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By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1997
Motorists traveling past the Baptist Home on Park Heights Avenue in the Green Spring Valley probably have no idea that the estate, known as Rainbow Hill, was once home to Gen. Douglas MacArthur and one of Hollywood's early horror actors.MacArthur lived there with his first wife, Henriette Louise Cromwell Brooks, during the 1920s, when he was named commander of the 3rd Corps Area with headquarters at Fort Meade.MacArthur became well-known and admired by Baltimoreans when he was named chief of staff of the 42nd or "Rainbow Division," during World War I, when the first Maryland unit, the 117th Trench Mortar Battalion, was called for duty overseas in 1917.
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NEWS
April 21, 2006
The reaction to the so-called generals' revolt is getting ridiculous. President Bush and Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and Mr. Rumsfeld's loyal cadre of top officers have gone to such lengths to defend the Pentagon chief from attacks by a handful of retired generals that you can't help but wonder whether the home-grown insurgents haven't hit a nerve. He's starting to look like the secretary of defensiveness. Any sensible American should feel slightly uneasy when military men (even if they're out of the service)
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NEWS
By Edward Lee and Tom Bowman and Edward Lee and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1995
Nothing surprises retired Vice Admiral John D. Bulkeley anymore.Not the Japanese cruiser that nearly caught Admiral Bulkeley and Gen. Douglas MacArthur, the general's family and senior commanders as they escaped from the Philippines in 1942.Not Robert Montgomery's portrayal of the admiral as then-PT skipper "John Brickley" in the movie, "They Were Expendable."And not the bust that the Naval Academy dedicated yesterday morning at the school's planetarium."I wasn't surprised," the admiral said.
NEWS
By Peter Wallsten and Tony Perry and Peter Wallsten and Tony Perry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2005
CORONADO, Calif. - Nearing the end of a vacation month dominated by antiwar protests outside his Texas home, a rising death toll in Iraq and sagging poll numbers, President Bush yesterday invoked the anniversary of the Japanese surrender in World War II and the postwar rebirth of that country as a historic parallel to present-day U.S. efforts in the Middle East. Bush spoke before a backdrop of the Ronald Reagan, the 1,092-foot, nuclear-powered aircraft carrier stationed at the North Island Naval Air Station, drawing repeated applause from an audience of Marines, Navy seamen and World War II veterans.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2001
The Baptist Home, one of the area's oldest retirement communities, will close next month and turn over its sprawling Green Spring Valley mansion - once the home of Gen. Douglas MacArthur - to a bank to which it owes more than $1 million. Financial problems arose last year after the owner, Baptist Home of Maryland/Delaware Inc., borrowed more than $2 million from Allfirst Bank to build a facility in Laurel. However, that project lost state approval, and the money could not be repaid completely, said Carolyn Jackson, president of the board of directors.
NEWS
October 4, 1997
Elma L. Byler Meyer, 84, Army nurse for MacArthurElma L. Byler Meyer, a former Army nurse whose patients included Army Gen. John "Black Jack" Pershing, Gen. Douglas MacArthur and Japanese war time premier Gen. Hideki Tojo, died Sept. 18 of congestive heart failure at College View Nursing Home in Frederick. She was 84.Born Elma Lois Byler Yoder in Belleville, Pa., she earned a bachelor's degree in nursing in 1935 from Mennonite School of Nursing in La Junta, Colo.She was an orthopedic and psychiatric nurse in Philadelphia until November, 1941, when she enlisted in the Army Nurse Corps.
FEATURES
June 2, 2004
In ill health during the last years of his life, author William Manchester lamented his lost capacity to do what had once struck him as effort-less. Manchester, who died yesterday at 82, once said writing used to be as easy as breathing for him. Maybe he breathed better than most human beings, too. His writing wits muscular and lyrical, vMd in its imagery and often wrenching in its emotional import. From 1947 to 1954, he was a staff writer at The Evening Sun and The Sun. He left newspapering behind - eventually he would gain renown for his books, including classic biographies of Winston Churchill and Douglas MacArthur - but Man-chester remained a prodigious reporter, indefatigable researcher and penetrating observer.
NEWS
April 21, 2006
The reaction to the so-called generals' revolt is getting ridiculous. President Bush and Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and Mr. Rumsfeld's loyal cadre of top officers have gone to such lengths to defend the Pentagon chief from attacks by a handful of retired generals that you can't help but wonder whether the home-grown insurgents haven't hit a nerve. He's starting to look like the secretary of defensiveness. Any sensible American should feel slightly uneasy when military men (even if they're out of the service)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 12, 2003
WASHINGTON - In the first detailed public discussion of the Bush administration's plans for a postwar Iraq, senior officials told Congress yesterday that it would take more than two years for the U.S. military to transfer control of Iraq's government to Iraqi leaders. The officials, seeking to demonstrate to skeptical senators that the administration's planning was well advanced, outlined a long list of steps for administering and democratizing Iraq after the ouster of Saddam Hussein. Those would include finding and destroying Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, eliminating terrorist cells, starting economic reconstruction projects, purging Baathist leaders from the bureaucracy, protecting oil fields and securing the country's borders - particularly with Iran.
NEWS
By Peter Wallsten and Tony Perry and Peter Wallsten and Tony Perry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2005
CORONADO, Calif. - Nearing the end of a vacation month dominated by antiwar protests outside his Texas home, a rising death toll in Iraq and sagging poll numbers, President Bush yesterday invoked the anniversary of the Japanese surrender in World War II and the postwar rebirth of that country as a historic parallel to present-day U.S. efforts in the Middle East. Bush spoke before a backdrop of the Ronald Reagan, the 1,092-foot, nuclear-powered aircraft carrier stationed at the North Island Naval Air Station, drawing repeated applause from an audience of Marines, Navy seamen and World War II veterans.
FEATURES
June 2, 2004
In ill health during the last years of his life, author William Manchester lamented his lost capacity to do what had once struck him as effort-less. Manchester, who died yesterday at 82, once said writing used to be as easy as breathing for him. Maybe he breathed better than most human beings, too. His writing wits muscular and lyrical, vMd in its imagery and often wrenching in its emotional import. From 1947 to 1954, he was a staff writer at The Evening Sun and The Sun. He left newspapering behind - eventually he would gain renown for his books, including classic biographies of Winston Churchill and Douglas MacArthur - but Man-chester remained a prodigious reporter, indefatigable researcher and penetrating observer.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 12, 2003
WASHINGTON - In the first detailed public discussion of the Bush administration's plans for a postwar Iraq, senior officials told Congress yesterday that it would take more than two years for the U.S. military to transfer control of Iraq's government to Iraqi leaders. The officials, seeking to demonstrate to skeptical senators that the administration's planning was well advanced, outlined a long list of steps for administering and democratizing Iraq after the ouster of Saddam Hussein. Those would include finding and destroying Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, eliminating terrorist cells, starting economic reconstruction projects, purging Baathist leaders from the bureaucracy, protecting oil fields and securing the country's borders - particularly with Iran.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2001
The Baptist Home, one of the area's oldest retirement communities, will close next month and turn over its sprawling Green Spring Valley mansion - once the home of Gen. Douglas MacArthur - to a bank to which it owes more than $1 million. Financial problems arose last year after the owner, Baptist Home of Maryland/Delaware Inc., borrowed more than $2 million from Allfirst Bank to build a facility in Laurel. However, that project lost state approval, and the money could not be repaid completely, said Carolyn Jackson, president of the board of directors.
NEWS
October 4, 1997
Elma L. Byler Meyer, 84, Army nurse for MacArthurElma L. Byler Meyer, a former Army nurse whose patients included Army Gen. John "Black Jack" Pershing, Gen. Douglas MacArthur and Japanese war time premier Gen. Hideki Tojo, died Sept. 18 of congestive heart failure at College View Nursing Home in Frederick. She was 84.Born Elma Lois Byler Yoder in Belleville, Pa., she earned a bachelor's degree in nursing in 1935 from Mennonite School of Nursing in La Junta, Colo.She was an orthopedic and psychiatric nurse in Philadelphia until November, 1941, when she enlisted in the Army Nurse Corps.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1997
Motorists traveling past the Baptist Home on Park Heights Avenue in the Green Spring Valley probably have no idea that the estate, known as Rainbow Hill, was once home to Gen. Douglas MacArthur and one of Hollywood's early horror actors.MacArthur lived there with his first wife, Henriette Louise Cromwell Brooks, during the 1920s, when he was named commander of the 3rd Corps Area with headquarters at Fort Meade.MacArthur became well-known and admired by Baltimoreans when he was named chief of staff of the 42nd or "Rainbow Division," during World War I, when the first Maryland unit, the 117th Trench Mortar Battalion, was called for duty overseas in 1917.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Tom Bowman and Edward Lee and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1995
Nothing surprises retired Vice Admiral John D. Bulkeley anymore.Not the Japanese cruiser that nearly caught Admiral Bulkeley and Gen. Douglas MacArthur, the general's family and senior commanders as they escaped from the Philippines in 1942.Not Robert Montgomery's portrayal of the admiral as then-PT skipper "John Brickley" in the movie, "They Were Expendable."And not the bust that the Naval Academy dedicated yesterday morning at the school's planetarium."I wasn't surprised," the admiral said.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | May 28, 1995
FUKUOKA, JAPAN -- "I could never again wear a white smock," says Dr. Toshio Tono, dressed in a white running jacket at his hospital and recalling events of 50 years ago. "It's because the prisoners thought that we were doctors, since they could see the white smocks, that they didn't struggle. They never dreamed they would be dissected."The prisoners were eight American airmen, knocked out of the sky over southern Japan during the waning months of World War II, and then torn apart organ by organ while they were still alive.
NEWS
April 10, 1999
Frank O. Cordeiro Jr.,73, who took photographs of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and Gen. Douglas MacArthur signing the Japanese surrender aboard the USS Missouri, died Monday in Trail, Ore.
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