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Dorothy Dandridge

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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 15, 1999
Jim Wheeler's Dorothy Dandridge Exhibit will make an exclusive East Coast stop in Baltimore at the Heritage Shadows of the Silver Screen Museum and Cinema starting Feb. 19."Dorothy Dandridge: The Actress, the Myth, the Sister," a collection of photographs, film costumes and memorabilia from the life of the legendary actress, will be on view at the museum through Feb. 28. Museum founder Mike Johnson also will play host to two private showings of "Porgy and Bess," the 1959 film starring Dandridge and Sidney Poitier, Feb. 19 and 20. The events will benefit the Heritage's building fund.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 19, 2002
As the emotionally spent and psychologically tattered wife who unwittingly seeks solace in the arms of the racist white prison guard who oversaw her husband's final days, Halle Berry gives what may be the year's rawest, most devastating performance in Monster's Ball. It finally should elevate the 33-year-old actress above the ranks of the simply beautiful. It may even win her an Oscar. Leticia Musgrove couldn't have been an easy part to play. She's a woman without a tether. Her husband has been executed.
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By SLOANE BROWN | August 29, 1999
She helped blaze the trail in Tinseltown for many of today's African-American actors. Dorothy Dandridge was the first black woman to be nominated for an Academy Award for best actress, for her starring role in the 1954 film "Carmen Jones." Now her life story is an HBO film. "Introducing Dorothy Dandridge" had its Baltimore premiere at the Senator Theatre, with HBO and TCI Communications of Baltimore serving as hosts of the event. Among the 800 people who packed the theater to enjoy a bit of Hollywood history, along with their popcorn, were Lisa Bryant, HBO affiliate relations director; Jean Davis, TCI Communications director; Rose Greene, executive secretary of the Baltimore Film Commission; Michael Johnson, founder of Heritage Shadows of the Silver Screen; Harriette Taylor, Baltimore City deputy comptroller; Debby Haskins, Loyola College assistant professor; Maria Broom, actress and dancer; and Gary Myers, Armani specialist at Saks Fifth Avenue.
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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 4, 2000
A group of Latino and black industry insiders is hoping to broaden the idea of a "crossover" from just success in the white community to mean making movies that appeal to the nation's two largest minority groups. "We are trying to bring the two worlds and audiences together because it makes sense," said Debra Martin Chase, executive vice president of Whitney Houston's BrownHouse Productions. "As substantial minority groups, there are social and political situations that are common to both.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1999
Dorothy Dandridge was an immensely talented performer who has never received her due, and maybe HBO's "Introducing Dorothy Dandridge" will change that. More power to it.It's too bad the movie, premiering tonight at 9, couldn't generate some of the same electricity Dandridge displayed both onscreen and onstage. And it's even worse that the writers couldn't make this biopic, featuring Halle Berry in a lovely but shallow performance, as exciting as it is inspirational.Dandridge, who died in 1965 at age 42 of a possibly accidental drug overdose, certainly deserves better than the footnote status she's been relegated to for years.
FEATURES
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 4, 2000
A group of Latino and black industry insiders is hoping to broaden the idea of a "crossover" from just success in the white community to mean making movies that appeal to the nation's two largest minority groups. "We are trying to bring the two worlds and audiences together because it makes sense," said Debra Martin Chase, executive vice president of Whitney Houston's BrownHouse Productions. "As substantial minority groups, there are social and political situations that are common to both.
FEATURES
By Beth Harris | August 19, 1999
LOS ANGELES -- It was a Saturday in Cleveland, and Halle Berry tuned in the local UHF channel for the afternoon movie.The black-and-white screen sparkled with Dorothy Dandridge singing and dancing in the 1954 film "Carmen Jones," featuring an all-black cast. Berry, then 18 and living in an all-white suburb, was transfixed."Wow, everybody else in this movie is black, too, and they're talented and beautiful," she recalls thinking at the time. "This seems like a happy place. I want to go wherever they are."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 19, 2002
As the emotionally spent and psychologically tattered wife who unwittingly seeks solace in the arms of the racist white prison guard who oversaw her husband's final days, Halle Berry gives what may be the year's rawest, most devastating performance in Monster's Ball. It finally should elevate the 33-year-old actress above the ranks of the simply beautiful. It may even win her an Oscar. Leticia Musgrove couldn't have been an easy part to play. She's a woman without a tether. Her husband has been executed.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | February 10, 1998
A legacy that began with a 1903 silent version of "Uncle Tom's Cabin" and extends through such legendary performers as Ethel Waters, Dorothy Dandridge, Lena Horne and Sidney Poitier is chronicled in AMC's tribute to Black History Month, "Small Steps, Big Strides" (10 p.m.-11 p.m.).African-American actors were rarely seen on the silent screen; usually black parts were played by white actors (as was true in D.W. Griffith's epic -- and shamelessly racist -- "Birth of a Nation").Change was slow in coming; one of the first African-American stars, Stepin Fetchit, achieved fame by playing a stereotype so offensive that, even in its day, it was criticized.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 26, 1998
MICHAEL JOHNSON sat amid the paint cans and stepladders, his blue T-shirt and plaid shorts indicating he was ready for some serious work. Only the inscription he wore on his cap revealed his mission: "a celebration of black cinema."Johnson and several other workers were busy renovating the theater formerly known as the Parkway, at the corner of North Avenue and Charles Street. As he ascended the stairs to the second level, he explained how a cadre of "family, friends and volunteers" had taken up six layers of carpet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SLOANE BROWN | August 29, 1999
She helped blaze the trail in Tinseltown for many of today's African-American actors. Dorothy Dandridge was the first black woman to be nominated for an Academy Award for best actress, for her starring role in the 1954 film "Carmen Jones." Now her life story is an HBO film. "Introducing Dorothy Dandridge" had its Baltimore premiere at the Senator Theatre, with HBO and TCI Communications of Baltimore serving as hosts of the event. Among the 800 people who packed the theater to enjoy a bit of Hollywood history, along with their popcorn, were Lisa Bryant, HBO affiliate relations director; Jean Davis, TCI Communications director; Rose Greene, executive secretary of the Baltimore Film Commission; Michael Johnson, founder of Heritage Shadows of the Silver Screen; Harriette Taylor, Baltimore City deputy comptroller; Debby Haskins, Loyola College assistant professor; Maria Broom, actress and dancer; and Gary Myers, Armani specialist at Saks Fifth Avenue.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1999
Dorothy Dandridge was an immensely talented performer who has never received her due, and maybe HBO's "Introducing Dorothy Dandridge" will change that. More power to it.It's too bad the movie, premiering tonight at 9, couldn't generate some of the same electricity Dandridge displayed both onscreen and onstage. And it's even worse that the writers couldn't make this biopic, featuring Halle Berry in a lovely but shallow performance, as exciting as it is inspirational.Dandridge, who died in 1965 at age 42 of a possibly accidental drug overdose, certainly deserves better than the footnote status she's been relegated to for years.
FEATURES
By Beth Harris | August 19, 1999
LOS ANGELES -- It was a Saturday in Cleveland, and Halle Berry tuned in the local UHF channel for the afternoon movie.The black-and-white screen sparkled with Dorothy Dandridge singing and dancing in the 1954 film "Carmen Jones," featuring an all-black cast. Berry, then 18 and living in an all-white suburb, was transfixed."Wow, everybody else in this movie is black, too, and they're talented and beautiful," she recalls thinking at the time. "This seems like a happy place. I want to go wherever they are."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 15, 1999
Jim Wheeler's Dorothy Dandridge Exhibit will make an exclusive East Coast stop in Baltimore at the Heritage Shadows of the Silver Screen Museum and Cinema starting Feb. 19."Dorothy Dandridge: The Actress, the Myth, the Sister," a collection of photographs, film costumes and memorabilia from the life of the legendary actress, will be on view at the museum through Feb. 28. Museum founder Mike Johnson also will play host to two private showings of "Porgy and Bess," the 1959 film starring Dandridge and Sidney Poitier, Feb. 19 and 20. The events will benefit the Heritage's building fund.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 21, 2000
LOS ANGELES - NBC's "The West Wing" and HBO's "Sopranos" led their networks to first and second place overall in Emmy nominations yesterday. But it was a good day, too, for Baltimore's local film industry with HBO's "The Corner," which was filmed in Baltimore, getting four prestigious nominations and finding itself competing for one of the top writing awards against "Homicide: The Movie," which was also filmed in the city last year. "We're thrilled with all the nominations, and especially happy for all the people in Baltimore connected with `The Corner,' " said Katherine Pongracz, a spokeswoman for HBO in New York.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 13, 1999
The Heritage Shadows of the Silver Screen Museum and Cinema is launching a national campaign to select the 50 greatest African-American movies and actors of the 20th century. Heritage founder Michael Johnson announced the campaign Wednesday at a luncheon at City Hall, where Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, City Council representatives Sheila Dixon, Helen Holton and Rochelle "Ricki" Spector and other dignitaries saw clips from the pending HBO movie "Introducing Dorothy Dandridge."A theatrical screening of the film next week at the Senator Theatre will officially kick off the campaign, Johnson said.
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