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Doomsday Budget

NEWS
April 13, 2012
Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller should promptly step down following his outrageous, irresponsible, unprofessional, petulant, self-centered performance during the final days and hours of the just-completed 90-day session of the General Assembly ("Debacle in Annapolis," April 11). He purposely sabotaged the budget compromise for his personal campaign to expand gambling to a sixth site in Maryland. Senator Miller's arrogance and egotism are breathtaking. Mr. Miller then has the audacity to suggest yet another, special session of the General Assembly at an additional cost of $21,000 to $100,000 per day to the already-overburdened Maryland taxpayers.
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EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | April 12, 2012
When better than on Friday the 13th to lampoon Doomsday, or more specifically Maryland's so-called Doomsday Budget. First target: A special session of the Maryland General Assembly. Going back about two weeks before the latest 90-day regular session of the Maryland General Assembly was slated to draw to a close, there was talk of a special session being called, either right after the regular session that ended at midnight Monday into Tuesday, or possibly in the fall. There's only one good reason to have a special session, and that reason has been in place for decades.
EXPLORE
April 12, 2012
"The Maryland General Assembly meets in Annapolis each year for 90 days to act on more than 2300 bills including the State's annual budget. " That's the first line in the Maryland General Assembly's official web page. But this year, it's a lie. Because this year, lawmakers failed to act on the state's annual budget, ending their 90-day session at midnight before they could vote on a hastily arranged compromise reached by their leaders, and prompting the so-called "doomsday" budget to kick in, a budget balanced by millions of dollars in cuts.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley on Thursday accepted some of the blame for the budget impasse that left the state with a spending plan that cuts about half a billion dollars from key Democratic priorities such as education. "We all hold blame," O'Malley, a Democrat, said on WTOP's monthly Ask the Governor show. "We're all public servants. ... When the public is ill-served, as the public is right now, we all share the responsibility. " "I wish we had had a different result," he said. "It was not for lack of trying.
NEWS
April 11, 2012
Our state elected officials continue to amaze me - and not in as good way. Our legislature had 90 days to do its work, its most important task being the budget. Ninety days was not long enough to take a hard look at programs and expenses and make the difficult choices necessary to cut spending and balance our budget? Now, we the taxpayers will foot the bill for a special session because our elected officials couldn't do their job? Only in government. Let's take the doomsday budget.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | April 10, 2012
The youngest member of Maryland's state senate sent email to constituents Tuesday saying that he was "embarrassed" by the so-called "Doomsday" budget that passed in the General Assembly with his support. Sen. Bill Ferguson, a Baltimore Democrat, said that he cast his green vote on "what we believed" was a compromise spending plan that included a "Doomsday" clause. The budget that passed closes a roughly $1 billion revenue shortfall mostly with cuts, firing hundreds of state workers and making deep cuts in education and other Democratic priorities.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
Democratic lawmakers limped out of Annapolis Tuesday having enacted a "doomsday" budget that slashes spending for education and other services they do not want to cut — and with no clear plan on how to fix a political mess of their own making. House Speaker Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller — whose clashes over gambling helped bring about a chaotic ending to the 2012 General Assembly session Monday night — agreed that a special session is needed to fix Maryland's budget.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for partly sunny skies, steady winds and a high temperature in the mid-50s. Overnight lows are expected to be in the 30s. TRAFFIC Check our traffic map for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT... Police officer kills self after traffic stop, chase : A Montgomery County police officer shot himself to death after leading a Maryland State Police trooper on a high-speed chase on the Eastern Shore early Monday, state police said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
The Maryland General Assembly's regular 90-day session ended in disarray Monday at midnight as legislators failed to approve an income tax measure to which their leaders had agreed. The lack of action meant that a so-called "doomsday" budget — balanced entirely through hundreds of millions of dollars of cuts — is in place for the fiscal year that begins July 1. House and Senate leaders said they would ask the governor to call a special session this week to allow them to take up a plan to increase income taxes to avoid the most severe cuts.
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