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Double Indemnity

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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 11, 1998
The Slayton House theater in the Wilde Lake Village Center in Columbia continues its "Marvelous Movies and More" series with "Pygmalion" (1938), the film adaptation of George Bernard Shaw's play starring Leslie Howard and Wendy Hiller, tonight at 7: 30 p.m. Dessert and coffee will follow the show and film historian David Pierce will lead a short discussion. Tickets are $6. Subscriptions to the series' 10-movie program -- which this season will include "The Beloved Rogue," "Double Indemnity," "The Letter" and King Vidor's "The Crowd" -- for $48. Other rarely seen films will be shown, including the 1934 melodrama "Bulldog Drummond Strikes Back," Frank Capra's "American Madness" and Ernst Lubitsch's "One Hour With You."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Sun reporter | February 27, 2012
In his Oscar acceptance speech, "The Artist" director Michel Hazanavicius said he wanted to thank three people: "Billy Wilder, Billy Wilder and Billy Wilder. " Backstage, Hazanavicius was asked why he felt compelled to thank Wilder, the Oscar-winning director of such classics as "The Lost Weekend," "Double Indemnity" and "The Apartment," three times. "I thanked Billy Wilder three times," he replied, "because I had to keep it short. " Hazanavicius said he would have thanked his accomplished forebear 1,000 times if he could have, referring to the Austrian-born Wilder as "the perfect director" and "the soul of Hollywood.
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NEWS
August 20, 2006
ELIZABETH I -- HBO / $29.98 This dazzling four-hour film starring Helen Mirren as the 16th-century ruler who reunited England and became one of the nation's most beloved leaders earned 13 Emmy nominations -- more than either Fox's 24 or ABC's Grey's Anatomy. And they were richly deserved, particularly the one for Mirren as best actress in a miniseries. Her range is astounding. At one end of the tour de force performance, she's playfully rolling her eyes as ancient, grim-faced, male advisers urge her to heed the ticking of her biological clock and get about the business of producing an heir.
NEWS
August 12, 2007
THEATER DEMOCRACY / / 2 p.m. today. Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road, Olney. $25-$41. 301-924-3400, olneytheatre.org. ....................... Set against the backdrop of Germany in the 1970s, Democracy re-creates the relationship between former West German Chancellor Willy Brandt and the spy who loved him. Brandt's personal assistant, Gunter Guillaume, passed on copies of documents and his own insights to the Stasi, East Germany's notorious secret police. The drama by Tony Award-winning playwright Michael Frayn (Noises Off, Copenhagen)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Sun reporter | February 27, 2012
In his Oscar acceptance speech, "The Artist" director Michel Hazanavicius said he wanted to thank three people: "Billy Wilder, Billy Wilder and Billy Wilder. " Backstage, Hazanavicius was asked why he felt compelled to thank Wilder, the Oscar-winning director of such classics as "The Lost Weekend," "Double Indemnity" and "The Apartment," three times. "I thanked Billy Wilder three times," he replied, "because I had to keep it short. " Hazanavicius said he would have thanked his accomplished forebear 1,000 times if he could have, referring to the Austrian-born Wilder as "the perfect director" and "the soul of Hollywood.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 24, 2001
In his deliriously funny comedy Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993), Woody Allen, exasperated at his wife's fixation on solving a possible murder, said her problem was "Too much Double Indemnity" - referring, of course, to Billy Wilder's mesmerizing thriller about insurance fraud. The problem with Allen's latest, The Curse of the Jade Scorpion, is "Not enough Double Indemnity." This movie actually centers, like Double Indemnity, on a '40s insurance office, with Allen in the Edward G. Robinson role of master case-breaker CW Briggs.
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By Peter B. Flint and Peter B. Flint,N.Y. Times News Service | November 6, 1991
Fred MacMurray, the personable, unassuming actor who starred in some of the best film comedies of the 1930s and 40s and was later the protagonist in popular Walt Disney fantasies and the television situation comedy "My Three Sons," died Tuesday of pneumonia. He was 83.Reviewers repeatedly praised the charm, credibility and spontaneity of the 6-foot-3-inch-tall, pipe-smoking former saxophonist who had never studied acting.He had a good-guy image in nearly 80 films, but his most noted roles were cads a passion-crazed murderer in "Double Indemnity" (1944)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1999
Hard-edged guys who are a lot more gullible than they think. Slinky, sharp-tongued femme fatales who live to prey on that vulnerability. And action that, for some reason, almost always takes place at night.Think Barbara Stanwyck toying with hapless insurance salesman Fred MacMurray in "Double Indemnity," Ava Gardner shredding Burt Lancaster's heart in "The Killers," Veronica Lake instilling a fatal dose of humanity into Alan Ladd in "This Gun For Hire."Such are the essential elements of film noir, a uniquely American cinematic art form (although the French coined the term, which translates to "dark cinema")
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | July 21, 2005
SINCE THIS IS a full-service column dedicated to helping the reader at all times, I'm going to do you a huge favor today. I'm going to recommend two books to take to the beach this summer. And here's a guarantee: these will be the two best books you've ever read at the beach, period. These books are so good, you won't be able to put them down. You'll spend the whole day in your little beach chair reading, and when you finally finish, it'll be dusk and the only people around will be a couple of old guys in undershirts and Bermuda shorts with those stupid metal detectors.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 7, 2002
Fans of the late Billy Wilder are in for a serious treat this summer, as a handful of his greatest films will be given the big-screen treatment here in Baltimore. Tomorrow at the Charles, Ace in the Hole (aka The Big Carnival) will be shown at noon, with admission set at only $5. One of Wilder's most cynical films (as well as one of his most rousing), it stars Kirk Douglas as an opportunistic newspaper reporter who sees his chance for glory come when a man gets trapped inside a mine. Not only does Douglas' character cover the heck out of the story, he soon realizes that the longer the man stays trapped, the longer he can benefit from the poor guy's misfortune.
NEWS
August 20, 2006
ELIZABETH I -- HBO / $29.98 This dazzling four-hour film starring Helen Mirren as the 16th-century ruler who reunited England and became one of the nation's most beloved leaders earned 13 Emmy nominations -- more than either Fox's 24 or ABC's Grey's Anatomy. And they were richly deserved, particularly the one for Mirren as best actress in a miniseries. Her range is astounding. At one end of the tour de force performance, she's playfully rolling her eyes as ancient, grim-faced, male advisers urge her to heed the ticking of her biological clock and get about the business of producing an heir.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | July 21, 2005
SINCE THIS IS a full-service column dedicated to helping the reader at all times, I'm going to do you a huge favor today. I'm going to recommend two books to take to the beach this summer. And here's a guarantee: these will be the two best books you've ever read at the beach, period. These books are so good, you won't be able to put them down. You'll spend the whole day in your little beach chair reading, and when you finally finish, it'll be dusk and the only people around will be a couple of old guys in undershirts and Bermuda shorts with those stupid metal detectors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | June 16, 2002
In half a century of writing and moviemaking, Billy Wilder took torn-from-the-headline subjects and born-in-the-boudoir jokes and created an amazing closed universe of wit. To see his movies is to enter an environment in which all the cracks are wise -- and no simple feeling can emerge unscathed. As a writer or director or both, he gave us some of the smartest entertainments in Hollywood history, from Midnight and Ninotchka in 1939 to Some Like It Hot in 1959. And movies like Double Indemnity (1944)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 7, 2002
Fans of the late Billy Wilder are in for a serious treat this summer, as a handful of his greatest films will be given the big-screen treatment here in Baltimore. Tomorrow at the Charles, Ace in the Hole (aka The Big Carnival) will be shown at noon, with admission set at only $5. One of Wilder's most cynical films (as well as one of his most rousing), it stars Kirk Douglas as an opportunistic newspaper reporter who sees his chance for glory come when a man gets trapped inside a mine. Not only does Douglas' character cover the heck out of the story, he soon realizes that the longer the man stays trapped, the longer he can benefit from the poor guy's misfortune.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 24, 2001
In his deliriously funny comedy Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993), Woody Allen, exasperated at his wife's fixation on solving a possible murder, said her problem was "Too much Double Indemnity" - referring, of course, to Billy Wilder's mesmerizing thriller about insurance fraud. The problem with Allen's latest, The Curse of the Jade Scorpion, is "Not enough Double Indemnity." This movie actually centers, like Double Indemnity, on a '40s insurance office, with Allen in the Edward G. Robinson role of master case-breaker CW Briggs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | June 17, 2001
The American Film Institute calls it a list of the "100 greatest American thrillers." But it might as well call them the 100 greatest American movies-that-aren't-comedies. The list, unveiled last week during a three-hour special on CBS, ranged from "The Adventures of Robin Hood" (No. 100) to "Psycho" (No. 1). And while it's always a treat to see snippets from so many films, and to listen to people talk about them (though I wonder what qualified Lucy Liu to be on camera almost as often as Steven Spielberg)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 29, 1993
"Fatal Instinct" has a basic attraction: lots of handsome and beautiful people making horses' asses of themselves. It's really stupid. I like that in a movie.The film is one of those joke-dense parodies inspired by (but not as inspired as) "Airplane" and the "Naked Gun" movies of the fabled Zucker-Zucker-Abrahams team, with an original impetus provided by the old Mad magazine in its "Scenes We'd Like to See" department.The subject at hand is film noir, those dank and swozzled tales of lust and betrayal that emerged after World War II with their night city photography and their existential hubris, and that persist to this day in sunnier but smuttier suburbs.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | February 17, 1992
As a prosecutor for the Los Angeles District Attorney's office for eight years, Vincent Bugliosi tried nearly 1,000 felony and misdemeanor cases, losing just one of his 106 felony jury trials. His most famous was the Charles Manson case, which became the basis of his best-selling book "Helter Skelter" and the 1976 TV movie of the same name.The new NBC thriller, "Till Death Us Do Part," (tonight at 9 on Channel 2) is adapted from Mr. Bugliosi's 1978 account of a controversial 1967 murder case in which he found himself pitted against Alan Palliko (played by Treat Williams)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1999
Hard-edged guys who are a lot more gullible than they think. Slinky, sharp-tongued femme fatales who live to prey on that vulnerability. And action that, for some reason, almost always takes place at night.Think Barbara Stanwyck toying with hapless insurance salesman Fred MacMurray in "Double Indemnity," Ava Gardner shredding Burt Lancaster's heart in "The Killers," Veronica Lake instilling a fatal dose of humanity into Alan Ladd in "This Gun For Hire."Such are the essential elements of film noir, a uniquely American cinematic art form (although the French coined the term, which translates to "dark cinema")
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 11, 1998
The Slayton House theater in the Wilde Lake Village Center in Columbia continues its "Marvelous Movies and More" series with "Pygmalion" (1938), the film adaptation of George Bernard Shaw's play starring Leslie Howard and Wendy Hiller, tonight at 7: 30 p.m. Dessert and coffee will follow the show and film historian David Pierce will lead a short discussion. Tickets are $6. Subscriptions to the series' 10-movie program -- which this season will include "The Beloved Rogue," "Double Indemnity," "The Letter" and King Vidor's "The Crowd" -- for $48. Other rarely seen films will be shown, including the 1934 melodrama "Bulldog Drummond Strikes Back," Frank Capra's "American Madness" and Ernst Lubitsch's "One Hour With You."
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