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By Ben Neihart and Ben Neihart,Special to the Sun | June 23, 1996
"Polaroids from the Dead" by Douglas Coupland. ReganBooks. 199 pages. $18.Douglas Coupland's short stories, essays and occasional pieces, newly collected in "Polaroids from the Dead," are heartbreakingly intimate meditations on irresistible early- to mid-Nineties subjects - the youngest fans of the Grateful Dead; "Post Fame" celebrity culture; the Simpson murders; the suicide of Kurt Cobain; post-wall Berlin; twentysomething D.C. - mixed with persuasively detailed travel pieces and full-page movie stills, celebrity shots, pop- and natural landscapes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Justin Cronin and Justin Cronin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 16, 2005
Eleanor Rigby By Douglas Coupland. Bloomsbury. 256 page. $22.95. Canadian writer Douglas Coupland is best known for his 1991 novel, Generation X - a nugget of zeitgeisty cleverness so quotable that the title alone has spawned an entire alphabet of generational monikers. (In elementary school, we used to call these split-second generations by a different name: "grades.") Eleanor Rigby, Coupland's ninth and latest novel, won't be passing into the public lexicon anytime soon. Like its predecessors, it's a thoroughly au courant product, so much so that the title seems anachronistic - weren't the Beatles, like, very 1968?
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NEWS
By Alan Wilde and Alan Wilde,Special to The Sun | June 18, 1995
"Microserfs," by Douglas Coupland. 371 pages. New York: HarperCollins. $21 "Generation X," Douglas Coupland's first novel, offered media types a handy phrase to nail down the '90s and skewer its feckless youth."Microserfs," though clearly akin to its more self-conscious predecessor, differs in significant ways. Characters who badly needed a life in the earlier book have morphed into computer nerds who meditate obsessively about lacking, having or getting one.Mildly dystopian, the novel directs its irony at "a monolithic tech culture like Microsoft," and, less steadily, at its microserf workers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ben Neihart and Ben Neihart,Special to the Sun | July 6, 2003
Hey Nostradamus! by Douglas Coupland. Bloomsbury. 256 pages. $21.95 In a review of Bernhard Schlink's magnificent 1997 novel, The Reader, New York Times critic Richard Bernstein wrote that "Schlink tells this story with marvelous directness and simplicity, his writing stripped bare of any of the standard gimmicks of dramatization." Douglas Coupland, the author of the luminous novel Micro-serfs, and Genera-tion X, achieves some spectacular results using a stripped-bare narrative technique in his new novel, Hey Nostradamus!
FEATURES
By John Tanasychuk and John Tanasychuk,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 26, 1992
Douglas Coupland must be getting tired of being called the one true social chronicler for a generation.But in "Shampoo Planet," the author of "Generation X" does it again. He writes hilariously about a people who speak Telethon-ese."Tyler, you're fabulous. Truly fabulous. Stop being so fabulous."He writes about people who sate their "tabloid needs," about "cocktail enthusiasts" and about people who measure time not in minutes but in "five or six songs."These are the twentysomethings Mr. Coupland wrote soeloquently of in "Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Clare McHugh and By Clare McHugh,Special to the Sun | September 9, 2001
All Families are Psychotic, by Douglas Coupland. Bloomsbury. $24.95. 279 pages. What grabs you about this book is not the gyrations of the plot, although those are numerous and impressive. Nor is it the humor or subtly of the writing, even though both are ever-present. No, what you take away from the new novel by the author of Generation X and Microserfs is that Douglas Coupland is an old softie. Known in the literary establishment and beyond as a youthful chronicler of the anxieties and strivings of a new generation, Coupland, born in 1961, has here delved deep into the spirits of all five members of the Drummond family, two older parents and three thirtysomething children.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ben Neihart and Ben Neihart,Special to the Sun | July 6, 2003
Hey Nostradamus! by Douglas Coupland. Bloomsbury. 256 pages. $21.95 In a review of Bernhard Schlink's magnificent 1997 novel, The Reader, New York Times critic Richard Bernstein wrote that "Schlink tells this story with marvelous directness and simplicity, his writing stripped bare of any of the standard gimmicks of dramatization." Douglas Coupland, the author of the luminous novel Micro-serfs, and Genera-tion X, achieves some spectacular results using a stripped-bare narrative technique in his new novel, Hey Nostradamus!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Justin Cronin and Justin Cronin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 16, 2005
Eleanor Rigby By Douglas Coupland. Bloomsbury. 256 page. $22.95. Canadian writer Douglas Coupland is best known for his 1991 novel, Generation X - a nugget of zeitgeisty cleverness so quotable that the title alone has spawned an entire alphabet of generational monikers. (In elementary school, we used to call these split-second generations by a different name: "grades.") Eleanor Rigby, Coupland's ninth and latest novel, won't be passing into the public lexicon anytime soon. Like its predecessors, it's a thoroughly au courant product, so much so that the title seems anachronistic - weren't the Beatles, like, very 1968?
NEWS
By Sarah Vowell and Sarah Vowell,special to the sun | April 5, 1998
"Girlfriend in a Coma," by Douglas Coupland. Regan Books. 284 page.$24.It's worth remembering that the works of novelist Douglas Coupland, like "The X-Files," are produced in Canada. British Columbia, to be exact. And even though the supernatural conspiracy theory television show and Coupland's fictional expositions of the banalities of life in the 1990s are tied in various ways to the promise and products of Hollywood and Washington, there's still an evergreen scent floating around both bodies of work.
NEWS
By Dave Edelman | June 26, 1995
MICROSERFS. By Douglas Coupland. ReganBooks/HarperCollins. 384 pages. $21.DISREGARD THAT old phrase about how you can't judge a book by its cover when you read Douglas Coupland's "Microserfs." The 33-year-old Canadian's novels are so accurately conveyed by their packaging that sometimes I wonder whether he's just hacking out text under the whip of a nefarious cabal of publishing art directors. This would, of course, involve a cross-corporation conspiracy between St. Martin's Press, Simon & Schuster and publishing magnate Judith Regan (who has brought us, among others, "Beavis and Butthead's Ensucklopedia" and Robin Quivers' biography)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Clare McHugh and By Clare McHugh,Special to the Sun | September 9, 2001
All Families are Psychotic, by Douglas Coupland. Bloomsbury. $24.95. 279 pages. What grabs you about this book is not the gyrations of the plot, although those are numerous and impressive. Nor is it the humor or subtly of the writing, even though both are ever-present. No, what you take away from the new novel by the author of Generation X and Microserfs is that Douglas Coupland is an old softie. Known in the literary establishment and beyond as a youthful chronicler of the anxieties and strivings of a new generation, Coupland, born in 1961, has here delved deep into the spirits of all five members of the Drummond family, two older parents and three thirtysomething children.
FEATURES
By Lara M. Zeises and Lara M. Zeises,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 18, 1998
NEW YORK -- It's a cold, gray afternoon, and Douglas Coupland has just woken from a long nap in his overly heated suite at a posh Manhattan hotel.Dapper in a crisp white tuxedo shirt (collar and cuffs unbuttoned) and wide-wale black corduroy pants, Coupland sips Evian and surveys fellow diners in the hotel lobby's busy restaurant. After wiping the sleep from his slightly puffy eyes, he settles in for an animated chat about nuclear terror, the death of pub life in Scotland and his apocalyptic new novel, "Girlfriend in a Coma" (ReganBooks, $24)
NEWS
By Sarah Vowell and Sarah Vowell,special to the sun | April 5, 1998
"Girlfriend in a Coma," by Douglas Coupland. Regan Books. 284 page.$24.It's worth remembering that the works of novelist Douglas Coupland, like "The X-Files," are produced in Canada. British Columbia, to be exact. And even though the supernatural conspiracy theory television show and Coupland's fictional expositions of the banalities of life in the 1990s are tied in various ways to the promise and products of Hollywood and Washington, there's still an evergreen scent floating around both bodies of work.
NEWS
By Ben Neihart and Ben Neihart,Special to the Sun | June 23, 1996
"Polaroids from the Dead" by Douglas Coupland. ReganBooks. 199 pages. $18.Douglas Coupland's short stories, essays and occasional pieces, newly collected in "Polaroids from the Dead," are heartbreakingly intimate meditations on irresistible early- to mid-Nineties subjects - the youngest fans of the Grateful Dead; "Post Fame" celebrity culture; the Simpson murders; the suicide of Kurt Cobain; post-wall Berlin; twentysomething D.C. - mixed with persuasively detailed travel pieces and full-page movie stills, celebrity shots, pop- and natural landscapes.
NEWS
By Dave Edelman | June 26, 1995
MICROSERFS. By Douglas Coupland. ReganBooks/HarperCollins. 384 pages. $21.DISREGARD THAT old phrase about how you can't judge a book by its cover when you read Douglas Coupland's "Microserfs." The 33-year-old Canadian's novels are so accurately conveyed by their packaging that sometimes I wonder whether he's just hacking out text under the whip of a nefarious cabal of publishing art directors. This would, of course, involve a cross-corporation conspiracy between St. Martin's Press, Simon & Schuster and publishing magnate Judith Regan (who has brought us, among others, "Beavis and Butthead's Ensucklopedia" and Robin Quivers' biography)
NEWS
By Alan Wilde and Alan Wilde,Special to The Sun | June 18, 1995
"Microserfs," by Douglas Coupland. 371 pages. New York: HarperCollins. $21 "Generation X," Douglas Coupland's first novel, offered media types a handy phrase to nail down the '90s and skewer its feckless youth."Microserfs," though clearly akin to its more self-conscious predecessor, differs in significant ways. Characters who badly needed a life in the earlier book have morphed into computer nerds who meditate obsessively about lacking, having or getting one.Mildly dystopian, the novel directs its irony at "a monolithic tech culture like Microsoft," and, less steadily, at its microserf workers.
FEATURES
By Lara M. Zeises and Lara M. Zeises,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 18, 1998
NEW YORK -- It's a cold, gray afternoon, and Douglas Coupland has just woken from a long nap in his overly heated suite at a posh Manhattan hotel.Dapper in a crisp white tuxedo shirt (collar and cuffs unbuttoned) and wide-wale black corduroy pants, Coupland sips Evian and surveys fellow diners in the hotel lobby's busy restaurant. After wiping the sleep from his slightly puffy eyes, he settles in for an animated chat about nuclear terror, the death of pub life in Scotland and his apocalyptic new novel, "Girlfriend in a Coma" (ReganBooks, $24)
FEATURES
By Scott Timberg and Scott Timberg,Contributing Writer | March 2, 1994
Douglas Coupland -- the 32-year-old Canadian author who both cultivated and disavowed the role of spokesman for his generation -- says he's stopped smirking.Mr. Coupland burst on the scene in 1991 with "Generation X: Tales of an Accelerated Culture," dubbed a "Preppy Handbook" for smarmy twentysomethings.Kicking off a press tour in Washington, D.C., last week, Mr. Coupland explains that his new book, "Life After God," differs from his previous work in recognizing that smirky irony is not enough.
FEATURES
By Scott Timberg and Scott Timberg,Contributing Writer | March 2, 1994
Douglas Coupland -- the 32-year-old Canadian author who both cultivated and disavowed the role of spokesman for his generation -- says he's stopped smirking.Mr. Coupland burst on the scene in 1991 with "Generation X: Tales of an Accelerated Culture," dubbed a "Preppy Handbook" for smarmy twentysomethings.Kicking off a press tour in Washington, D.C., last week, Mr. Coupland explains that his new book, "Life After God," differs from his previous work in recognizing that smirky irony is not enough.
FEATURES
By John Tanasychuk and John Tanasychuk,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 26, 1992
Douglas Coupland must be getting tired of being called the one true social chronicler for a generation.But in "Shampoo Planet," the author of "Generation X" does it again. He writes hilariously about a people who speak Telethon-ese."Tyler, you're fabulous. Truly fabulous. Stop being so fabulous."He writes about people who sate their "tabloid needs," about "cocktail enthusiasts" and about people who measure time not in minutes but in "five or six songs."These are the twentysomethings Mr. Coupland wrote soeloquently of in "Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture."
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