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June 15, 2006
Frank Proctor "Hunk" Doory Jr., a liquor salesman and sports fan, died of liver cancer Saturday at his home in the Ridgely Condominiums in Towson. He was 82. Mr. Doory was born in Baltimore and raised on North Port Street. He was a 1938 graduate of Polytechnic Institute, where he competed in varsity football, basketball, and track and field. He also was active in sports at the University of Maryland, College Park, earning his bachelor's degree in business in 1942. "At the University of Maryland, he was a four-letter man. He played varsity football, basketball, baseball and boxed.
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NEWS
By Justin George and Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
A Baltimore woman received a 40-year prison sentence Monday in the death of her 1-year-old grandson and abuse of her granddaughter after a judge said she rubbed methadone onto the children's gums before she put them to bed and headed off to a party. Towanda Reaves, 51, took responsibility for the boy's death but said she never meant to kill him. "This is not the intentional killing of her grandson, but those who think this was some form of tragic accident misunderstand the case, and misunderstand the jury's analysis of it," said Baltimore Circuit Judge Timothy Doory.
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NEWS
By Staff Report | August 17, 1993
One of Baltimore's top violent-crimes prosecutors will handle the cases against the two teen-agers accused of killing a Westminster couple last month, a defense attorney in the case said yesterday.Although not yet officially entered into the cases against Jason Aaron DeLong, 19, of Westminster and Sara E. Citroni, 17, of Reisterstown, Baltimore Assistant State's Attorney Timothy J. Doory is expected to be appointed prosecutor within a week or so, said Baltimore defense attorney Luther C. West.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
A judge has agreed to downgrade the misconduct convictions of two former Baltimore police officers accused of picking up a pair of teenagers and leaving them far from home. The judge's decision to grant probation before judgment opens the way for Milton Smith and Tyrone Francis to wipe their records clean. The detectives were convicted in 2011, after the first trial personally handled by State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein. The officers were acquitted on more serious kidnapping charges and given suspended prison sentences, probation and community service.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1995
A 28-year-old Baltimore man was committed to a mental institution yesterday after admitting he used a saw to decapitate the matriarch of a local Gypsy family last fall because he thought her to be "a demon."Douglas Thomas Clark's voice was barely audible as he pleaded guilty but not criminally responsible to first-degree murder in the slaying of Deborah Stevens, an East Baltimore fortune-teller known as Sister Myra, and to carrying a deadly weapon with the intent of harming her.Baltimore City Circuit Judge Clifton J. Gordy Jr. accepted the pleas and committed Clark indefinitely to the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, which will determine if he can ever be released.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | February 25, 1993
While authorities wonder whether 8-year-old Timothy A. Washington Jr. is still alive, the man accused of abducting the East Baltimore boy five months ago was freed yesterday.Keith Garrett pleaded guilty to one count of misdemeanor extortion and received a suspended 18-month sentence in Baltimore Circuit Court. He had been charged with kidnapping the boy and demanding that his ex-girlfriend, who is Timothy's mother, swap their 4-year-old daughter for the boy.Mr. Garrett, 22, was arrested in October and had been held in lieu of bail at the Baltimore City Detention Center.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1997
Baltimore City Councilwoman Joan Carter Conway was unanimously elected last night by the 43rd District Democratic Central Committee to replace state Sen. John A. Pica Jr., who resigned last week.The five-member committee picked Conway over state Del. Ann Marie Doory, who has represented the district in the House of Delegates since 1986. A third candidate, Dr. Charles E. Wiles III, a surgeon who lives in Homeland, withdrew before the vote and threw his support to Doory."I am humbled and honored to be chosen to serve the constituents of the 43rd legislative district," an emotional Conway said after the vote.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | March 4, 1993
Citing a lack of evidence, prosecutors dropped a murder charge yesterday against a convicted sex offender held since December in the stabbing death of an 11-year-old West Baltimore boy.Warren C. Berry, 30, remains a suspect in the investigation into the death of Michael Shawn Gasque -- and subject to arrest if additional evidence surfaces -- prosecutor Timothy J. Doory said after a preliminary hearing in Baltimore District Court. The boy's body was found Dec. 18 in an abandoned shed in a wooded area near his home in Edmondson Village.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2011
Two Baltimore police officers convicted of misconduct for stranding two 15-year-old boys far from their homes received 18-month suspended jail terms and probation Wednesday, with a judge refusing prosecutors' request to strip them of their badges. Detectives Tyrone Francis and Milton Smith asserted their innocence before Baltimore Circuit Judge Timothy J. Doory handed down the sentence. "I still believe the only thing I'm actually guilty of is doing my job," Smith said. The father of one of the victims had asked that Doory send the men to jail.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | November 9, 1993
Sister MaryAnn Glinka's duties at the Franciscan nun's convent in Baltimore included monitoring the motherhouse's security system. Early on March 19, hearing the alarm triggered once again by the damaged door to the convent's library, she called the security agency to report a false alarm.Minutes later, on her way to check on the door, she was strangled and raped.Prosecutors gave that account of the final moments of the 50-year-old nun's life yesterday during the first day of the trial of her accused killer, Melvin L. Jones, who is charged with first-degree murder.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2011
Two Baltimore police officers convicted of misconduct for stranding two 15-year-old boys far from their homes received 18-month suspended jail terms and probation Wednesday, with a judge refusing prosecutors' request to strip them of their badges. Detectives Tyrone Francis and Milton Smith asserted their innocence before Baltimore Circuit Judge Timothy J. Doory handed down the sentence. "I still believe the only thing I'm actually guilty of is doing my job," Smith said. The father of one of the victims had asked that Doory send the men to jail.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2011
A city jury found two city police officers guilty of misconduct Monday but cleared them of kidnapping charges in the first case tried by Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein. After nearly two weeks of testimony, jurors took about three hours to reach the verdict. Detectives Tyrone S. Francis and Milton Smith III were convicted of two counts each of misconduct — a misdemeanor — for picking up two 15-year-olds from West Baltimore in May 2009 and leaving them stranded far from their homes.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,melissa.harris@baltsun.com | January 24, 2009
Vernice Harris, the Baltimore woman convicted of manslaughter after her 2-year-old daughter died of methadone poisoning, was sentenced yesterday to 10 years in prison for failing the drug treatment program that was required for probation. The sentence was the maximum possible. During a contentious hearing before Baltimore Circuit Judge Timothy Doory, Harris' attorney, Maureen Rowland, argued that her client deserved a second chance and that her infractions - writing love notes to a male patient - hardly warranted dismissing her from Second Genesis, a residential treatment program in Crownsville.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | August 16, 2008
A woman convicted of manslaughter in the methadone poisoning death of her toddler was sentenced yesterday to a mental health facility after waiting four months for an available bed. Vernice Harris, 31, is expected to be transferred from the Baltimore Women's Detention Center to Second Genesis, a drug and alcohol treatment center, on Sept. 8, according to prosecutors. Harris has been in jail since January, when she was charged in the death of her 2-year-old daughter, Bryanna, who overdosed on methadone.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun Reporter | August 9, 2008
Defense attorney Leslie Stein gripped both sides of the witness stand on Thursday as he forcefully rebutted allegations that he had tried to coerce a witness in a murder trial to change his testimony. "Of course not!" he exclaimed when Assistant State's Attorney Kevin Wiggins asked Stein whether he'd called witness Christopher Meadows a snitch and threatened him and his family. "Did you tell the witness to lie?" Wiggins asked Stein. Stein threw his hands in the air. "For this case? Why?"
NEWS
June 15, 2006
Frank Proctor "Hunk" Doory Jr., a liquor salesman and sports fan, died of liver cancer Saturday at his home in the Ridgely Condominiums in Towson. He was 82. Mr. Doory was born in Baltimore and raised on North Port Street. He was a 1938 graduate of Polytechnic Institute, where he competed in varsity football, basketball, and track and field. He also was active in sports at the University of Maryland, College Park, earning his bachelor's degree in business in 1942. "At the University of Maryland, he was a four-letter man. He played varsity football, basketball, baseball and boxed.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1995
Baltimore prosecutors dropped murder charges yesterday dating back 26 years against a Reservoir Hill man because they can't find any witnesses.Herman M. Henderson, formerly known as Mack D. Thomas, was charged in the 1969 fatal shooting of a reputed city drug lord in the 1000 block of Pennsylvania Ave. His original case had been placed on the inactive docket in 1970 because no witnesses were available, according to a docket sheet.In the meantime, the defendant changed his name from Thomas to Henderson and believed the charges against him in the fatal shooting of Clarence "Egypt" Jones, 45, had been dropped.
NEWS
March 16, 1996
Robert L. Doory Sr., 76, Martin Marietta analystRobert L. Doory Sr., a retired financial analyst for Martin Marietta Corp. who was active in his church, died of cancer Wednesday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 76.Mr. Doory went to work in 1938 in Middle River for what was then the Glenn L. Martin Co. and retired in 1985. He was a member of the Martin Marietta retirees' association.Mr. Doory, a longtime Northwood resident, was an usher and former president of the Holy Name Society at St. Matthew Roman Catholic Church.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2003
A Baltimore man was sentenced to life in prison plus 30 years yesterday for shooting five people, including three children, as he tried to settle a drug score last year. Mark Canty, 31, was convicted in May of five counts of attempted murder and several firearms charges. None of the children was seriously injured, but Judge Timothy J. Doory said it was irrelevant that they were merely grazed by bullets. "You get no credit for lack of aim," Doory said in city Circuit Court. The incident happened July 19 last year when Canty ran into a crowd of people in the 1500 block of Baker St. and fired his .357 handgun several times.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2003
Evoking memories of the loss of the Baltimore Colts, Mayor Martin O'Malley and Comptroller William Donald Schaefer urged lawmakers yesterday to pass legislation to ensure the Preakness remains in Baltimore. O'Malley and Schaefer appeared together to back a bill that would require the owner of Pimlico Race Course to transfer ownership rights to the Preakness trademark to the state as a condition of receiving a license to operate slot machines at the track. Under the legislation, sponsored by Del. Ann Marie Doory, the track owners would continue to have the right to use and profit from the Preakness name.
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