Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDough
IN THE NEWS

Dough

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
EXPLORE
December 22, 2011
Editor: Thank you Mr. Craig, not only for providing the men and women of Harford County Government a bonus, but for standing out as a LEADER. Once again, you have shown what a true Leader does; make a decision, stand behind the decision, see it through and move on. Unfortunately, the teacher's union, like our current state and federal government, chose to make a poor decision, try to explain their decision, give excuses for their decision and then when all else fails; blame it on someone else.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
At The Arthouse in Hampden, Chef Jordi Miller uses simple ingredients to create pizzas and pastas that are fresh, creative and delicious. Here, she makes the most of Maryland crabmeat and asparagus, combining them with fresh pappardelle and a mustardy cream sauce. Instead of making your own pasta, you can substitute your favorite store-bought brand. But for adventurous home cooks, the paper-thin pappardelle will require a pasta roller. “Cheap ones start at around $20 and will suit your purposes,” says Miller.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 13, 2011
Constellation Energy Group CEO Mayo A. Shattuck III was paid $15.7 million last year. Wouldn't it be interesting to know just what decisions he made that were worth that kind of money? George B. Wroe, Glyndon
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Thomas, For The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
This recipe has the savory flavors of bratwurst, onions, garlic and parsley, and is mixed with cheese and then wrapped stromboli-style in a pizza dough. All of the preparation for this recipe is performed at home, making it a great light tailgate offering that can be ready to eat in under 10 minutes at the parking lot. Bratwurst roll 1 pack of bratwurst sausage (5 or 6 links) 14 ounce pre-made pizza dough (from the pop-can) 1/2 of a large sweet onion (diced) 5 cloves of garlic (peeled and diced)
FEATURES
By Faye Levy and Faye Levy,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 18, 1994
Delectable desserts topped with sweet pastry crumbs called streusel are popular in much of Eastern Europe. The crumbs add an irresistible touch to all sorts of pastries and cakes, from sweet Russian yeast breads to German cheesecakes to Czech apple pies to Polish plum cakes.The classic streusel preparation is a mixture of butter, sugar and flour rubbed together by hand to form crumbs. They traditionally are used to add pizazz to plain yeast cakes. Old-fashioned recipes call for making a yeast dough, letting it rise, spreading it in a cake pan, preparing a crumb mixture and sprinkling it over the dough.
NEWS
October 31, 1999
To shape drop cookies, use one spoon to scoop dough and a second of the same size to push dough onto baking sheet. Use both spoons to mound and smooth dough. -- Cole's Cooking A to Z
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN | July 5, 2006
A cheap plastic scraper can be an extension of your hand when making bread. The rounded end helps mix, turn out dough in one piece and lift stray bits from the counter. The straight edge can be used for cutting and dividing dough. From "Dough: Simple Contemporary Bread," by Richard Bertinet taquitos.net This is the place for snackaholics to get their fix. The site, started by a couple of potato-chip lovers, boasts reviews of 3,000 kinds of chips, chocolate-covered peanuts, cheese puffs and other munchies.
FEATURES
By Faye Levy and Faye Levy,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 28, 1993
A favorite springtime dessert in France is a light strawberry savarin. One of the most elegant of classic cakes, this ring-shaped dessert is created from an easy-to-make batter.The cake gains its lightness from yeast, but is different from other yeast-leavened cakes; savarins are moist and delicate and not chewy. Thus they are served for dessert rather than as breakfast pastries or coffeecakes.In addition, the dough requires no kneading -- the batter is beaten. At a cooking school in Paris, I was taught to make the batter by beating it with a wooden spoon, but I prefer to make it with a mixer or a food processor.
FEATURES
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | August 16, 1998
An exquisite fresh-fruit tart reflects culinary craftsmanship as much as artistry. The challenge lies in crafting a pastry shell that can hold several pints of fresh fruit without turning soggy.Cole Publishing GroupRaspberry-Almond TartServes 6 to 8SWEET TART PASTRY:1/8 teaspoon salt1/4 cup sugar2 extra-large egg yolks1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter1 1/4 cups flourALMOND FILLING:7 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened1 1/4 cups sifted confectioners' sugar1 1/4 cups finely ground blanched almonds1 small egg, lightly beaten1 cup red currant or red raspberry jelly1 tablespoon raspberry-flavored liqueur or kirsch2 to 3 cups fresh raspberries, washed and well-drainedTo prepare tart shell, place all ingredients except flour in food processor; process with 4 one-second pulses.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | September 30, 2001
This project started off as a way to say "thanks for showing up" to the eggplant. In these, the waning days of garden productivity, I am grateful for any plant that continues to bear fruit. As often happens with my cooking projects, this one soon took a turn in a different direction. I found a recipe that mixed eggplant, basil and four cheeses. The challenge came with handling the calzone, the trouser-leg-shaped dough that wrapped around the eggplant and cheeses. The trick was transferring the dough, stuffed with eggplant and cheese, onto the pizza stone in a piping hot, 500-degree oven.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
Orrell's Maryland beaten biscuits won't be making their annual appearance on Thanksgiving tables this year. The factory that makes them has been closed since the death of its owner, Herman Miller "Dick" Orrell III. Orrell, whose mother, Ruth, started the factory, died Sept. 5 at age 83. Orrell's operated out of a 100-year-old house in Wye on Maryland's Eastern Shore. Beaten biscuits are so named because in days when yeast and other leavening agents were scarce, bakers would beat the dough with the handle of an ax or hammer to make the dough rise.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun and By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| June 6, 2013
Riccardo Bosio knows that great food - and great eating habits - start with fresh, whole ingredients. Bosio, the owner of the upscale Italian restaurant Sotto Sopra in Mount Vernon, can often be found in his home kitchen with his wife, Monika, and their daughters Amelia, 3, and Victoria, who will be 2 months old in June. "We cook at home and at the restaurant," says Bosio. "Amelia is always with us cooking. We try to teach her how things are made by hand. " Young Amelia loves healthy ingredients, like fresh pasta, Parmesan cheese and even spinach.
EXPLORE
October 26, 2012
"This isn't rocket science," assured John Azzolini, as he methodically attacked a lifeless mound of dough with his trusty rolling pin: four words that were music to my ears. John's a brilliant electrical engineer at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, and I was a guest at the house he shares with Mary Ann, his bride of 41 years. Both are native New Yorkers and they share an Italian ancestry: Her maiden name was Vinticinquo. What better locale than the kitchen of their lovely North Laurel home for me to receive the secret ingredients that make a genuine New York pizza?
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | September 20, 2012
When it comes to weeknight dinners, some of us are not big fans of planning ahead. Oh, we might take something out of the freezer in the morning, then figure out what to do with it later in the day. Not for us all the a.m. prep work, so the crock pot can do its thing all day. About 4 p.m., maybe even 5 p.m., is certainly soon enough to figure out what to do with the chicken or ground beef that's been defrosting all day. Which is why, when...
EXPLORE
December 22, 2011
Editor: Thank you Mr. Craig, not only for providing the men and women of Harford County Government a bonus, but for standing out as a LEADER. Once again, you have shown what a true Leader does; make a decision, stand behind the decision, see it through and move on. Unfortunately, the teacher's union, like our current state and federal government, chose to make a poor decision, try to explain their decision, give excuses for their decision and then when all else fails; blame it on someone else.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | December 14, 2011
Let's see a show of hands: does anyone really think Ray Rice won't be a Raven next year? Anyone really think the Ravens won't sign him to a long-term deal in the off-season? Anyone really think Ozzie Newsome will show Rice the door and say "Hey, little man, sorry it didn't work out" when his current contract expires? Please. The Ravens are going to pay the man. You know it. I know it. The American people know it. Even if the team slaps the franchise tag on their star running back, he'll still have a Brinks truck backing up to his house with sacks of cash for years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Thomas, For The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
This recipe has the savory flavors of bratwurst, onions, garlic and parsley, and is mixed with cheese and then wrapped stromboli-style in a pizza dough. All of the preparation for this recipe is performed at home, making it a great light tailgate offering that can be ready to eat in under 10 minutes at the parking lot. Bratwurst roll 1 pack of bratwurst sausage (5 or 6 links) 14 ounce pre-made pizza dough (from the pop-can) 1/2 of a large sweet onion (diced) 5 cloves of garlic (peeled and diced)
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2011
Janet Janata from Norfolk, Va., was looking for a recipe for what her husband called a "Marc Cake. " She described it as a rolled yeast cake with a sweet poppy seed filling. DC Kiss from Ellicott City thought that the cake Janata and her husband were looking for sounded like the traditional Hungarian pastry called Makos (poppy seed) Kalacs. The recipe she sent in ran in the Sunday Sun Magazine in May 1966. This light and airy, slightly sweet yeast bread is similar in texture to challah bread.
EXPLORE
By Staff Reports | August 14, 2011
WESTMINSTER - Carroll County law enforcement officials will team up with Dunkin' Donuts this week - but it has nothing to do with a doughnut delivery for officers. Local police will join with law enforcement colleagues across Maryland for the second annual Cops on Rooftops event in Westminster, raising money for Maryland Special Olympics. Maryland State Police Lt. Jim DeWees and Westminster Police Chief Jeff Spaulding will sit on the rooftop of the Westminster Dunkin' Donuts, at 576 Jermor Lane (140 Shopping Center)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.