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February 15, 2006
A Brazilian bobsledder who tested positive for steroids in a pre-Olympic drug test became the first athlete sent home from the Turin Games for doping. Armando dos Santos failed the test in early January when a sample showed evidence of the steroid nandrolone, according to a statement posted on the Brazilian Olympic Committee's Web site. Dos Santos, a former hammer thrower, will be replaced on the four-man team by Claudinei Quirino - a silver medalist in the 400-meter relay at the 2000 Sydney Olympics.
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SPORTS
February 15, 2006
A Brazilian bobsledder who tested positive for steroids in a pre-Olympic drug test became the first athlete sent home from the Turin Games for doping. Armando dos Santos failed the test in early January when a sample showed evidence of the steroid nandrolone, according to a statement posted on the Brazilian Olympic Committee's Web site. Dos Santos, a former hammer thrower, will be replaced on the four-man team by Claudinei Quirino - a silver medalist in the 400-meter relay at the 2000 Sydney Olympics.
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NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2000
For almost 20 years, there were two worlds inside Rene R. Bonetti's suburban Maryland home. One belonged to Bonetti, his wife and son. It included regular trips to their native Brazil, an Alfa Romeo sports car and a high-paying engineering job. Federal prosecutors would describe it as an "affluent world of fine and expensive things." The other belonged to Brazilian immigrant Hilda Rosa Dos Santos. It included a windowless basement room in the Bonettis' four-bedroom Gaithersburg home, a cot to sleep on, unpaid labor and regular beatings.
SPORTS
By Elliott Denman and Elliott Denman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 11, 2005
HELSINKI, Finland - At 5 feet 10 and 165 pounds, Joel Brown is not one of the bigger men running the high hurdles on the international circuit. But he's as gritty as they come and concedes nothing to the taller hurdlers and those 10 unrelenting, 42-inch barriers he faces in his specialty event. A career-best 13.22-second performance earlier this year was proof that the 25-year-old Woodlawn High and Ohio State alumnus had, indeed, arrived as an elite athlete, and his spot in tonight's semifinals of the 110-meter hurdles at the 10th world championships of track and field serves as Exhibit B. Brown advanced to the semis with a 13.90 third-place performance in the face of a brutal, 1.8-meter-per-second wind lashing into every runner in the sixth and final opening-round race yesterday morning at Olympic Stadium.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 15, 1992
LUANDA, Angola -- Angola's government and the main opposition group have begun indirect talks in an effort to avert a return to civil war over the disputed elections held last month. But the two sides appeared to be far apart.The talks are being mediated by South African Foreign Minister Roelof F. Botha, who has been trying to steer the two main antagonists, President Jose Eduardo dos Santos and Jonas Savimbi of the opposition UNITA, into face-to-face negotiations.Mr. Botha's role in Angola's political imbroglio has become crucial because Mr. Savimbi has refused to meet with senior officials from the United States, Mr. Savimbi's biggest backer during UNITA's 16-year insurgency against the leftist government.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2000
A federal judge ordered a Maryland man to pay $110,000 yesterday in back wages to an Brazilian immigrant he kept in his home illegally for 15 years as an unpaid servant. But the woman, now 65 and living off the charity of church groups, won't see the paycheck soon. At a sentencing hearing, U.S. District Judge Deborah K. Chasanow ordered Rene R. Bonetti to pay the restitution after completing a 6 1/2 -year prison term for violating immigration laws. Bonetti, 52, jailed since his conviction in February, plans to appeal.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 17, 2002
A man was killed and a woman injured yesterday when their sport utility vehicle collided with a car in Howard County, police said. About 2 p.m., Juan F. Dos Santos, 23, of the 400 block of Kent Ave. in Catonsville was driving a Mitsubishi Montero north on Route 29. He was weaving through traffic and passing other vehicles on the shoulder, police said. As the vehicle re-entered the slow lane, it struck the right front of a Chevrolet Malibu, sending it across the northbound lanes and the grass median before it came to rest in the southbound lanes.
NEWS
June 3, 1993
The Clinton administration's recognition of the Angolan government of Jose Eduardo dos Santos may be correct policy but it is not shutting down that country's long civil war. After Angolan independence in 1976, Washington shunned the Luanda regime because it was Communist, unelected, not in control of all territory and dependent on Cuban troops. Ironically, Cuban troops defended American oil installations from the depredations of U.S-backed UNITA guerrillas.Not much of this Cold War rationale was left after the Bush administration and the Gorbachev Kremlin put down their hatchets and the formerly Communist government of Mr. dos Santos won an election over a strong showing by the U.S.-backed UNITA of Jonas Savimbi.
NEWS
October 15, 1992
What if you held a free election that observers called fair in a Communist-ruled country wracked 16 years by civil war, and the Communists won? They would swear, of course, to being ex-Marxists. This is what happened in Angola. The election the United States had sought was held, and the U.S. is properly abiding by its results.The founding president of Angola, Agostinho Neto, turned it into as close to a Communist state as African conditions allow. On his death in 1979, successor Jose Eduardo dos Santos kept his faith.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 26, 2002
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The video of his bloodied corpse broadcast around the world last weekend left no doubt that the Angolan government's claims were true: Jonas Savimbi, the flamboyant rebel leader in one of Africa's longest-running civil wars, was dead. Residents of Angola's capital, Luanda, greeted news of Savimbi's death with fireworks, cheers and honking car horns, hoping that, finally, three decades of war will be buried with him. But while Savimbi's death could refocus the world's attention on a forgotten southern African conflict that long ago exhausted the patience of the international community, creating a lasting peace will be difficult.
NEWS
February 27, 2002
JONAS SAVIMBI was a survivor. He outlasted Cold War rivalries and apartheid South Africa, which financed his long struggle to topple Angola's Marxist government. After outside support dried up, he kept the war going by mining some of the world's finest diamonds. His slaying last week, at the age of 67, may finally bring a chance for peace in that southwest African country. This is why timing was so opportune for this week's meeting between President Bush and Angola's President Jose Eduardo dos Santos.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 26, 2002
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The video of his bloodied corpse broadcast around the world last weekend left no doubt that the Angolan government's claims were true: Jonas Savimbi, the flamboyant rebel leader in one of Africa's longest-running civil wars, was dead. Residents of Angola's capital, Luanda, greeted news of Savimbi's death with fireworks, cheers and honking car horns, hoping that, finally, three decades of war will be buried with him. But while Savimbi's death could refocus the world's attention on a forgotten southern African conflict that long ago exhausted the patience of the international community, creating a lasting peace will be difficult.
NEWS
February 17, 2002
In Howard County Catonsville man dies, woman is hurt in Route 29 accident ELLICOTT CITY -- A man was killed and a woman injured yesterday when their sport utility vehicle collided with a car on Route 29, police said. About 2 p.m., Juan F. Dos Santos, 23, of the 400 block of Kent Ave. in Catonsville was driving north on Route 29. He was weaving through traffic and passing other vehicles on the shoulder when his vehicle struck the right front of a Chevrolet Malibu, police said. Dos Santos and a passenger, Bianca Bacarreza, 20, of the 400 block of Blue Wing Court in Columbia, were thrown from the vehicle.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 17, 2002
A man was killed and a woman injured yesterday when their sport utility vehicle collided with a car in Howard County, police said. About 2 p.m., Juan F. Dos Santos, 23, of the 400 block of Kent Ave. in Catonsville was driving a Mitsubishi Montero north on Route 29. He was weaving through traffic and passing other vehicles on the shoulder, police said. As the vehicle re-entered the slow lane, it struck the right front of a Chevrolet Malibu, sending it across the northbound lanes and the grass median before it came to rest in the southbound lanes.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2000
A federal judge ordered a Maryland man to pay $110,000 yesterday in back wages to an Brazilian immigrant he kept in his home illegally for 15 years as an unpaid servant. But the woman, now 65 and living off the charity of church groups, won't see the paycheck soon. At a sentencing hearing, U.S. District Judge Deborah K. Chasanow ordered Rene R. Bonetti to pay the restitution after completing a 6 1/2 -year prison term for violating immigration laws. Bonetti, 52, jailed since his conviction in February, plans to appeal.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2000
For almost 20 years, there were two worlds inside Rene R. Bonetti's suburban Maryland home. One belonged to Bonetti, his wife and son. It included regular trips to their native Brazil, an Alfa Romeo sports car and a high-paying engineering job. Federal prosecutors would describe it as an "affluent world of fine and expensive things." The other belonged to Brazilian immigrant Hilda Rosa Dos Santos. It included a windowless basement room in the Bonettis' four-bedroom Gaithersburg home, a cot to sleep on, unpaid labor and regular beatings.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | May 24, 1997
FIVE COUNTRIES form an arc beginning with equatorial Uganda in the east of Africa, running southwestward to the Atlantic, including little Rwanda and Burundi and giant Congo-Kinshasa (formerly Zaire) and Angola.Combined, they have about one-third the population of the United States on about two-fifths the land area.On the surface, little links them. They represent hundreds of ethnicities, various ideologies, four colonial heritages and three European languages.What they have in common is an alliance of rulers and an absence of U.S. influence.
NEWS
February 17, 2002
In Howard County Catonsville man dies, woman is hurt in Route 29 accident ELLICOTT CITY -- A man was killed and a woman injured yesterday when their sport utility vehicle collided with a car on Route 29, police said. About 2 p.m., Juan F. Dos Santos, 23, of the 400 block of Kent Ave. in Catonsville was driving north on Route 29. He was weaving through traffic and passing other vehicles on the shoulder when his vehicle struck the right front of a Chevrolet Malibu, police said. Dos Santos and a passenger, Bianca Bacarreza, 20, of the 400 block of Blue Wing Court in Columbia, were thrown from the vehicle.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2000
Convicted of violating immigration laws by keeping a Brazilian woman in his home as a live-in slave, Rene R. Bonetti started quietly moving his assets overseas to avoid paying the woman as much as $160,000 in restitution, federal investigators say. Last week, a federal judge froze Bonetti's assets after FBI investigators documented that Bonetti, 51, was selling his property and arranging to have his belongings shipped from his Gaithersburg home to...
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | May 24, 1997
FIVE COUNTRIES form an arc beginning with equatorial Uganda in the east of Africa, running southwestward to the Atlantic, including little Rwanda and Burundi and giant Congo-Kinshasa (formerly Zaire) and Angola.Combined, they have about one-third the population of the United States on about two-fifths the land area.On the surface, little links them. They represent hundreds of ethnicities, various ideologies, four colonial heritages and three European languages.What they have in common is an alliance of rulers and an absence of U.S. influence.
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