Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDouble Whammy
IN THE NEWS

Double Whammy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | February 2, 1992
The governor giveth and he taketh away. The catch is, the Carroll commissioners don't want any part of the giveth side of the equation.Under the fiscal 1993 state budget proposed by Gov. William Donald Schaefer Thursday, scheduled increases in aid to Carroll would be reduced by $6.4 million for the year beginning July 1. The current county budget is about $112 million.The catch is that the county could make up for all of that lost revenue if the General Assembly enacts legislation enabling counties to raise local income tax rates and the commissioners use that authority.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 27, 2014
In this current legislative season, the Maryland General Assembly had an opportunity to support proposed legislation which would establish a Futures Commission to help our state develop a strategy for dealing with potential military cuts. The Future Commission was based on best practices from the U.S. Department of Defense and as the state with the fourth greatest dependency on military spending, there are concerns that defense draw downs could potentially create difficult economic shocks for many workers and communities in Maryland.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 19, 1997
MARYLAND FARMERS are facing a double whammy during this, the worst drought in at least three decades. Their crops of corn and soybeans have withered in the enduring heat and aridity, while nationwide production is expected to be at or near record levels.The result is lower prices, and less product to sell, for farmers in most of this state. Corn yield in Maryland is projected to fall by 40 percent, soybean output by 20 percent. Net farm income for Maryland will fall 30 percent, predicts state Agriculture Secretary Lewis R. Riley, and will "be felt in Main Street of rural towns all across the state," as farmers spend less.
NEWS
By Nancy Jacobs | July 1, 2013
Maryland drivers' wallets will soon be running on empty, thanks to Gov. Martin O'Malley and the Democratic majority in the General Assembly. Starting today, Martin O'Malley's sticky fingers are plunging deep in our pockets to pull out an additional $2 in toll fees for the Bay Bridge, the Harry W. Nice Bridge, the JFK Highway and Thomas J. Hatem Memorial Bridge. The government will grab an additional dollar for the Harbor and Ft. McHenry tunnels and the Francis Scott Key Bridge. Next year when the express toll lanes open on Interstate 95, we'll have even more toll hikes with the variable toll rates lanes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 2006
SAN FRANCISCO --Azhar Usman, a burly American-born Muslim with a heavy black beard, says he elicits an almost universal reaction when he boards an airplane at any U.S. airport: Conversations stop in mid-sentence, and the look in the eyes of his fellow passengers says, "We're all going to die!" For Ahmed Ahmed, a comedian, it is even worse. His double-barreled name matches an occasional alias used by a henchman of Osama bin Laden. "It's a bad time to be named Ahmed right now," he riffs in his stand-up routine before describing being hauled through the Las Vegas airport in handcuffs.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2000
With good jobs available for the asking, and confidence among shoppers still high, Maryland consumers continued their free-spending ways during this year's first quarter as the U.S. economy continued its record run. Still, there were a few signs of slowing in this year's first three months. In the housing market - important because of the ripple impact it has on the economy - the double whammy of rising interest rates and few homes for sale in some of Maryland's most desirable neighborhoods led to a statewide decline in home settlements for the second straight quarter.
NEWS
March 27, 2014
In this current legislative season, the Maryland General Assembly had an opportunity to support proposed legislation which would establish a Futures Commission to help our state develop a strategy for dealing with potential military cuts. The Future Commission was based on best practices from the U.S. Department of Defense and as the state with the fourth greatest dependency on military spending, there are concerns that defense draw downs could potentially create difficult economic shocks for many workers and communities in Maryland.
NEWS
September 30, 2002
ENOUGH POSITIVE economic signs abound these days that -- in theory, at least -- there ought to be more smiling faces around. America's economy is still growing at a decent rate. Productivity gains remain healthy. Inflation is hard to find. The housing market could be cooling down but is still strong from a boom that has buttressed homeowners' net worth. Mortgage rates hit a 31-year low last week, continuing to provide sizable windfalls from refinancing -- projected at $200 billion this year.
NEWS
March 14, 2011
The earthquake and tsunami that hit northern Japan on Friday were natural disasters of epic proportions that left the country to cope with not one but two huge challenges. Many thousands perished under the towering waters that swept ashore after the first temblor and wiped away dozens of coastal villages. In their wake, millions more were stranded without electricity, drinking water, food or shelter, and communications with the rest of the country have been virtually cut off. Compounding the humanitarian crisis is the specter of an environmental catastrophe stemming from the potential meltdown of one or more of three nuclear reactors at an electrical generating plant.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | November 9, 2005
The Ravens' recent losses to the Pittsburgh Steelers and Cincinnati Bengals not only consigned them to a disappointing season, but also emphasized the biggest reason they have fallen behind their AFC North rivals - in the big-picture developmental sense, not just in the standings. When the Steelers needed a late score on Halloween night, Ben Roethlisberger - their star second-year quarterback - drove them to a game-winning field goal. When the Bengals needed to hold on to the ball to snuff out a Ravens rally last Sunday, Carson Palmer - their star third-year quarterback - led them on a 12-play, 91-yard touchdown drive that wrapped up a victory.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
Come Monday, driving around Maryland will cost more - both at the gas pump and the toll plaza. Marylanders will see a 3.5 cent rise in the state's gas tax - the first such increase in two decades - as well as toll rates that jump as much as 50 percent. The changes that take effect July 1 concern some residents. Trucking company president Tom Huseman is measuring the impact of both increases in thousands of dollars. Joseph L. DiBlasio of Essex is adjusting his commute to avoid the higher toll at the Fort McHenry Tunnel.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | December 2, 2012
Historians note the American alliance with King Louis XVI sustained the American cause during the darkest days of the Revolution. The history is impossible to escape. But for the deal struck in February 1778, General Washington and his Continental Army would likely not have survived. Nevertheless, and despite a successful alliance in two world wars, taking the French to task has become a popular American sport. French resistance to U.S. foreign policy moves is one reason.
NEWS
March 14, 2011
The earthquake and tsunami that hit northern Japan on Friday were natural disasters of epic proportions that left the country to cope with not one but two huge challenges. Many thousands perished under the towering waters that swept ashore after the first temblor and wiped away dozens of coastal villages. In their wake, millions more were stranded without electricity, drinking water, food or shelter, and communications with the rest of the country have been virtually cut off. Compounding the humanitarian crisis is the specter of an environmental catastrophe stemming from the potential meltdown of one or more of three nuclear reactors at an electrical generating plant.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN REPORTER | April 3, 2008
Smoking causes lung cancer. That much is known. But three new studies published today suggest that genes might play a role in why some longtime smokers get the deadly disease and others do not. The scientists say these common genetic variations might also make smokers more likely to become addicted to tobacco and to smoke more cigarettes. The findings, which several experts said mark the first time that a genetic variation has been linked to lung cancer, could lead to a greater understanding of how smoking and genes interact to cause the disease.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 2006
SAN FRANCISCO --Azhar Usman, a burly American-born Muslim with a heavy black beard, says he elicits an almost universal reaction when he boards an airplane at any U.S. airport: Conversations stop in mid-sentence, and the look in the eyes of his fellow passengers says, "We're all going to die!" For Ahmed Ahmed, a comedian, it is even worse. His double-barreled name matches an occasional alias used by a henchman of Osama bin Laden. "It's a bad time to be named Ahmed right now," he riffs in his stand-up routine before describing being hauled through the Las Vegas airport in handcuffs.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | November 9, 2005
The Ravens' recent losses to the Pittsburgh Steelers and Cincinnati Bengals not only consigned them to a disappointing season, but also emphasized the biggest reason they have fallen behind their AFC North rivals - in the big-picture developmental sense, not just in the standings. When the Steelers needed a late score on Halloween night, Ben Roethlisberger - their star second-year quarterback - drove them to a game-winning field goal. When the Bengals needed to hold on to the ball to snuff out a Ravens rally last Sunday, Carson Palmer - their star third-year quarterback - led them on a 12-play, 91-yard touchdown drive that wrapped up a victory.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | December 2, 2012
Historians note the American alliance with King Louis XVI sustained the American cause during the darkest days of the Revolution. The history is impossible to escape. But for the deal struck in February 1778, General Washington and his Continental Army would likely not have survived. Nevertheless, and despite a successful alliance in two world wars, taking the French to task has become a popular American sport. French resistance to U.S. foreign policy moves is one reason.
NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 19, 2002
BROOKLYN PARK Middle School pupils Krystina Engel, Danielle Evans, Jessica Horton, Richard Rebstock, John Cosner, Emily Fador, Scott Mauller, Victoria Vykol, Crystal Marion and Patricia Wood were inducted last week into the school's Society for Social Studies Scholars. The society is a program designed by Brooklyn Park teacher Jan Meaney to reward and encourage pupils in the study of history, geography and other social studies. To achieve this honor, the pupils were required to successfully complete a study of ancient Egypt and present their findings in a PowerPoint slide show with animation and sound effects.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Warren, David Himmelstein and Steffie Woolhandler | May 12, 2005
HEALTH INSURANCE is a bit like a hospital gown. From the front it appears to shield the essentials. Closer inspection, however, reveals a lot uncovered behind - and only a tenuous thread prevents full exposure. Most Americans think they're covered, except the 45 million who are uninsured ("going bare," in insurance industry parlance). But few of us are really shielded from the financial ravages of illness. Each year, 1 million people are bankrupted by illness or medical bills, according to the Harvard Consumer Bankruptcy Project, the first in-depth study of medical bankruptcy.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2003
East Columbia homes have increased in value at an average of 33.4 percent, bringing in millions of dollars to the Columbia Association and causing residents to complain about skyrocketing assessment bills. The association's homeowners fees - which are tied to a home's assessed value - have gotten so high since the state's recent property reassessment that the Columbia Association's board of directors and staff are investigating alternatives to deal with the increase. The board is scheduled to report on its progress at tonight's board meeting.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.