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Doomsday Budget

NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | April 8, 1992
The recurring financial nightmare county officials thought would never really happen may come true this week.The General Assembly, unable to agree on a fiscal 1993 budget, appears likely now to pass a so-called doomsday budget that would virtually eliminate state aid to local governments and school boards."
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NEWS
By Herb McMillan | April 30, 2012
It's a "doomsday" budget! The sky is falling! Deep, deep cuts that will destroy education, health care and public safety! The governor must call a special session - wait, make that two special sessions, at taxpayer expense, first to "fix" the budget and then to expand gambling. The media have analyzed the politics and personalities behind the failure of Gov. Martin O'Malley, House Speaker Michael Busch, and Senate PresidentThomas V. Mike Miller to come to agreement on tax increases, special fund transfers and gambling proposals.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff writer | April 5, 1992
Pay raise prospects for about 5,200 Howard County government and public school employees are hanging in the gap between the state House of Delegates and the Senate over a 1992-1993 budget.Negotiators for the county government and Board of Education have not mentioned dollar amounts for raises in talks with employee unions. They have also postponed some scheduled negotiating sessions because of the budget uncertainty.The county and school system have about 4,100 unionized employees, but non-union employees usually receive parallel raises.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
The state university system's Board of Regents approved a 3 percent tuition increase Wednesday for most in-state students, bringing a routine close to a budget process that was briefly thrown into chaos by the General Assembly's inability to agree on a spending plan. Though the university system received $5.3 million in cuts in Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposed $2 billion operating budget for 2013, the trims were not deep enough to force a change in the planned tuition increase. "It's a small enough number that I think the campuses will be able to absorb it without any significant impact to student services or to academic quality," said Chancellor William E. Kirwan of the cut. System workers will not face furloughs, Kirwan said, though most salaries will remain frozen aside from a 2 percent cost-of-living increase scheduled to begin Jan. 1. The presidents of each campus will decide how to implement the cuts.
NEWS
April 13, 2012
Seems like the so-called "doomsday" budget might be the way to go for a year ("After breakdown, what?" April 11). F. Cordell, Lutherville
NEWS
April 27, 2012
We write as members and leaders of Maryland's faith community. We are glad that a special session of the Maryland General Assembly to resolve the state's budget impasse now seems likely. We cannot stress strongly enough how vital it is to fashion a full fix to the doomsday budgetary scenario We each witness in our own congregations and communities the harm the Great Recession has wrought. Now is decidedly not the time to slash more from a state budget that already has left families and communities reeling.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
Wednesday's front page was a lesson in vision for Maryland. In one corner, Freeman A. Hrabowski III is named as one of the 100 most influential people in the U.S. by Time for what he has been able to do as president of the University of Maryland Baltimore County. In the opposite corner, Del. Anthony J. O'Donnell encourages the General Assembly to leave the state's "doomsday" budget in place. The reason we are facing doom is that Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller "ran out of time" in doing the one job that the legislature has to get done - passing an annual budget.
NEWS
April 13, 2012
Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller should promptly step down following his outrageous, irresponsible, unprofessional, petulant, self-centered performance during the final days and hours of the just-completed 90-day session of the General Assembly ("Debacle in Annapolis," April 11). He purposely sabotaged the budget compromise for his personal campaign to expand gambling to a sixth site in Maryland. Senator Miller's arrogance and egotism are breathtaking. Mr. Miller then has the audacity to suggest yet another, special session of the General Assembly at an additional cost of $21,000 to $100,000 per day to the already-overburdened Maryland taxpayers.
NEWS
May 9, 2012
The true reflection of the quality of leaders comes from their ability to lead when things don't go well or according to plan. Even with immense responsibility, it's much easier to lead when things go well. Effective leaders are those who during times of difficulty take actions true to their beliefs and not merely for political gain. On April 9, the Maryland General Assembly session did not end well or go according to plan. The state budget did not pass both chambers, hence the "doomsday" budget that some are describing as disastrous while others claim is not so bad. If Marylanders value educating our citizens and future leaders through high quality K-12 public education for all students, the importance of affordability for those attending community colleges or four-year institutions, the safety and security of their communities, and the investment in the future economic development through research and incentives to secure the qualities of life all desire, then the "doomsday" budget is, indeed, a disaster.
NEWS
By William E. Kirwan | April 23, 2012
Earlier this month, both houses of the Maryland General Assembly passed the state's fiscal 2013 operating budget, but both houses failed to pass tax legislation and a companion bill required to fund and implement the budget. As a result, our state faces two possibilities. Ideally, GovernorMartin O'Malleyand the legislative leadership will work out their differences, reconvene in a special session, and pass the legislation necessary for the FY 2013 budget to go into effect as lawmakers intended on July 1, 2012.
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