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NEWS
April 8, 1995
In 1984, Don Perkuchin was named manager of the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge in Dorchester County. That's dangerous assignment; they ought to give combat pay.It's not the duck hunters' errant shots you have to watch out for. It's the hunters' friends on Capitol Hill. Dorchester is a happy hunting ground for members of Congress and other influential Washingtonians.Mr. Perkuchin's sad tale has been chronicled in detail by Sun reporter Susan Baer. He no sooner arrived than he ordered his staff to begin strict law enforcement adjacent to the reserve.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
The streets around City Dock in Annapolis flooded again Friday, closing the Spa Creek Bridge connecting the Eastport neighborhood with downtown for several hours. It was yet another reminder to Lisa Craig that she's in a race against time to protect one of Maryland's oldest communities from the rising waters of the Chesapeake Bay. "We've probably doubled the number of nuisance flooding events in the past several years," said Craig, director of historic preservation for the city of Annapolis.
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NEWS
March 6, 2006
Maryland State Police were working yesterday to identify a human skeleton found in a wooded area of Dorchester County last weekend. Investigators have not been able to determine the age, sex or race of the person. The cause of death is unknown. An autopsy was performed yesterday. The remains had been in the area for an extended time, police said. Part of the skeleton was found Friday afternoon by a Department of Natural Resources employee who was checking tree growth along the 5800 block of Palmers Mill Road, north of Rhodesdale, and saw a skull.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2014
Previously sealed documents relating to the divorce case between Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman and her husband, Paul Volkman, were declared open last week, at least temporarily reversing an earlier order to shield the case from public scrutiny. In March, an Anne Arundel judge granted Neuman's request to seal the case without holding a hearing to determine if there was cause to do so, prompting objections from media organizations including The Baltimore Sun - and the decision to release documents until a hearing can be held.
NEWS
January 16, 2004
Dorchester County was selected yesterday as one of the first eight communities in the nation to be recognized by Preserve America, a program aimed at assisting historic preservation and supported by first lady Laura Bush. The tourism office of the rural Eastern Shore county drew notice for a program outlining African-American history and for developing driving and walking tours that trace the life and work of Harriet Tubman. The former slave, who was born on a farm near Cambridge, helped steer more than 300 slaves to freedom along the Underground Railroad in Dorchester County.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1999
Charles E. Edmondson, a retired judge in Dorchester County, died Saturday of cancer at his Cambridge residence. He was 84.Judge Edmondson was appointed to the Dorchester County District Court by Gov. Marvin Mandel in 1971 and served as administrative judge of the District Court for the 2nd District, which includes Wicomico, Somerset and Worcester counties.In 1975, he was appointed to the Circuit Court for Dorchester County and served until 1984, when he reached the mandatory retirement age. He was recalled by the Court of Appeals and continued to sit in District and Circuit courts past 80."
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | April 30, 1993
Four current and former Hurlock police officers have charge in a federal lawsuit that the town's police chief encouraged officers to solicit sex from women under arrest and routinely violated the civil rights of others in custody in exchange for agreements to avoid criminal charges. The suit was filed yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against the Eastern Shore town of Hurlock, Mayor Donald Bradley and Police Chief Wendell C. Travers.The suit alleges civil rights violations, saying Chief Travers fired or threatened to fire officers who refused to carry out a number of unlawful activities.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2004
CAMBRIDGE -- If state Sen. Richard F. Colburn was hoping for a consensus about whether to legalize slot machines here or anywhere else in Dorchester County, he didn't get it yesterday at a hastily called public hearing. An overflow crowd in a County Council meeting room was packed with activists sporting "No Slots" buttons who have been fighting to keep gambling out of this Choptank River community of 11,000. Equally strident was a smaller group of slots supporters who urged the county and state to get a share of gambling revenue they see leaving every day in tourist buses headed for slots emporiums in Delaware.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2005
BEULAH - Dorchester County officials are considering a plan that could make this tiny crossroads the dump site for as much as 600 tons of outside trash every day - a move that critics say would clog rural Eastern Shore roads with convoys of garbage trucks and leave an uncertain environmental legacy. The five-member County Council is reviewing bids from four unnamed companies interested in running the county's 300-acre landfill in exchange for fees paid by haulers bringing refuse from communities where landfill space is scarce.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEWART | May 24, 1992
In the early 1920s, Francis DuPont donated a parcel of land, about 65 acres, to a newly formed organization known as Cambridge Country Club. A clubhouse and nine-hole golf course were constructed and have been a part of the Eastern Shore scene for the better part of 70 years.These and other historical facts will be recalled today when a second nine holes are formally opened, giving Dorchester County its first 18-hole course. It completes a program that has been in and out of focus since the mid-1960s.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
After learning his son had been shot to death while serving a warrant at a Catonsville home, Officer Jason Schneider's father found comfort in knowing his son had died doing something that mattered. Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz recalled speaking with Schneider's father, Charles, at Maryland Shock Trauma Center shortly after Schneider was pronounced dead Aug. 28. "2013 has been a particularly difficult year for Baltimore County," Kamenetz said, speaking to officials from police and fire departments across the state who came to honor four men at the annual Fallen Heroes Day ceremony held at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens in Timonium on Friday.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2014
Harriet Tubman, the Marylander credited with leading hundreds of slaves to freedom through the Underground Railroad, was honored with a Google Doodle today. The Google search engine periodically uses an artistic interpretation of its logo, known as the Doodle, to honor famous people or commemorate holidays and events. The Tubman-inspired logo that appeared Saturday features a drawing of Tubman holding a lantern against a night sky, with the letters made to look like tree branches.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
CAMBRIDGE — This historic Eastern Shore city offers a glorious view of the Choptank River, but its working waterfront is a forlorn place. The once-thriving tuna canneries are long gone, and a failed port now sits at the mouth of Cambridge Creek, hosting occasional concerts and weddings. Cambridge officials are pushing a plan to revitalize the waterfront by redeveloping that parcel. They hope an Annapolis developer's plan for a $50 million mixed-use development will attract retirees and young professionals, as well as upscale stores and restaurants, and boost the city's long-struggling economy.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
— Oysters may or may not be an aphrodisiac, but they sure bring out passion in those who raise them for a living. Tim Devine barely knew from oysters when he was growing up in Easton, not far from the Chesapeake Bay. Now he's growing them on 10 acres of bay bottom near here that he's leased from the state, and professing to love the hard work and challenges involved in cultivating and selling his prized bivalves. "It just seemed like the stars aligned," Devine, 37, said of his transition from commercial photographer in New York City to yeoman oyster farmer.
NEWS
Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2013
The Advanced Placement data from high schools around Maryland show how great the academic divide is between the best students. Students at the highest-performing high schools - from Dulaney High in Baltimore County to Severna Park in Anne Arundel to River Hill in Howard County - are taking numerous AP classes and passing them at rates far higher than the national average. But the top students at lower-performing schools in the state had a much higher failure rate on the AP tests even when they got the same good grades in their classes.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
Recent news about climate change reveals big issues facing the Eastern Shore: a shrinking shoreline, more and bigger storms, and more salinity in our lands and farms. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the Chesapeake Bay will rise two feet by 2050. Every person in the region will be affected in some way with Dorchester County especially vulnerable with submersion of region-defining landmarks such as the Blackwater Wildlife Refuge and sites along the newly minted Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Monument.
NEWS
November 28, 1999
PROSPERITY has eluded Cambridge, a historic town of 10,800 on the Lower Eastern Shore. While nearby communities -- St. Michael's, Oxford and Easton -- draw tourists and wealthy retirees, Cambridge, the focal point of agricultural Dorchester County, limps along.Unemployment in Dorchester County, at 7.8 percent, is third-highest in the state, exceeding Baltimore's 7.4 percent jobless rate.That could change, thanks to a deal sealed this week between the state and Hyatt Hotels to turn 342 acres on the shores of the Choptank River into a luxury resort.
FEATURES
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | April 29, 2006
CAMBRIDGE -- Much of the landscape in Dorchester County is still stuck in the 19th century, back when Harriet Tubman stole away as a slave in 1849, lived as a free woman in the North then made more than a dozen returns to the area, guiding scores of family and friends to freedom. In fact, some of the back roads and swamps she traveled along seem to have been virtually untouched. And that's a good thing. Want to see what America looked like before freedom was recognized for everybody? Visit Dorchester County's Finding A Way to Freedom driving tour, a 60-mile stretch along U.S. Route 50 and State Highway 16 and a few adjoining secondary roads that chronicle Tubman's life and the routes that escaped slaves traveled to reach nearby Underground Railroad stops in adjacent Caroline County.
NEWS
June 12, 2013
Henceforth, let there by a rule that nothing can be compared to Maryland's failed investment at Rocky Gap, located just outside Cumberland in Western Maryland, except for Rocky Gap and perhaps any other $55 million white elephant loss that comes along. We know Rocky Gap. Rocky Gap is an acquaintance of ours. Sorry, Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay resort in Cambridge, but you're no Rocky Gap. Incidentally, let us insert a reminder here. Even the infamous Rocky Gap hotel and conference center isn't Rocky Gap anymore.
SPORTS
By Andrew Conrad, Baltimore Sun Media Group | May 26, 2013
Howard County players swept the two singles titles at the state tennis championships Saturday in College Park. Reservoir senior Biyik Akinshemoyin beat Wootton's Mateo Cevallos - the defending state champion - in straight sets, 6-2, 6-1, to win the boys singles title. Akinshemoyin, who lost to Cevallos after retiring due to cramping in last year's championship match, is Howard County's first boys state singles champion since Wilde Lake's David Nguyen won in 2006. "I've won some USTA tournaments before … but there's a different type of feel to high school tennis," said Akinshemoyin, who has committed to play for UMBC next year.
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