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Double Life

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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2010
Joseph Bartenfelder spends what he calls his "sanity" time lifting boxes, riding tractors, driving truckloads of produce through the night to market. For decades, he's pursued the double life of politician and farmer, an identity his supporters say sets him apart in an age of white-collar public officials. Joe is Joe, they say — what you see is what you get. What you see is a tall, broad-shouldered man with a genial manner who seems to move easily between dark business suits and dusty work pants, who says he means to sustain small bits of this long-running juggling act even if he wins the job of Baltimore County executive, running the multibillion-dollar operation that is the county government.
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NEWS
By Linda Burkins and For The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
In roller derby, a name says it all. The Hazard County Hellions, Harford County's only roller derby team, chose a name that seems wild and mischievous, a stark contrast to the responsible citizens who form the team. In this sport, theatrics are just as much a part of a match as athletics, and its players, no matter how shy or timid they seem by day, take on sassy, aggressive alter egos when they lace up their skates. Formed in 2013, the co-ed team is part of MADE (Modern Athletic Derby Endeavor)
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2012
Christian Gettis says he doesn't know why men rushed into his Northeast Baltimore home in late 2010, tied up his wife and shot him multiple times. Federal prosecutors said Friday they suspect it probably had something to do with his heroin ring. According to his attorney, Gettis, 39, was mentoring young people and working at the West Baltimore clothing store Samos while shielding those close to him — including his wife and a son in college — from the knowledge that he was dealing drugs.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2012
Isaac Truss, his body shaking so much that the clinking of his shackles could be heard in the back of the courtroom, seemed unsure during his sentencing on two murders Wednesday whether he wanted to show remorse or try the case.  Having already pleaded guilty to killing two men in downtown Baltimore over the course of less than two days, Truss was now appearing before Circuit Court Judge Althea Handy for sentencing. But he started off the hearing by seeking to revoke his plea.  "I wanted to go to trial," he told Handy.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 12, 1992
"The Double Life of Veronique," opening today at the Charles for a week's stay, is a seductive, glorious and irresistible piece of movie-making, not bad considering it's pure claptrap.It's built around one of those mystic cliches so beloved of the pulp imagination: the tradition of "doppelganger," of doubles, and the fascinating but meaningless suspicion that somewhere in the world there happens to be another boy or girl just like you!But when the movies treat this theme, the doubled subject is always a beautiful woman.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 12, 1992
"The Double Life of Veronique," opening today at the Charles for a week's stay, is a seductive, glorious and irresistible piece of movie-making, not bad considering it's pure claptrap.It's built around one of those mystic cliches so beloved of the pulp imagination: the tradition of "doppelganger," of doubles, and the fascinating but meaningless suspicion that somewhere in the world there happens to be another boy or girl s just like you!But when the movies treat this theme, the doubled subject is always a beautiful woman.
FEATURES
By Neal Lipschutz | January 15, 1995
Earl Shorris has led an unusual double life -- writer and salesman. A writer of books and contributing editor to Harper's magazine, he also spent a career as an advertising man and consultant to large corporations. In this pessimistic look at a world where he thinks selling in all its forms has run amok, Mr. Shorris clearly has turned against his business side.The author argues that the act of selling, morally neutral and crucial to the functioning of economic and cultural systems throughout history, has wildly overstepped its bounds to become the dominant force in America's business and social life.
NEWS
By Linda Burkins and For The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
In roller derby, a name says it all. The Hazard County Hellions, Harford County's only roller derby team, chose a name that seems wild and mischievous, a stark contrast to the responsible citizens who form the team. In this sport, theatrics are just as much a part of a match as athletics, and its players, no matter how shy or timid they seem by day, take on sassy, aggressive alter egos when they lace up their skates. Formed in 2013, the co-ed team is part of MADE (Modern Athletic Derby Endeavor)
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 5, 2006
PALM BEACH, Fla. -- Mark Foley, until last week a fixture on this town's lofty social circuit, once recounted a party at Mar-a-Lago, Donald J. Trump's fabled estate. "Miss Germany was my date," he told a writer at Washingtonian magazine for an article called "How to Date a Congressman." It was one of the many hints that Foley dropped to mask the realities of his strictly compartmentalized life. Over 12 years in Congress, he became adept at projecting a magnetic public persona - helped by loyal aides and a sister he breezily called his surrogate wife - while conducting a private life fraught with more secrets than anyone imagined.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Melody Simmons contributed to this article | May 22, 1994
In the summer of 1992, a blond woman in tailored business clothes began to appear on the street corners of West Baltimore, joining the lines of junkies waiting to buy heroin.In the all-black neighborhood of Franklin Square, the newcomer's presence was striking."My daughter used to have to walk right past where they distribute the drugs each day on her way home from work," recalled Joyce Smith, the Franklin Square Association president."I remember her coming home one day that summer and saying, 'Mama, you wouldn't believe it. There's a white woman with a real nice haircut, nice clothes, too, up there in the line.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2012
Christian Gettis says he doesn't know why men rushed into his Northeast Baltimore home in late 2010, tied up his wife and shot him multiple times. Federal prosecutors said Friday they suspect it probably had something to do with his heroin ring. According to his attorney, Gettis, 39, was mentoring young people and working at the West Baltimore clothing store Samos while shielding those close to him — including his wife and a son in college — from the knowledge that he was dealing drugs.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2010
Joseph Bartenfelder spends what he calls his "sanity" time lifting boxes, riding tractors, driving truckloads of produce through the night to market. For decades, he's pursued the double life of politician and farmer, an identity his supporters say sets him apart in an age of white-collar public officials. Joe is Joe, they say — what you see is what you get. What you see is a tall, broad-shouldered man with a genial manner who seems to move easily between dark business suits and dusty work pants, who says he means to sustain small bits of this long-running juggling act even if he wins the job of Baltimore County executive, running the multibillion-dollar operation that is the county government.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 5, 2006
PALM BEACH, Fla. -- Mark Foley, until last week a fixture on this town's lofty social circuit, once recounted a party at Mar-a-Lago, Donald J. Trump's fabled estate. "Miss Germany was my date," he told a writer at Washingtonian magazine for an article called "How to Date a Congressman." It was one of the many hints that Foley dropped to mask the realities of his strictly compartmentalized life. Over 12 years in Congress, he became adept at projecting a magnetic public persona - helped by loyal aides and a sister he breezily called his surrogate wife - while conducting a private life fraught with more secrets than anyone imagined.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2004
By late January, Jeremy Navarre will have earned enough credits to leave Joppatowne High School and enroll in classes at the University of Maryland. In the spring, he will join the Terps at football practice. The senior All-Metro football player and heavyweight wrestler will take advantage of a national trend called early enrollment, a process designed to allow athletes to make an early transition to college life. But that's nothing new. What is new is the wrinkle Navarre has added, one that will allow him to retain his high school athletic eligibility long enough to compete for a third state wrestling title in March.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2003
Scientists say they may be on the threshold of a new treatment for Lou Gehrig's disease, reporting today that a novel gene therapy nearly doubled the life span of mice afflicted with the fatal, nerve-wasting disease. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University and the Salk Institute in La Jolla, Calif., said the treatment caused the mice to bulk up and slowed the destruction of nerve cells - called motor neurons - that control practically all movement, including breathing. But the scientists were equally excited about the way the treatment works - through simple, one-time injections into weakened muscles.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Kate Shatzkin contributed to this article | October 3, 1997
The convicted murderer whose double-life sentence was commuted by former Gov. William Donald Schaefer on his last day in office in 1995 has been charged with three violations of prison rules in the last three months -- alleged infractions that could hurt his chances of winning parole.Schaefer, meanwhile, said he had no regrets yesterday about commuting to 45 years the prison sentence of Scott F. Caldwell, who was represented by Schaefer's friend, former Gov. Marvin Mandel."You either have a parole system or you don't," Schaefer said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2012
Isaac Truss, his body shaking so much that the clinking of his shackles could be heard in the back of the courtroom, seemed unsure during his sentencing on two murders Wednesday whether he wanted to show remorse or try the case.  Having already pleaded guilty to killing two men in downtown Baltimore over the course of less than two days, Truss was now appearing before Circuit Court Judge Althea Handy for sentencing. But he started off the hearing by seeking to revoke his plea.  "I wanted to go to trial," he told Handy.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2003
Scientists say they may be on the threshold of a new treatment for Lou Gehrig's disease, reporting today that a novel gene therapy nearly doubled the life span of mice afflicted with the fatal, nerve-wasting disease. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University and the Salk Institute in La Jolla, Calif., said the treatment caused the mice to bulk up and slowed the destruction of nerve cells - called motor neurons - that control practically all movement, including breathing. But the scientists were equally excited about the way the treatment works - through simple, one-time injections into weakened muscles.
FEATURES
By Neal Lipschutz | January 15, 1995
Earl Shorris has led an unusual double life -- writer and salesman. A writer of books and contributing editor to Harper's magazine, he also spent a career as an advertising man and consultant to large corporations. In this pessimistic look at a world where he thinks selling in all its forms has run amok, Mr. Shorris clearly has turned against his business side.The author argues that the act of selling, morally neutral and crucial to the functioning of economic and cultural systems throughout history, has wildly overstepped its bounds to become the dominant force in America's business and social life.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Melody Simmons contributed to this article | May 22, 1994
In the summer of 1992, a blond woman in tailored business clothes began to appear on the street corners of West Baltimore, joining the lines of junkies waiting to buy heroin.In the all-black neighborhood of Franklin Square, the newcomer's presence was striking."My daughter used to have to walk right past where they distribute the drugs each day on her way home from work," recalled Joyce Smith, the Franklin Square Association president."I remember her coming home one day that summer and saying, 'Mama, you wouldn't believe it. There's a white woman with a real nice haircut, nice clothes, too, up there in the line.
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