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August 30, 1998
Choose the most tender young vegetables for crudites. Pare only if necessary, then cut into sticks of chunks.-- The New Doubleday CookbookPub Date: 8/30/98@
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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | March 18, 2013
Dan Brown fans can get a look at the opening of his upcoming book, "Inferno," along with a free ebook of his breakthrough best-seller, "The Da Vinci Code," publisher Doubleday announced today. The digital two-fer, which marks the 10th anniversary of DVC, will be available until March 24 at e-book retailers, the company said. Fans will also get the prologue and first chapter of "Inferno," which is scheduled for a May 14 release. It's a smart move for Doubleday. It doesn't cost much to offer the DVC download -- everyone in the whole world has already read the thriller.
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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | March 18, 2013
Dan Brown fans can get a look at the opening of his upcoming book, "Inferno," along with a free ebook of his breakthrough best-seller, "The Da Vinci Code," publisher Doubleday announced today. The digital two-fer, which marks the 10th anniversary of DVC, will be available until March 24 at e-book retailers, the company said. Fans will also get the prologue and first chapter of "Inferno," which is scheduled for a May 14 release. It's a smart move for Doubleday. It doesn't cost much to offer the DVC download -- everyone in the whole world has already read the thriller.
ENTERTAINMENT
By The National Book Foundation; amazon.com | October 19, 2008
More than 200 publishers submitted 1,258 books for the 2008 National Book Awards. Here are the finalists, which were announced Wednesday. The winners will be announced Nov. 19. FICTION The Lazarus Project by Aleksandar Hemon Riverhead / 304 pages / $24.95 A young writer in Chicago goes in search of the answers to why a police chief killed an Eastern European immigrant a century ago. Telex from Cuba by Rachel Kushner Scribner / 336 pages / $25...
NEWS
November 28, 2004
Arthur Hailey, 84, the best-selling author whose exhaustively researched suspense novels such as Airport and Hotel also became screen hits, died in his sleep Wednesday at his home in the Bahamas of an apparent stroke. He produced a string of best-sellers, achieving international fame in 1968 with his novel Airport (Doubleday), a page-turner about an airport manager's ordeal after a bomber boards a plane flown by the manager's womanizing brother-in-law. It inspired a 1970 movie starring Burt Lancaster and Dean Martin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 7, 2004
Fans of Dan Brown, author of The Da Vinci Code, have been obsessed with his next book since he revealed earlier this year that The Da Vinci Code cover contains clues about his next novel. What it does not contain is the title, which will be The Solomon Key, a nugget Brown's publisher, Stephen Rubin, let slip recently during a lunch with reporters who cover the book industry. The book, whose release date has not been announced, is likely to be the most anticipated novel to hit stores in years, not least because The Da Vinci Code, published in March 2003, is still selling tens of thousands of copies a week.
FEATURES
By Paul D. Colford and Paul D. Colford,Newsday | April 10, 1994
It doesn't get much better for an author and publisher when Newsweek bases a cover story on their new book and Time gives it generous attention in the same week. But considering Raymond E. Brown's weighty subject matter and hefty list price, will take more than great publicity to spur impressive sales. It will take time, and faith, both of which Doubleday professes to have in ample supply.Father Brown's opus is "The Death of the Messiah" -- a two-volume, 1,608-page, scholarly study of Jesus Christ's Passion as it is related in the four New Testament gospels.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 13, 1998
WHILE THE political voyeurs in Washington's congressional un-zip code strive to make Bill Clinton's sex life sound like a threat to the national well-being, the woman who blabbed about his philanderings, Linda Tripp, attempts to slip through history's side door while nobody's paying attention.In Ellicott City, a grand jury heard testimony last week that could help nail Tripp on charges of illegally taping her telephone conversations with Monica Lewinsky. Tripp's lawyers publicly deplore these unseemly proceedings.
NEWS
February 10, 2008
Carla D. Hayden has been executive director of Baltimore's Enoch Pratt Free Library since 1993. She has been credited with leading an effort to rebuild the city's library system since then. She served as president of the American Library Association for a one-year term beginning in 2003 and won praise for taking a tough stance against the Patriot Act of 2001, a federal law that forced public libraries to comply with FBI requests about patrons' records. "Although I have read and loved many books during my life, there are a few that still stand out for a variety of reasons," she says: "Bright April" / by Marguerite De Angeli / Doubleday / 88 pages / $15.99 As a young child of color I did not realize that this lovely children's book by a noted illustrator was actually groundbreaking in its sympathetic portrayal of a Black family; I only saw and loved the beautiful pictures of a Brownie with pigtails who (I thought)
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | May 14, 1995
I read the No. 1 best-selling novel in the country the other day. There was not a single surprise, and precious little delight. Then I listened to it. Eureka! I found considerable of both. Therein lay a revelation.The book was "The Rainmaker," by John Grisham (New York: Doubleday. 434 pages. $25.95). Probably the less that is said about it the better, but once again, that won't stand in my way.The second experience was listening to four audio cassettes, same title, running time 360 minutes, "abridgment approved by the author," also $25.95, produced and copyrighted by Bantam Doubleday Dell Audio Publishing, a division of the company that published the book.
NEWS
By Tim Rutten and Tim Rutten,Los Angeles Times | February 17, 2008
The Appeal By John Grisham Doubleday / 368 pages / $27.95 The Appeal is as angry, dark and urgent a piece of social realism as you're likely to find on the best-seller lists any time soon. Further, in this presidential election year, it's a far more blunt, accurate and plain-spoken indictment of our contemporary political system's real failings than you're likely to find anywhere on the nonfiction lists. Grisham has set himself an interesting task in The Appeal - to simultaneously explore the malevolent influence of moneyed special interests on our electoral system and to rehabilitate the social standing of trial lawyers.
NEWS
February 10, 2008
Carla D. Hayden has been executive director of Baltimore's Enoch Pratt Free Library since 1993. She has been credited with leading an effort to rebuild the city's library system since then. She served as president of the American Library Association for a one-year term beginning in 2003 and won praise for taking a tough stance against the Patriot Act of 2001, a federal law that forced public libraries to comply with FBI requests about patrons' records. "Although I have read and loved many books during my life, there are a few that still stand out for a variety of reasons," she says: "Bright April" / by Marguerite De Angeli / Doubleday / 88 pages / $15.99 As a young child of color I did not realize that this lovely children's book by a noted illustrator was actually groundbreaking in its sympathetic portrayal of a Black family; I only saw and loved the beautiful pictures of a Brownie with pigtails who (I thought)
NEWS
By Wendy Smith and Wendy Smith,Los Angeles Times | January 28, 2007
Overture Yael Goldstein Doubleday / 294 pages / $24.95 Yael Goldstein's intelligent, elegantly written first novel explores the conflicts of a gifted woman whose accomplishments don't meet the exalted standards she's set for herself. Goldstein lets classical violinist Natasha Darsky narrate her own story - a smart strategy, since readers might otherwise be baffled by the bad decisions Natasha makes and irritated by her disdain for her success as a virtuoso performer. Instead, as Natasha looks back over her life, we have the satisfaction of understanding her choices from her point of view while at the same time seeing more clearly than she can the psychological forces that have shaped her. The opening scene deftly establishes the central mystery that compels us to follow Natasha through four decades of memories.
NEWS
By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN REPORTER | July 30, 2006
The Big Bam Leigh Montville Doubleday / 366 pages / $26.95 From the day in 1914 that Babe Ruth walked out of St. Mary's Industrial School for Boys in Baltimore until the evening in 1948 that he drew his final breath, The Bambino careened through life at an unimaginable pace. No thrill was too ordinary. No night out was too long. No feast of food or drink was too much. Whether it was baseball, fast cars or faster women, Ruth savored the world spinning around his axis, swallowed it whole and reveled in its every moment.
NEWS
By STEVE WEINBERG and STEVE WEINBERG,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 2006
Politics Lost: How American Democracy Was Trivialized by People Who Think You're Stupid Joe Klein Doubleday / 272 pages / $23.95 From the epigraph to the final page of Politics Lost, it is obvious that author Joe Klein is a lover of the elections business. The carefully chosen epigraph comes from Edward I. Koch, spoken during a campaign for mayor of New York City: "If you agree with me on nine out of twelve issues, vote for me. If you agree with me on twelve out of twelve issues, see a psychiatrist."
NEWS
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | October 9, 2005
Don't Get Too Comfortable David Rakoff Doubleday / 240 pages David Rakoff's new book is both a celebration and an indictment of the pampered lifestyle enjoyed by many Americans - or at least those with disposable income and high credit limits. He skewers the absurdity of our consumer fetishes with high thread counts and exotic olive oil and ice cubes frozen in the Scottish Highlands and overnighted to our doorsteps, while admitting that he is part of the very culture he lampoons. He argues that the quest for perfection in all we consume has become narcissistic, and, even worse, that by indulging it we also confuse having nice things with moral virtue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By The National Book Foundation; amazon.com | October 19, 2008
More than 200 publishers submitted 1,258 books for the 2008 National Book Awards. Here are the finalists, which were announced Wednesday. The winners will be announced Nov. 19. FICTION The Lazarus Project by Aleksandar Hemon Riverhead / 304 pages / $24.95 A young writer in Chicago goes in search of the answers to why a police chief killed an Eastern European immigrant a century ago. Telex from Cuba by Rachel Kushner Scribner / 336 pages / $25...
NEWS
By Tim Rutten and Tim Rutten,Los Angeles Times | February 17, 2008
The Appeal By John Grisham Doubleday / 368 pages / $27.95 The Appeal is as angry, dark and urgent a piece of social realism as you're likely to find on the best-seller lists any time soon. Further, in this presidential election year, it's a far more blunt, accurate and plain-spoken indictment of our contemporary political system's real failings than you're likely to find anywhere on the nonfiction lists. Grisham has set himself an interesting task in The Appeal - to simultaneously explore the malevolent influence of moneyed special interests on our electoral system and to rehabilitate the social standing of trial lawyers.
NEWS
November 28, 2004
Arthur Hailey, 84, the best-selling author whose exhaustively researched suspense novels such as Airport and Hotel also became screen hits, died in his sleep Wednesday at his home in the Bahamas of an apparent stroke. He produced a string of best-sellers, achieving international fame in 1968 with his novel Airport (Doubleday), a page-turner about an airport manager's ordeal after a bomber boards a plane flown by the manager's womanizing brother-in-law. It inspired a 1970 movie starring Burt Lancaster and Dean Martin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 7, 2004
Fans of Dan Brown, author of The Da Vinci Code, have been obsessed with his next book since he revealed earlier this year that The Da Vinci Code cover contains clues about his next novel. What it does not contain is the title, which will be The Solomon Key, a nugget Brown's publisher, Stephen Rubin, let slip recently during a lunch with reporters who cover the book industry. The book, whose release date has not been announced, is likely to be the most anticipated novel to hit stores in years, not least because The Da Vinci Code, published in March 2003, is still selling tens of thousands of copies a week.
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