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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
The city liquor board suspended yesterday the liquor license of the Circus Bar on Baltimore's notorious Block because of narcotics violations.The Board of Liquor License Commissioners ordered Shelley and Jules Gordon, the owners of the Circus Bar in the 400 block of E. Baltimore St., to sell the establishment's liquor license in 90 days.The Gordons may keep their adult entertainment license and remain in business.But they may not sell liquor, effectively immediately, the board said.The board's action came after more than a year of police surveillance during which videotapes were compiled showing the Circus Bar's former doorman, Harry Miller, engaged in several sales of cocaine.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Alice Fallon Yeskey | March 15, 2013
In which we watch everything start to unravel. Adam and Natalia's relationship is going swimmingly. They have a lovely, tender first first-time-in-the-bedroom conversation wherein they are open and communicative and sweet. “I like how clear you are with me,” he says as they kiss. Her reply: “What other way is there?” Hannah, meanwhile, is still in the throes of her severe OCD relapse. It's not clear whether she's taking her meds or not, but from all appearances she's no better than she looked last week.
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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 4, 1997
Before that night at the movie theater, when a doorman motioned him and a friend out of a long line of white people to check their tickets, Araman Adams had never felt singled out for being black. He says he'd never felt even the light hand of subtle discrimination. He's 18 years old, from the inner city of Baltimore, a young man who has been mentored through some rough times by a group of caring adults, mostly white. His experience at the movie theater was embarrassing and infuriating. But it also marked a significant moment of maturity in his life.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | November 2, 2008
When I was about 5, I overheard my grandmother telling my mother that "the coloreds" were moving into Baldwin, Long Island, and that a lot of her neighbors were talking about selling their homes. She used that hushed, conspiratorial tone that naturally puts all children within earshot on aural alert. "Some of them just bought a house a block over," she reported. "But they are the loveliest people!" At the time, I was known as "Big Ears" for my ability to home in on anything even mildly controversial, and, more irritating, to repeat it to anyone who expressed the slightest interest.
NEWS
By SAM ROBERTS and SAM ROBERTS,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 2006
NEW YORK -- The threatened walkout by apartment building employees last week prompted a million or so New Yorkers to contemplate the value of an everyday amenity they take for granted: the doorman. As it turns out, the question of a doorman's dispensability was officially answered by the government six decades ago. During World War II, when some landlords wanted to save money by dismissing doormen altogether - but without reducing rents - federal officials defined when a doorman is essential, at least in wartime.
NEWS
By Michael James | February 20, 1991
Ellicott City is a long way from New Delhi, India, but for a restaurant entrepreneur, the dollar is worth the trip."When I came here,I saw right away that America likes its casual places where people can go for a sundae or a sandwich," said A. J. Datta, the owner of thenewly opened AJ's Deli-n-Ice Cream on St. John's Lane."
NEWS
By JANET HELLER | April 19, 1991
It is no fun being mistaken for a baglady in Manhattan. Thenext time I visit the city I shall borrow a fur coat, wear simulated gold in my ears and carry nothing but a purse. It is better to be mistaken for a woman of affluence.I arrived in the Big Apple wearing a vintage down coat that made me look like a bulky Muscovite, woolen stockings for warmth, and Nikes. If women working in corporate offices can wear Nikes, I reasoned, why not a visitor from Maryland? Of course, professionals in skirts hurrying along city streets usually clutch expensive leather attache cases, and their intense expressions speak of high-powered mergers and acquisitions.
NEWS
By Staff report | July 24, 1992
An Edgewater man who fell into a shop window and cut his shoulder during a scuffle with Annapolis police last week has filed a brutality complaint.Chauncey S. Smith, 31, of Mills Farm Road, has accused two city officers of using excessive force in arresting him, police officials said. Although Mr. Smith is black and the officers are white, his complaint does not accuse them of racial harassment, police said.He could not be reached for comment yesterday.Mr. Smith was arrested the night of July 16 after he and three friends began shouting profanities when they were refused entry to Armadillo's, a downtown pub and restaurant, witnesses and police said.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun Columnist | November 28, 2006
The holidays are a time to remember those who make your life easier and more enjoyable. No, not your family. I'm talking about the people who do routine tasks like cutting your hair, walking your dog or delivering the mail and newspaper. Often we express thanks with a holiday tip. But that raises lots of questions. Which service providers should be tipped? How much? If you tip someone one year, must you do so every year? Will a tip guarantee good service? What if you don't tip? It's enough to raise your holiday stress level another notch or two. "At its best, tipping is appreciation and gratitude in the form of cash.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | November 2, 2008
When I was about 5, I overheard my grandmother telling my mother that "the coloreds" were moving into Baldwin, Long Island, and that a lot of her neighbors were talking about selling their homes. She used that hushed, conspiratorial tone that naturally puts all children within earshot on aural alert. "Some of them just bought a house a block over," she reported. "But they are the loveliest people!" At the time, I was known as "Big Ears" for my ability to home in on anything even mildly controversial, and, more irritating, to repeat it to anyone who expressed the slightest interest.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun Columnist | November 28, 2006
The holidays are a time to remember those who make your life easier and more enjoyable. No, not your family. I'm talking about the people who do routine tasks like cutting your hair, walking your dog or delivering the mail and newspaper. Often we express thanks with a holiday tip. But that raises lots of questions. Which service providers should be tipped? How much? If you tip someone one year, must you do so every year? Will a tip guarantee good service? What if you don't tip? It's enough to raise your holiday stress level another notch or two. "At its best, tipping is appreciation and gratitude in the form of cash.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN REPORTER | May 14, 2006
THAT GIRL: SEASON ONE / / Shout! Factory / / $39.98 Before Mary Richards, Murphy Brown or Carrie Bradshaw, there was Ann Marie. And 40 years after her debut on ABC, prime time's first independent woman is back in a delightful time warp of a five-DVD set that takes one straight back to the exuberance, promise and energy of being young in the go-go 1960s. Marlo Thomas stars as the wannabe actress who moves out of her parents' home in Brewster, N.Y., to take up single life in Manhattan -- a move that was revolutionary for a young female character on network TV at the time.
NEWS
By SAM ROBERTS and SAM ROBERTS,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 2006
NEW YORK -- The threatened walkout by apartment building employees last week prompted a million or so New Yorkers to contemplate the value of an everyday amenity they take for granted: the doorman. As it turns out, the question of a doorman's dispensability was officially answered by the government six decades ago. During World War II, when some landlords wanted to save money by dismissing doormen altogether - but without reducing rents - federal officials defined when a doorman is essential, at least in wartime.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2000
An exotic nightclub dancer pleaded guilty yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court to solicitation of murder in a plot to kill a former boyfriend so she could collect on his $300,000 life insurance policy. A doorman at the club where she danced - the Wagon Wheel in the 800 block of North Point Road in East Baltimore - and his son both pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit murder in the case. Under a plea agreement, prosecutors will recommend at her sentencing early next year a seven-year prison term for the dancer, Rosemary Acfalle Cing, 32, of the 2300 block of Holyoke Road in Rosedale.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
The city liquor board suspended yesterday the liquor license of the Circus Bar on Baltimore's notorious Block because of narcotics violations.The Board of Liquor License Commissioners ordered Shelley and Jules Gordon, the owners of the Circus Bar in the 400 block of E. Baltimore St., to sell the establishment's liquor license in 90 days.The Gordons may keep their adult entertainment license and remain in business.But they may not sell liquor, effectively immediately, the board said.The board's action came after more than a year of police surveillance during which videotapes were compiled showing the Circus Bar's former doorman, Harry Miller, engaged in several sales of cocaine.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 4, 1997
Before that night at the movie theater, when a doorman motioned him and a friend out of a long line of white people to check their tickets, Araman Adams had never felt singled out for being black. He says he'd never felt even the light hand of subtle discrimination. He's 18 years old, from the inner city of Baltimore, a young man who has been mentored through some rough times by a group of caring adults, mostly white. His experience at the movie theater was embarrassing and infuriating. But it also marked a significant moment of maturity in his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Alice Fallon Yeskey | March 15, 2013
In which we watch everything start to unravel. Adam and Natalia's relationship is going swimmingly. They have a lovely, tender first first-time-in-the-bedroom conversation wherein they are open and communicative and sweet. “I like how clear you are with me,” he says as they kiss. Her reply: “What other way is there?” Hannah, meanwhile, is still in the throes of her severe OCD relapse. It's not clear whether she's taking her meds or not, but from all appearances she's no better than she looked last week.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN REPORTER | May 14, 2006
THAT GIRL: SEASON ONE / / Shout! Factory / / $39.98 Before Mary Richards, Murphy Brown or Carrie Bradshaw, there was Ann Marie. And 40 years after her debut on ABC, prime time's first independent woman is back in a delightful time warp of a five-DVD set that takes one straight back to the exuberance, promise and energy of being young in the go-go 1960s. Marlo Thomas stars as the wannabe actress who moves out of her parents' home in Brewster, N.Y., to take up single life in Manhattan -- a move that was revolutionary for a young female character on network TV at the time.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | September 13, 1992
If you wanted to dedicate a song to Christos Dardamanis to commemorate his longtime proprietorship of Club Stabile's, you could pick Willie Nelson's "Night Life" to mark the hours he has spent at the landmark country music nightspot in Highlandtown.Or, better yet, you could choose the Oak Ridge Boys' "Y'All Come Back Saloon" in recognition of the crowds he has attracted to the bar at 3919 Eastern Ave. year after year with live music and a friendly atmosphere.After 27 1/2 years, Mr. Dardamanis is selling the place rightfully billed as "Baltimore's home of country music."
NEWS
By Staff report | July 24, 1992
An Edgewater man who fell into a shop window and cut his shoulder during a scuffle with Annapolis police last week has filed a brutality complaint.Chauncey S. Smith, 31, of Mills Farm Road, has accused two city officers of using excessive force in arresting him, police officials said. Although Mr. Smith is black and the officers are white, his complaint does not accuse them of racial harassment, police said.He could not be reached for comment yesterday.Mr. Smith was arrested the night of July 16 after he and three friends began shouting profanities when they were refused entry to Armadillo's, a downtown pub and restaurant, witnesses and police said.
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