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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
The top of my Douglas fir is dead. What killed it? It's a native tree, so shouldn't it grow well? If I cut off the top will it grow back? Douglas fir (a Pseudotsuga, not a real fir) is native to the Rocky Mountains and the West Coast, very different environments from Maryland with its high temperatures, humidity and drought. Even Maryland has vastly different climatic regions. When you seek a compatible plant and find "native" on the label, be sure it's native to your region.
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NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
The top of my Douglas fir is dead. What killed it? It's a native tree, so shouldn't it grow well? If I cut off the top will it grow back? Douglas fir (a Pseudotsuga, not a real fir) is native to the Rocky Mountains and the West Coast, very different environments from Maryland with its high temperatures, humidity and drought. Even Maryland has vastly different climatic regions. When you seek a compatible plant and find "native" on the label, be sure it's native to your region.
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NEWS
By Joyce S. Brown | December 17, 1996
We consider hanging lightsand decorationson our ficus tree this year;no children will be here --they're over 30; they all work,and Christmas comesmidweek. The pricetag on one Douglas firastounds us annually,especially when, New Year's Day,we toss it out,long after it has droppedits load of needles on our floor.*It seems we just packedall the ornaments away and sangthe Wassail and God Rest Ye.But Joy to the World, we singin the car on the way to the lot wherea scout troop is selling fir trees.
FEATURES
By SARAH YURGEALITIS and SARAH YURGEALITIS,SUN REPORTER | November 26, 2005
A favorite tradition of the Christmas season is going to pick a tree. Driving to a tree farm and felling your own makes for a festive outing. Whether you like them short or tall, round or slim, Scotch pine or blue spruce, Maryland's tree farms probably have a tree just right for you. Many open for business this weekend (call ahead to make sure) and close only when this year's crop of trees runs out. Most provide saws and help getting your tree securely atop the car. Prices vary, and some farms offer other greenery, food and hot drinks.
NEWS
By YVONNE BASKIN | December 20, 1992
Encinitas, California.--In a greenhouse in Madison, Wisconsin, a row of ordinary-looking six-inch spruce trees may represent the ghosts of Christmas future. These tiny trees are clones of superior white spruces, fortified with a bacterial gene for pest resistance and rooted in soil after long incubation in a lab dish.They represent only the second success scientists have had in regrowing conifers (cone-bearing trees) from genetically engineered embryos. The first came last year at Michigan Technological University with a European larch, and similar manipulations of fir and pine are close behind.
FEATURES
By SARAH YURGEALITIS and SARAH YURGEALITIS,SUN REPORTER | November 26, 2005
A favorite tradition of the Christmas season is going to pick a tree. Driving to a tree farm and felling your own makes for a festive outing. Whether you like them short or tall, round or slim, Scotch pine or blue spruce, Maryland's tree farms probably have a tree just right for you. Many open for business this weekend (call ahead to make sure) and close only when this year's crop of trees runs out. Most provide saws and help getting your tree securely atop the car. Prices vary, and some farms offer other greenery, food and hot drinks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Lidard and Meredith Lidard,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
You might think deciding between an artificial tree and a natural one is the hard part. But if you go natural, the decision-making is only just beginning: Do you buy pre-cut or do you want to cut your own? Fir, scotch or pine? And, of course, where do you want to go to buy your tree? To help you find that perfect tree for your space, check out LIVE's guide to some of the local choose-and-cut Christmas tree farms. ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY Friendship Trees (6950 Old Solomons Island Road, Friendship)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2004
A van full of tree hunters crisscrossed Carroll County last week searching towns, farms and subdivisions for the county's first official holiday pine. They took notes and measurements, placing the tallest hunter next to each specimen to gauge tree stature. They finally settled on a 22-foot tall Douglas fir that, until recently, towered over a Hampstead back lot. But, because of rush-hour traffic and fading sunlight, the finely shaped evergreen almost missed the final cut. Its trip to the county office building in Westminster started earlier this month, when the county commissioners appealed for a tree donation.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1995
Everyone is looking for just the right Christmas tree.Pulling off her gloves, Shirley Crow slowly feels the needles.Diane Leicht sticks her head close to the boughs and inhales.Burke Walker walks several feet away from the tree and then turns around, trying to judge the long-distance effect.In the end, the choice of a Christmas tree is as much a mix of gut instinct and family tradition as it is a beauty contest."Everybody has their own opinion of the perfect tree," said Bill Sullivan, a worker at Valley View Farms in Cockeysville, where browsers began scouting out favorites the day after Thanksgiving.
FEATURES
By Wayne Hardin and Wayne Hardin,Staff Writer | December 14, 1992
Bethlehem -- Toy soldiers, 4 feet tall, stood along the horseshoe-shaped driveway of the Messick House. Candy cane decorations flanked the front walk. Two wooden angels stood on each side of the front door bearing a poster that read: "Let the door open wide to welcome the Christmas season inside."The Christmas wonderland of Charles and Susan Wranik Head waited just on the other side of the brass door knocker. This weekend, a few hundred children and adults came calling for the Heads' annual open house for local residents and invited guests.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2004
No more. That's what she told herself that last time in jail. Octavia Teal, 34, had been in and out of the Baltimore City Detention Center so many times that she likes to say jokingly, "They probably got my name on a wall there for best attendance." But after getting caught with drugs while on parole and thrown back in jail this year, she decided, "This time when I come home, I'm not going to go back to using anymore." She was going to get clean and be a mom to children who, thanks to drugs, she hardly knew.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Lidard and Meredith Lidard,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
You might think deciding between an artificial tree and a natural one is the hard part. But if you go natural, the decision-making is only just beginning: Do you buy pre-cut or do you want to cut your own? Fir, scotch or pine? And, of course, where do you want to go to buy your tree? To help you find that perfect tree for your space, check out LIVE's guide to some of the local choose-and-cut Christmas tree farms. ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY Friendship Trees (6950 Old Solomons Island Road, Friendship)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2004
A van full of tree hunters crisscrossed Carroll County last week searching towns, farms and subdivisions for the county's first official holiday pine. They took notes and measurements, placing the tallest hunter next to each specimen to gauge tree stature. They finally settled on a 22-foot tall Douglas fir that, until recently, towered over a Hampstead back lot. But, because of rush-hour traffic and fading sunlight, the finely shaped evergreen almost missed the final cut. Its trip to the county office building in Westminster started earlier this month, when the county commissioners appealed for a tree donation.
FEATURES
By Tony Johnston | December 29, 1999
Editor's note: This retelling of the familiar fairy tale is set in an old-growth forest and features Bigfoot characters.Once upon a time, in the old-growth forest, a band of Bigfoots lived. An enormous snag towered above the other trees close to their camp. Inside its hollow halls of bark lived a dashing Bigfoot prince.He was tall and dark as a Douglas fir -- with feet like cedar stumps. He was oderiferous as his tree-home was coniferous. And so horrendously hairy that Bigfoot women near and far longed to marry him.Now, every year the Bigfoot prince gave a great fun-fest.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | December 12, 1998
WHEN hunting for a Christmas tree, you are, according to Roger Highfield, author of "The Physics of Christmas," supposed to look for a tree with a straight trunk that slips easily into the stand. You also want limbs angling upward at 45 degrees, a uniform conical shape tapering downward at 40 degrees and good needle retention.I disagree. Who wants such a cookie-cutter, perfect tree? Gimme a tree with character.According to Matthew Evans, the landscape architect of the Capitol, the tree to end all trees is the National Capitol Christmas Tree in Washington.
NEWS
By Joyce S. Brown | December 17, 1996
We consider hanging lightsand decorationson our ficus tree this year;no children will be here --they're over 30; they all work,and Christmas comesmidweek. The pricetag on one Douglas firastounds us annually,especially when, New Year's Day,we toss it out,long after it has droppedits load of needles on our floor.*It seems we just packedall the ornaments away and sangthe Wassail and God Rest Ye.But Joy to the World, we singin the car on the way to the lot wherea scout troop is selling fir trees.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | December 12, 1996
TO ME, NOTHING says Christmas like a 5-foot-tall chunk of green polyvinyl chloride decorated with taillight-red lights, a $1.98 garland from Rite Aid, and a couple of spray-cans of fake snow, the vague smell of heat-resistant thermoplastics wafting throughout the house.But my wife is one of these people who insists on having a real Christmas tree, whatever that means."What's more real than a cellulose acetate base and polycarbonate hooks for the branches?" I tell her.But she doesn't want to hear about it. You can talk to her 'til you're blue in the face, but she's firmly in the pocket of the anti-artificial tree lobby.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | December 12, 1998
WHEN hunting for a Christmas tree, you are, according to Roger Highfield, author of "The Physics of Christmas," supposed to look for a tree with a straight trunk that slips easily into the stand. You also want limbs angling upward at 45 degrees, a uniform conical shape tapering downward at 40 degrees and good needle retention.I disagree. Who wants such a cookie-cutter, perfect tree? Gimme a tree with character.According to Matthew Evans, the landscape architect of the Capitol, the tree to end all trees is the National Capitol Christmas Tree in Washington.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | December 12, 1996
TO ME, NOTHING says Christmas like a 5-foot-tall chunk of green polyvinyl chloride decorated with taillight-red lights, a $1.98 garland from Rite Aid, and a couple of spray-cans of fake snow, the vague smell of heat-resistant thermoplastics wafting throughout the house.But my wife is one of these people who insists on having a real Christmas tree, whatever that means."What's more real than a cellulose acetate base and polycarbonate hooks for the branches?" I tell her.But she doesn't want to hear about it. You can talk to her 'til you're blue in the face, but she's firmly in the pocket of the anti-artificial tree lobby.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1995
Everyone is looking for just the right Christmas tree.Pulling off her gloves, Shirley Crow slowly feels the needles.Diane Leicht sticks her head close to the boughs and inhales.Burke Walker walks several feet away from the tree and then turns around, trying to judge the long-distance effect.In the end, the choice of a Christmas tree is as much a mix of gut instinct and family tradition as it is a beauty contest."Everybody has their own opinion of the perfect tree," said Bill Sullivan, a worker at Valley View Farms in Cockeysville, where browsers began scouting out favorites the day after Thanksgiving.
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