300 years, at least 10 generations, and black-white marriages count for only four out of each thousand marriages -- 0.04 percent.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | January 13, 1992
MANCHESTER, N.H. -- Jesse Jackson heads to New Hampshire today positioned once again to be a major power broker and a potentially divisive force in Democratic presidential politics.With the withdrawal of Virginia Gov. Douglas Wilder, Jackson, who won 7 million votes in 1988, regains his undisputed role as the nation's most influential black politician.When he speaks at a homeless shelter here today, his every word will be scrutinized by Democratic strategists, party leaders and the presidential candidates themselves.
NEWS
December 17, 1991
The Democratic presidential candidates who made their national debuts Sunday in the first of a series of NBC television debates were a less contentious bunch than their predecessors of four Decembers ago. That may be explained by the fact that while they disagree on basic tactics of campaigning, they agree on strategy. They all want to attract the middle-class voters who have drifted away from the party in the past two decades.All, that is, except Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown. We don't know what he wants.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | December 9, 1991
New York--The Census Bureau reported the other day than in the year 1990, more than 100,000 white people married black people in the United States. That was seen as quite something, three times as many black-white marriages as there were in 1970, and it was duly noted on the front page of the New York Times.I suppose that constitutes progress, an affirmation of a bit more tolerance, but not all that much in a nation of 250 million. Whites and blacks have lived together here for more than 300 years, at least 10 generations, and black-white marriages count for only four out of each thousand marriages -- 0.04 percent.
NEWS
November 14, 1991
By a significant plurality, callers to SUNDIAL think the eventual Democratic presidential nominee will be one who has not announced his candidacy, Mario Cuomo. Out of 270 calls, the New York governor polled 110, or 40.7 percent.Totals for the six announced hopefuls are, in order: Sen. Bob Kerrey of Nebraska, 51 votes (18.8 percent); Sen. Tom Harkin of Iowa, 30 (11.1 percent); Gov. L. Douglas Wilder of Virginia, 26 (9.6 percent); Gov. Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown Jr. of California, 23 (8.5 percent)
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | September 19, 1991
Anne Arundel County got an early taste of the 1992 presidential campaign yesterday, as Democratic hopeful Sen. Tom Harkin swung into Linthicum to speak with more than 200 state union leadersIowa's Harkin, who joined the race Sunday, launched a strong class-based attacks against the foreign and domestic policies of President "George Herbert Walker Bush" and Vice President "J. Danforth Quayle," whose supply-side, trickle-down economic policies, he said, have...
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | September 18, 1991
Washington. -- The announcement by Virginia's Gov. L. Douglas Wilder that he is running for the presidency has provoked some people to declare him ''nuts,'' a black guy on a colossal ''ego trip'' into a ''white world.''The TV stations present, ad nauseam, black people declaring that ''this country isn't ready for a black president.''My reaction is restrained by my remembrance that I thought Mr. Wilder was a pipe-dreamer when he ran for governor of Virginia in 1989. I figured the first black person to win a governorship sure wouldn't be in the conservative former cradle of the confederacy.
NEWS
December 17, 1991
Sen. Bob Kerrey of Nebraska topped the SUNDIAL poll with the most favorable response and least negative response from callers who rated the six Democratic presidential candidates after their televised debate.Asked to say who impressed them the most, 460 callers responded this way: Kerrey, 215 (46 percent); Gov. Bill Clinton of Arkansas, 113 (24 percent); former Gov. Jerry Brown of California, 42 (9 percent); Gov. Douglas Wilder of Virginia, 34 (7 percent); and former Sen. Paul Tsongas of Massachusetts and Sen. Tom Harkin of Iowa, tied with 28 (6 percent)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik lJB | December 13, 1991
Live coverage of Sunday's debate involving six Democratic candidates for president will be carried from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. exclusively on NBC (WMAR-TV, Channel 2, locally). It will be simulcast on National Public Radio, carried in this area on WAMU-FM (88.5) and WJHU-FM (88.1).The 90-minute session from a Washington studio will be moderated by Tom Brokaw, the sole questioner. The format will cover foreign and domestic issues, addressed by the declared Democratic candidates: Edmund G. Brown Jr. of California, Bill Clinton of Arkansas, Tom Harkin of Iowa, Bob Kerrey of Nebraska, Paul Tsongas of Massachusetts and L. Douglas Wilder of Virginia.
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