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Door To Door

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NEWS
March 3, 2004
Harry Shifren, a retired installment salesman, died at Northwest Hospital Center Feb. 25 of complications from surgery after a fall earlier in the month. The Pikesville resident was 90. Mr. Shifren was born in Baltimore and raised on Oswego Avenue, where his father operated the Oswego Tailor Shop. He was a 1931 graduate of City College, where he played baseball and ran track. "He used to pick up Al Capone's laundry when he was living in Baltimore in the 1930s," said a grandson, Michael Paskoff of Towson.
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SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | March 27, 2013
Randy Edsall is a football coach, not a marketing guy, but he's got the lingo down. Ask him why the Maryland football team is practicing Saturday at Dunbar, and he says it's all about growing the Terps brand in this area and throughout the rest of the state, too. "What we need to do is make sure we're going out and meeting the people and being visible in the Baltimore community, rather than expecting people to come to us," he says....
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NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | May 14, 1994
Door-to-door selling isn't what it used to be, even for the companies that still do it.Peter Black, director of sales and marketing for Electrolux, acknowledges the decline in door-to-door business but says Electrolux will stay on the street because that's still what works best.Even so, the Electrolux door-to-door sales force has dropped from 40,000 at its peak in the 1940s to about 10,000 today."Times and people change," he said. "They don't want the hard work and the discipline. People can't handle the strain on their ego."
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | January 10, 2013
The Better Business Bureau of Greater Maryland is warning that Commerce Energy representatives are using "strong-arm tactics" when going door-to-door selling residential electric services in some neighborhoods. "According to complaints, sales representatives visit the same house repeatedly even after being asked to leave, not solicit, not come back or even when told the resident is ill," the BBB said Thursday in a release. The group suggests consumers screen solicitors at their front doors.
NEWS
By Staff report | March 17, 1991
but not younger pupils -- will be allowed to sell goods door to doorfor school fund-raisers, under the county's first formal fund-raising policy.The policy adopted by the school board Thursday reflected many changes sought by parents and students who spoke at a public hearing last month, including the abandonment of a proposed ban on alldoor-to-door sales.The ban, presented by the committee that drafted the policy as a safety issue, met general agreement for elementary school students. But speakers at the public hearing protested that parents should set safety rules for middle and high school students.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | October 21, 1994
After losing a run for the state Senate four years ago, John Leopold wants to return to his old political stomping grounds representing District 31 in the House of Delegates.But to do that, Mr. Leopold must place at least third in a race that includes three Democratic incumbents who won almost 70 percent of the vote in their primary and two younger Republicans.Incumbents Joan Cadden, W. Ray Huff and C. Stokes Kolodziejski, who are expected to do well in this strongly Democratic district, will face off against Mr. Leopold and Republican candidates Doug Arnold, a 26-year-old employee of the Clerk of the Court, and Victoria Schade, 23, a legislative assistant in Annapolis.
NEWS
December 11, 1999
Baltimore police are searching for a woman who went door-to-door this week posing as a police officer asking for donations to the Police Athletic League.Police said the woman, described as between 23 and 30 years old, thin and about 5 feet 4 inches tall, collected money Wednesday from residents in the Cedonia area of Northeast Baltimore.She wore a navy blue uniform sweater and pants with oxford shoes, and was well-mannered and neatly groomed.The Police Athletic League does not solicit donations door-to-door.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1999
The NAACP is going door-to-door this month in a bid to boost its national membership by reminding Americans of all races what the organization is doing and how new members can get involved.Although the NAACP's leadership is strong and its finances stable, organization officials have struggled to boost national membership in recent years. To address the problem, it hired its first membership consultant this summer.The Knock Across America campaign asks each member of the Baltimore-based National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to knock on at least 10 doors to tell friends and neighbors about the organization.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | May 14, 1994
The vacuum cleaner business must be booming in Essex, because Big Mike McCarthy is getting the same answer at almost every house."Just bought a new one last week," a smiling woman says through a screen door.Big Mike fended off the rejection politely and gave it one more shot, handing the woman a tiny plastic bag of wood chips."If you just walk around and agree with everyone, you'll never get in," he said over his shoulder."This is a free gift from me," he said in a fast mumble. "Just scatter them on the rug and vacuum them up. Makes the room smell nice.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 13, 2002
It is hard to imagine a much better cast for a television movie than the one in TNT cable's Door to Door: William H. Macy (Fargo), Helen Mirren (Prime Suspect), Kathy Baker (Picket Fences) and Kyra Sedgwick (Something to Talk About). And each of them is performing near the top of their acting games - especially Macy. And, yet, the most impressive thing about this lovely and moving film about a man who transcended the physical limitations of cerebral palsy to become a successful door-to-door salesman is not the acting, but rather the writing.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2010
Maryland residents who have not mailed their census forms will be visited by one of the roughly 12,000 census takers who began door-to-door surveying this weekend. Through July 10, the Census Bureau will attempt to conduct the 10-question surveys in person with the estimated 26 percent of Marylanders who did not send back their census forms by the April 16 deadline. The in-person interviews are part of the federally mandated 2010 census count. Census takers began canvassing the state on Saturday, with about 2,500 being deployed to Baltimore City, said Sylvia Ballinger, media specialist for the Census Bureau.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2010
A Milwaukee man was charged with second-degree assault and sex offense charges after Anne Arundel County Police say he sexually assaulted a woman in her Arnold home Wednesday afternoon. Officers responded to the 500 block of Norton Way at about 2:41 p.m. when the woman called police to report she had been assaulted. She told police that a man selling magazine subscriptions asked to use her bathroom and he assaulted her afterward. Police officers in the area arrested a man in the area matching the victim's description of the suspect.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | July 17, 2009
Consumer affairs officials are warning Howard County residents about a water quality sales scam being pushed by door-to-door promoters. Rebecca Bowman of the county's Consumer Affairs Office said residents have been finding notices on their doors offering free water testing. Those who accept and leave a water sample and completed questionnaire are later told that the test revealed the need for purification equipment, which the person then tries to sell them. The name of a testing company is not provided.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | September 21, 2008
Virginia Lloyd had often paid for catalog purchases with a check. But Lloyd, 82, a Columbia resident, learned along with a handful of other senior citizens last week that using credit cards is the safest way to make such purchases. "It's just simpler," Lloyd said on why she uses checks. The seniors met Tuesday for discussion about personal and shopping safety at Oakland Manor in Columbia. The event was presented by the county's Office of Consumer Affairs and the Police Department. Topics ran the gamut, from which method of payment to use when making purchases to stores' return policies.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON | June 29, 2008
The late Robert H. Kittleman, a Howard County Republican who served for more than two decades in the Maryland General Assembly, always said the surest way to elective success is to knock on 10,000 doors and impress voters within the first 30 seconds that you are intelligent enough to do the job and affable enough to be approachable. Democrat Shane Pendergrass has spent 22 years in elective office, the past 14 as a member of the House of Delegates, yet she doesn't like knocking on doors, and doesn't do much of it, though she doesn't dispute the Kittleman credo.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | May 11, 2008
Havre de Grace voters returned two experienced politicians to the City Council and selected a newcomer, all to serve two-year terms. A self-described "new face for Havre de Grace," Bill Martin, a 34-year-old teacher at Aberdeen Middle School, was elected to the council after weeks of going door to door to about 250 houses, introducing himself to the city's voters. After learning of the results Tuesday, Martin declared, "I love democracy." He credited his success to old-fashioned campaigning.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 18, 2002
WASHINGTON - People have the right to go door to door to advocate for religious, political or other noncommercial causes without first getting the government's permission, the Supreme Court ruled yesterday in a lopsided constitutional victory for the ministry of the Jehovah's Witnesses. The 8-1 decision struck down a small Ohio town's ordinance that made it a crime for any "canvasser" or "solicitor" to pay an uninvited visit on any of the 278 residents for the purpose of promoting or explaining any "cause" without providing identification and obtaining a permit from the mayor's office.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1997
Adults in strange costumes escorting their inner child from door to door! Relationships ripped apart at the seams like an overstuffed bag of candy!Today, on Halloween eve, we examine twentysomething trick-or-treaters: Are they aging sociopaths desperately trying to cling to their childhoods, costumed candy addicts or frighteningly free spirits?Join us as we study this little-known disorder.A case studyJennifer Koerner is an otherwise normal 23-year-old assistant for marketing at Towson University.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz | August 25, 2007
Sykesville police are warning residents about door-to-door solicitors, primarily magazine salesmen working for a Texas company, who have been the subject of several complaints and who are working in the area without proper permits. Cpl. Dave Lewis said at least one incident of unwanted touching of a woman by a male solicitor has been reported. "It has been our experience that all of the sales persons are from out of state and almost all have criminal records," Lewis said in a news release.
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