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By ROB KASPER | December 31, 2005
Late in the year, journalists like to weigh in on the big national and international stories of the past 12 months. Not me. I will leave it to others in my craft to analyze whether the powers that be should have been tapping phones, opening the wilderness up to oil exploration or getting more seasoned slingers on the mound at Camden Yards. I'll concentrate on what happened on the home front. For me, 2005 will be remembered as the year we lived with a dormant doorbell. The doorbell went into a quiescent state, along with other conveniences in our lives, around mid-May.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
A 26-year-old man was shot and killed outside his Gardenville home late Sunday night, city police said. Adam Robinson of the 4100 block of Idaho Avenue, near Belair Road, answered his door bell about 11 p.m., police said. He walked outside and was shot multiple times. He was pronounced dead at Johns Hopkins Hospital about 11:30 p.m., police said. Police have no suspects at this time and are continuing to investigate. Mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com
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NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 14, 1992
Letters, calls and the roar of the crowd:Arthur Murphy, president, Baltimore branch, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People: Where can I buy one of those doorbells you wrote about? The ones that play the different tunes? I believe the idea was taken from an old Bill Cosby album.When I read your column, I dug out the album. It was from thelate Sixties or early Seventies. Cosby does this routine about making a doorbell that can say "Who is at the door?" or play Beethoven.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2009
Imagine your doorbell rings and, to your surprise, it's a colorful school of 1,500 tropical fish. Actually, they wouldn't even bother to ring your doorbell - they would just stream in through your open windows and swirl around, staring at you while you're eating breakfast. or taking a shower or writing an absurd column on a home fish invasion. It would be alarming, to say the least. Their uninvited presence would seem intrusive, unnatural. This is because fish don't really belong in our world, just as I have concluded that I don't really belong in theirs.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 9, 1992
I am not a jealous person.Or rather I have never found anyone to be jealous of.When I see a person richer than me, I simply say: He's probably miserable and has ulcers and will end up in prison for tax fraud.When I see a person better looking than me, I simply say: He's probably got three ex-wives and the alimony is killing him.And when I see a person smarter than me . . . well, that has never happened.Ego is a great defense against jealousy. If you feel you are better than everyone else, how can you possibly be jealous of anyone else?
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | April 20, 1992
An ex-convict charged in the December killing of a 13-year-old boy who had taunted the man's father by repeatedly ringing his doorbell was arrested by police yesterday evening in Southwest Baltimore.Homicide detectives arrested William Cecil Brandon Jr., 49, about 6 p.m. on a corner in the 600 block of Poplar Grove St.Police said the man, who had changed his appearance by growing a beard, apparently was living on the street, only 15 blocks from his father's home, where the slaying occurred.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | December 15, 1991
Mournful wails filled the big, wood-beamed funeral chapel on East North Avenue, cries of pain and sobs of bewilderment: After 13 short years on Earth, Moe was going home.Ruben "Moe" Lawson Jr. was shot to death a week ago. He was with a group of kids who were ringing a West Baltimore doorbell to agitate an elderly man.Moe Lawson's alleged killer, identified by police as the elderly man's son, was still at large yesterday as the boy's body lay in its lace-draped white coffin, a Christmas wreath on one side.
NEWS
April 29, 1994
A man punched a Glen Burnie woman in the face after she answered her doorbell Sunday morning, county police said.Bernadette Linton, who lives on Leisure Lane, opened her door shortly before 2:30 a.m. and was hit once in the face by a man who said: "This is for Gerry," according to policeMs. Linton told police the blow nearly knocked her out. She also said she didn't get a good look at the man or the woman with him. She had never seen either of the suspects before, police said. The pair ran off after the assault.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg | December 31, 1991
In the hours after he allegedly shot and killed a 13-year-old youth he suspected of ringing his father's doorbell, William C. Brandon Jr. almost ended up in handcuffs, but police got to his house a few moments too late.Since that day three weeks ago, Brandon, 48, has eluded city police and the FBI. Charged with first-degree murder for the Dec. 8 slaying of Rubin Lawson, he was last seen leaving the scene of the West Baltimore murder.Police believe they just missed him as he left his home in the 600 block of Brice Street.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
A 26-year-old man was shot and killed outside his Gardenville home late Sunday night, city police said. Adam Robinson of the 4100 block of Idaho Avenue, near Belair Road, answered his door bell about 11 p.m., police said. He walked outside and was shot multiple times. He was pronounced dead at Johns Hopkins Hospital about 11:30 p.m., police said. Police have no suspects at this time and are continuing to investigate. Mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | September 24, 2007
Years ago, some management genius decided that the best way to improve production in an office setting was to wall off employees in drab gray cubicles. Apparently, the theory was this: Lonely, isolated, with nothing more stimulating to look at than the occasional bowling trophy or Chinese takeout menu tacked to a wall, the employees would better concentrate on their jobs and provide more value to the company - if they didn't blow their brains out from boredom. Yet the Cubicle Culture also ushered in another big, fat, straight-out-of-Dilbert headache: co-workers who appeared in your cubicle without warning and startled the hell out of you. Now, one far-thinking young man has done something about that.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | December 31, 2005
Late in the year, journalists like to weigh in on the big national and international stories of the past 12 months. Not me. I will leave it to others in my craft to analyze whether the powers that be should have been tapping phones, opening the wilderness up to oil exploration or getting more seasoned slingers on the mound at Camden Yards. I'll concentrate on what happened on the home front. For me, 2005 will be remembered as the year we lived with a dormant doorbell. The doorbell went into a quiescent state, along with other conveniences in our lives, around mid-May.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | January 1, 2005
FOR THE PAST three weeks I've been wandering all over town, from the most proper addresses to the old downtown streets at hours when the drunks are being thrown out of the bars. Along the way I've observed what Baltimore has done to itself over the past year. I've gained weight from all the parties, sometimes I've been weary, but I still delight in an invitation to an open door and a place to talk. The extended holiday season is my idea of a good time; when friends told me they were leaving Baltimore to celebrate New Year's at Rehoboth Beach, I thought to myself, you've got to be kidding.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2004
City police identified yesterday two men killed Monday in separate shootings as a 21-year-old and 33-year-old M-y deaths that pushed the citys homicide total this month to 18. In the first killing, Michael Campbell, 21, of the 1300 block of Spelman Road was driving his GMC sport utility vehicle about 11 a.m. in the 2700 block of Giles Road. when someone approached and fired six to seven shots into the truck, police said. Campbell, 21, was shot in the head, chest and arm, police said. He died at the scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | March 16, 2003
At the start of The Legacies of Western Maryland College, by K. Douglas Beakes (Gateway, 183 pages, $5), is a photo of the author. How proudly he smiles, this being his third book so far about alma mater? Not on your tintype. He glowers. Beakes, a small-town boy, entered Western Maryland College in 1942, went off to war, and graduated in 1948. Today, his mind is a movie screen for rerun after rerun of student days and nights. But, since last May 20's name change ("a modern-day academic tragedy")
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1996
Jewel and John Verde have gotten used to bright lights flashing behind their Gambrills home and buzzing sounds coming from the bathroom. It's only their son, John Jr., perfecting one of his inventions.The 16-year-old Arundel High School junior's knack for fiddling has paid off.John won third place and a $1,000 savings bond in a contest sponsored by Duracell, the battery company, and the National Science Teachers Association for an invention that pages people to let them know someone is at the door.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | April 20, 1992
A 49-year-old man who eluded police for four months has been arrested by police in West Baltimore on charges of killing a teen-ager after the youth and others annoyingly rang the man's father's doorbell.Authorities thought that William Cecil Brandon Jr. had left the state, but they didn't know where he had gone. The television show "America's Most Wanted" planned to profile the case in May.But yesterday, homicide detectives discovered that Mr. Brandon had returned to the city and was living on a street corner just 15 blocks from where Rubin "Moe" Lawson, 13, was shot.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Evening Sun Staff | August 7, 1991
ONE MORNING before work, Lisa jogged up to her target's house, dog leash in hand, and rang the doorbell. Had anyone there seen her golden retriever? she inquired breathlessly of the man who opened the door. As she described the dog, the man shook his head regretfully.2 "TV PIs never write reports," Sherry observes.@
NEWS
April 29, 1994
A man punched a Glen Burnie woman in the face after she answered her doorbell Sunday morning, county police said.Bernadette Linton, who lives on Leisure Lane, opened her door shortly before 2:30 a.m. and was hit once in the face by a man who said: "This is for Gerry," according to policeMs. Linton told police the blow nearly knocked her out. She also said she didn't get a good look at the man or the woman with him. She had never seen either of the suspects before, police said. The pair ran off after the assault.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 14, 1992
Letters, calls and the roar of the crowd:Arthur Murphy, president, Baltimore branch, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People: Where can I buy one of those doorbells you wrote about? The ones that play the different tunes? I believe the idea was taken from an old Bill Cosby album.When I read your column, I dug out the album. It was from thelate Sixties or early Seventies. Cosby does this routine about making a doorbell that can say "Who is at the door?" or play Beethoven.
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