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By Joan Drake and By Joan Drake,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 9, 2000
Has Valentine's Day caught you by surprise -- and unprepared? There's still time to dip some strawberries in chocolate for an impressive dessert or gift. Large berries with long stems are the most dramatic, but any that are ripe, without soft spots and bright red may be used. Clean the berries gently with a soft pastry brush. If you prefer to wash them, swish in water, then drain on paper towels for several hours until thoroughly dry. Dipping even slightly moist berries will cause the chocolate to thicken and become dull.
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By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2010
Considering all that mothers do, a decent breakfast on Mother's Day shouldn't be too much to ask. But often that means standing in a restaurant line waiting for a table, or a sitcom version of breakfast in bed, with burnt toast, spilled juice and a forced smile. Brunch classics such as eggs Benedict can be intimidating, and traditional French toast can be pedestrian. But not in the kitchen of chef Michael Wagner of Baltimore International College. "There's nothing to stop you from enjoying these at home and impressing your mother or your wife," said the instructor.
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By Ronnie Fein and Ronnie Fein,Special to the Sun | October 14, 2001
Brownies are like magnets; people are drawn to them as if by some inherent, natural power. From the first seduction by smell as the brownies bake, to the last caress of tender crumbs on the tongue, this is the delectable force: sweet, melted chocolate mixed with just enough ingredients to give it some form. It is potent stuff, made for sheer enjoyment. It's simple stuff, too. The recipe is fairly straightforward, but simple recipes are often the most difficult to perfect. Purists will tell you that the only way to eat a brownie is plain, as is. But how many folks can pass up a brownie sundae?
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | December 10, 2003
Mom always told you not to play with your food, but Christmas is the one time of year when you can ignore that rule. Grown-ups and kids hunker over gingerbread houses, applying gobs of royal icing to roofs and windows. Hershey's Kisses are stuck onto Styrofoam cones to make Christmas trees, and candy canes and gumdrops are turned into reindeer and snowmen. The most important thing to keep in mind when creating food crafts, says Joanne Hoff, an associate director of Kraft Kitchens, is: "Keep it simple."
FEATURES
By ELISE T. CHISOLM | April 11, 1995
The other day, I had to fix, as in mutilate, boil, broil or do something to, some oysters. A close friend brought us a dozen fresh oysters in a jar from the Eastern Shore.One of my husband's favorite things in life is oyster stew. This time, I had no excuse not to fix the stew. Since I'd avoided working with the little critters all these years, I knew it was time in my old age to deal with them.I can't stand to look at oysters, smell them, eat them or watch someone slurp them.I'm sorry. I have tried to like them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2010
Considering all that mothers do, a decent breakfast on Mother's Day shouldn't be too much to ask. But often that means standing in a restaurant line waiting for a table, or a sitcom version of breakfast in bed, with burnt toast, spilled juice and a forced smile. Brunch classics such as eggs Benedict can be intimidating, and traditional French toast can be pedestrian. But not in the kitchen of chef Michael Wagner of Baltimore International College. "There's nothing to stop you from enjoying these at home and impressing your mother or your wife," said the instructor.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | December 10, 2003
Mom always told you not to play with your food, but Christmas is the one time of year when you can ignore that rule. Grown-ups and kids hunker over gingerbread houses, applying gobs of royal icing to roofs and windows. Hershey's Kisses are stuck onto Styrofoam cones to make Christmas trees, and candy canes and gumdrops are turned into reindeer and snowmen. The most important thing to keep in mind when creating food crafts, says Joanne Hoff, an associate director of Kraft Kitchens, is: "Keep it simple."
FEATURES
October 16, 1991
Don't throw away hardened brown sugar. Use these tips to save it.* Put a wedge of apple into the box or bag of sugar and reclose it, then microwave on high power for 20 seconds per cup of sugar; let it stand for five minutes; repeat if necessary.* Put it, in its bag (but not box), in a 350-degree oven. By the time the bag is warm, the sugar should be softened or delumped.* Push it through a sieve.* Roll it out with a rolling pin.* Steam it in the top of a double boiler.* Put it through a food processor, blender or meat grinder.
FEATURES
By Newsday | August 25, 1999
This recipe to feed a crowd, from "Dinner at Miss Lady's: Memories and Recipes From a Southern Childhood" by Luann Landon (Algonquin Books, $19.95), uses egg yolks with wild abandon. It is useful to know how to make a boiled dressing as well as a homemade mayonnaise; they make a simple dish like chicken salad company-worthy.Homemade MayonnaiseMakes 2 cups4 egg yolks2 cups light olive oil, peanut oil or canola oilsalt and pepper to taste2 tablespoons (or more, to taste) white-wine vinegarUsing an electric mixer and small bowl, beat egg yolks on low speed for 2 minutes.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 31, 1999
Ask me to name my favorite flavor in the world, and without even pausing, my response would be chocolate. Like countless others, I am a confirmed chocoholic.Hardly a day passes that I don't indulge in some type of chocolate confection. My habit, however, brings with it guilt; while nibbling, I subconsciously remind myself of the calories and fat grams these morsels contain. At only one time of the year do I luxuriate in rich chocolate creations with no concern, and that, of course, is on Valentine's Day.Every winter as this holiday approaches, I look forward to preparing a chocolate dessert for Feb. 14. My husband and I often eat out on this date, but I still like to have something chocolate waiting at home.
NEWS
By Ronnie Fein and Ronnie Fein,Special to the Sun | October 14, 2001
Brownies are like magnets; people are drawn to them as if by some inherent, natural power. From the first seduction by smell as the brownies bake, to the last caress of tender crumbs on the tongue, this is the delectable force: sweet, melted chocolate mixed with just enough ingredients to give it some form. It is potent stuff, made for sheer enjoyment. It's simple stuff, too. The recipe is fairly straightforward, but simple recipes are often the most difficult to perfect. Purists will tell you that the only way to eat a brownie is plain, as is. But how many folks can pass up a brownie sundae?
FEATURES
By Joan Drake and By Joan Drake,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 9, 2000
Has Valentine's Day caught you by surprise -- and unprepared? There's still time to dip some strawberries in chocolate for an impressive dessert or gift. Large berries with long stems are the most dramatic, but any that are ripe, without soft spots and bright red may be used. Clean the berries gently with a soft pastry brush. If you prefer to wash them, swish in water, then drain on paper towels for several hours until thoroughly dry. Dipping even slightly moist berries will cause the chocolate to thicken and become dull.
FEATURES
By ELISE T. CHISOLM | April 11, 1995
The other day, I had to fix, as in mutilate, boil, broil or do something to, some oysters. A close friend brought us a dozen fresh oysters in a jar from the Eastern Shore.One of my husband's favorite things in life is oyster stew. This time, I had no excuse not to fix the stew. Since I'd avoided working with the little critters all these years, I knew it was time in my old age to deal with them.I can't stand to look at oysters, smell them, eat them or watch someone slurp them.I'm sorry. I have tried to like them.
FEATURES
By Lisa Gutierrez and Lisa Gutierrez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 6, 2002
Weeks of cold, brisk winter days lie ahead, weather that just begs to be spent in the company of a hot toddy - with or without the alcohol. A hot toddy can be as simple as coffee with some sinful hot chocolate mix or as involved as a hot drink frothed in a blender. Hot Chocolate Makes 1 serving 12 ounces fine chocolate 1 teaspoon butter (not margarine) 1/2 teaspoon vanilla 1 cup half-and-half whipped cream mini marshmallows Melt the chocolate, butter and vanilla in a double boiler.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | March 6, 1991
WELCOME OUR RETURNING heros with this festive yellow ribbon cake.Use your favorite cake recipe and icing and top it with this easy to make yellow ribbon.The ribbon is made from candy coating, available in cake decorating and candy making stores. The ribbon can be eaten.Check your phone directory for candy and cake decorating stores that sell candy coating.This recipe will make enough candy to create several ribbons. Make extra ribbons for friends or store the extra candy in the refrigerator.
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