Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDorr
IN THE NEWS

Dorr

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 17, 2004
DORR EUGENE FELT TIPPENS of Baltimore and Gibson Island, age 80, on Saturday, October 16, 2004. Survived by his wife Doris Willsey Tippens; his children, Rebecca Anne Tippens, Constance Felt Tippens, Dorr Felt Tippens; and his grandchildren, Dmitri Tippens Krushnic and wife Victoria Vantoch, Sasha Collins Krushnic, Madeleine Willsey Tippens, Georges Felt Tippens and Savery Maire Hinton. Memorial Service details will be announced. Instead of flowers, contributions may be made to Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins Hospital or any Hospice.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lily Hua and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
As the head bartender and mixologist at B&O American Brasserie, Brendan Dorr, 34, has concocted drinks for every type of occasion for his restaurant's guests. But in September, Dorr will have the chance that only 14 mixologists from around the country have: showcasing a concoction at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. The National Museum of American History and Smithsonian Channel are toasting to the 200 th anniversary of the Star-Spangled Banner with an event called Raise a Glass to History.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2004
Dorr Eugene Felt Tippens, a chemical engineer and decorated World War II aviator who devised the formula for a type of brown sugar, died of leukemia Saturday at Roland Park Place. He was 80 and had lived for many years on Gibson Island. Born in Grand Rapids, Mich., Mr. Tippens was named for his grandfather, Dorr Eugene Felt, inventor of the Comptometer, an early business calculator. He earned a chemical engineering degree from Purdue University, but interrupted his studies to enlist in the Army Air Forces.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | November 10, 2011
It's another accolade for B&O American Brasserie. B&O's Brendan Dorr won first place at the this year's Vinos de Jerez Cocktail Competition on Wednesday at the Clover Club in Brooklyn, N.Y. His cocktail, the Cadizian, earned Dorr a trip to the Sherry capital of the world, Jerez, Spain, and a full scholarship to the Beverage Alcohol Resource school in New York. The competition asked 12 finalists to present a cocktail using any style of Sherry from any bodgea in Jerez. Dorr, who describes his cocktail as a "take on the Manhattan," used Oloroso Dulce to beat out mixologists from all over the country, including San Francisco, St. Louis, New York City and more.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Columnist | October 24, 2006
Clifford Hartley Dorr was utterly "disgusted" when he saw the $3.50 Baltimore Telecom Surcharge on his Cingular Wireless bill. As a longtime Baltimore County resident, Dorr kindly explained, he took great exception to being charged a Baltimore City cell phone tax. A reasonable gripe, most certainly. Adding fuel to his resentment, Dorr noticed early in the summer that his $19.99-a-month service plan for 50 anytime minutes suddenly jumped to $29.99 for 100 anytime minutes. With that jump in price, Dorr was spending hours on the phone every month calling the Atlanta-based company's customer service line to tell them that he had never requested a higher-priced plan, nor did he need it. In fact, Dorr spent more time talking to Cingular than people he wanted to talk to. "Look, I only carry my cell phone in case of emergencies," said the 79-year-old, who was born and raised in Baltimore and has lived in Arbutus for 13 years.
NEWS
July 1, 2003
On June 30, 2003, HELEN T., beloved wife of the late Louis Cashen; devoted mother of Mickey Cashen, Donna Dorr and her husband Brian, Tim Cashen and his wife Lori; loving grandmother of Ryan Dorr; dear sister of Frank Griscavage, Eleanor Swantkowski, Sally Florek and Martha Bigus . Friends may call at the family owned and operated George J. Gonce Funeral Home P.A., 4001 Ritchie Hwy, on Tuesday and Wednesday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Mass of Christian Burial...
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | January 21, 1994
The Annapolis Elks Lodge, a fixture on Rowe Boulevard since 1960, has a contract to purchase a piece of property outside the city limits and move there, possibly within the next year.Vernon J. "Joe" Dorr, exalted ruler of the lodge, said yesterday that members have been looking to move for several years and that a Maryland Court of Appeals decision last week threatening their liquor license spurred them to act.The 1,360 members of Lodge No. 622 voted Wednesday to sell their 6.9 acre property on Rowe Boulevard to the state for $3.6 million.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2005
THE SQUEAKY wheel is the one that usually gets the grease, at least that's what Bonnie Dorr, chairwoman of OC-29, is hoping. The group was organized by Dorr and others in her community surrounding U.S. 29 at Old Columbia Road because of the dangers that intersection presents. OC-29 met recently with community, county and state representatives at Emmanuel United Methodist Church in Laurel. Among those attending were Howard County Executive James N. Robey, County Council Chairman Guy Guzzone, Councilman Charles C. Feaga, and all four District 13 legislators (State Sen. Sandra B. Schrader and Dels.
NEWS
January 8, 1995
Charles A. BurkeBGE foremanCharles A. Burke, who was wounded on Iwo Jima in World War II and worked 34 years for Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., died Wednesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of a stroke. The Linthicum resident was 74.Mr. Burke worked for BGE as a foreman on gas distribution crews and an instructor. He retired in 1981."He was quite proud of his contributions during the war," said his son-in-law, Doug Foster.Mr. Burke, a Marine medical corpsman, received a Purple Heart after being wounded on the second or third day of the February 1945 assault to capture Iwo Jima, one of two islands that $H guarded the approach to Japan from the south.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | April 22, 1994
The seven-week strike at Poly-Seal Corp., a Baltimore-based maker of plastic caps and seals, ended yesterday after workers accepted a new three-year contract that is only slightly different than one they had earlier rejected.The provisions of the contract are similar to those turned downlast week, except the new contract includes a cap on increases in health insurance payments by workers and commits the union and the company to try to find a less expensive health care plan, said Eugene W. Dorr, staff representative of the United Steelworkers of America District 8.The vote to ratify the contract was 189 to 79, Mr. Dorr said.
NEWS
October 4, 2007
On October 1, 2007 loving wife of Robert H. Stansbury; beloved mother of Therese Horwath of Heathsville, VA, Roberta Newell of Silver Spring, MD, Patricia Erdelatz of Ripon, CA, Robert H. Stansbury, Jr. of Arnold, MD, Timothy E. Stansbury of Millersville, MD, H. Douglas Stansbury of Snellville, GA and Jane Hamblin of Mooresville, NC; sister of Betty O'Neill of Hyattsville, MD; devoted grandmother of 23; great-grandmother of 38; great-great-grandmother of...
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Columnist | October 24, 2006
Clifford Hartley Dorr was utterly "disgusted" when he saw the $3.50 Baltimore Telecom Surcharge on his Cingular Wireless bill. As a longtime Baltimore County resident, Dorr kindly explained, he took great exception to being charged a Baltimore City cell phone tax. A reasonable gripe, most certainly. Adding fuel to his resentment, Dorr noticed early in the summer that his $19.99-a-month service plan for 50 anytime minutes suddenly jumped to $29.99 for 100 anytime minutes. With that jump in price, Dorr was spending hours on the phone every month calling the Atlanta-based company's customer service line to tell them that he had never requested a higher-priced plan, nor did he need it. In fact, Dorr spent more time talking to Cingular than people he wanted to talk to. "Look, I only carry my cell phone in case of emergencies," said the 79-year-old, who was born and raised in Baltimore and has lived in Arbutus for 13 years.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 2, 2006
After taking an early lead, the UMBC women's team held off a Boston University comeback and upset the 11th-ranked Terriers, 16-13, yesterday. The host Retrievers (6-4, 2-0) were led by sophomore attack Ali Levendusky, who had four goals and an assist. Freshman midfielder Kara Dorr also scored four goals. The Terriers came back late in the first half with five straight goals, including three by Lindsay Lewis. Boston scored twice early in the second half on free-position shots to tie it for the first time since the game was scoreless, but could not take the lead.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2005
THE SQUEAKY wheel is the one that usually gets the grease, at least that's what Bonnie Dorr, chairwoman of OC-29, is hoping. The group was organized by Dorr and others in her community surrounding U.S. 29 at Old Columbia Road because of the dangers that intersection presents. OC-29 met recently with community, county and state representatives at Emmanuel United Methodist Church in Laurel. Among those attending were Howard County Executive James N. Robey, County Council Chairman Guy Guzzone, Councilman Charles C. Feaga, and all four District 13 legislators (State Sen. Sandra B. Schrader and Dels.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2004
Dorr Eugene Felt Tippens, a chemical engineer and decorated World War II aviator who devised the formula for a type of brown sugar, died of leukemia Saturday at Roland Park Place. He was 80 and had lived for many years on Gibson Island. Born in Grand Rapids, Mich., Mr. Tippens was named for his grandfather, Dorr Eugene Felt, inventor of the Comptometer, an early business calculator. He earned a chemical engineering degree from Purdue University, but interrupted his studies to enlist in the Army Air Forces.
NEWS
October 17, 2004
DORR EUGENE FELT TIPPENS of Baltimore and Gibson Island, age 80, on Saturday, October 16, 2004. Survived by his wife Doris Willsey Tippens; his children, Rebecca Anne Tippens, Constance Felt Tippens, Dorr Felt Tippens; and his grandchildren, Dmitri Tippens Krushnic and wife Victoria Vantoch, Sasha Collins Krushnic, Madeleine Willsey Tippens, Georges Felt Tippens and Savery Maire Hinton. Memorial Service details will be announced. Instead of flowers, contributions may be made to Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins Hospital or any Hospice.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | April 14, 1994
Striking workers rejected Poly-Seal Corp.'s latest contract offer yesterday, and the maker of plastic caps and container seals said it will begin hiring permanent replacements."
NEWS
April 8, 1993
John RocchiRetired contractorJohn Rocchi, a retired contractor, died Monday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center after a stroke. He was 97 and lived on Pot Spring Road in Timonium.He retired in 1961 as a partner in the Rocchi Construction Corp., which he and two sons-in-law started in 1946. He also had worked for the Lacchi Construction Co. and at Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point plant.Born in Pitigliano, Italy, he came to Baltimore in 1914.Graveside services were to be conducted at 11 a.m. today at the Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens and Mausoleum, 200 E. Padonia Road, Timonium.
NEWS
July 1, 2003
On June 30, 2003, HELEN T., beloved wife of the late Louis Cashen; devoted mother of Mickey Cashen, Donna Dorr and her husband Brian, Tim Cashen and his wife Lori; loving grandmother of Ryan Dorr; dear sister of Frank Griscavage, Eleanor Swantkowski, Sally Florek and Martha Bigus . Friends may call at the family owned and operated George J. Gonce Funeral Home P.A., 4001 Ritchie Hwy, on Tuesday and Wednesday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Mass of Christian Burial...
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2000
Earlier this month, Hadden Clark, convicted of killing 6-year-old Michele Dorr, who disappeared from her Montgomery County home in 1986, finally led Montgomery County police to her grave in a park near the Capital Beltway. As the discovery of the grave brought an end to the 13-year-old mystery, it recalled the mysterious and still unexplained disappearance of the Lyon sisters nearly a quarter of a century ago from Wheaton Plaza Shopping Center. Katherine and Sheila Lyon, who lived in nearby Kensington, had gone to Wheaton Plaza on March 25, 1975, to buy a pizza.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.