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Doomsday Budget

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NEWS
April 11, 2012
Our state elected officials continue to amaze me - and not in as good way. Our legislature had 90 days to do its work, its most important task being the budget. Ninety days was not long enough to take a hard look at programs and expenses and make the difficult choices necessary to cut spending and balance our budget? Now, we the taxpayers will foot the bill for a special session because our elected officials couldn't do their job? Only in government. Let's take the doomsday budget.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley will meet with Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch Thursday afternoon in the State House as the three begin making plans for the 2013 legislative session. O'Malley spokeswoman Takirra Winfield said likely topics include the state budget, transportation funding and the governor's proposal to encourage offshore wind power. She said she did not know whether another potential issue, repeal of the death penalty, would come up. Winfield said she did not know the exact time when the three would meet.
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NEWS
April 26, 2012
Letter writer Raymond Hoff bemoans what he calls UMBC's "doomsday" budget, which is really a "live within your means" budget ("UMBC excellence imperiled by 'doomsday,'" April 23). Mr. Hoff complains that UMBC faculty and staff have not had a cost-of-living increase in three years. But he should be happy to still have a job - a luxury not available to legions of unemployed Marylanders, some of whom have been unemployed for three years. He talks about academics who have moved out of the state and the difficulty of hiring replacements for them.
EXPLORE
August 2, 2012
Editor: Our governor has just ordered up yet another special session for Maryland's General Assembly. We legislators must return to Annapolis for the second time this short, hot summer. This time, ostensibly to take up the issue of expanded gaming in the great state of Maryland. As you may recall, the governor convened a special session early this summer. The reason we went back initially was to amend the so-called "Doomsday Budget. " That budget was actually a default spending plan, and I opposed the increase in taxes that ultimately passed in Special Session 1.0. Now, weeks later we are going back, for a double header in 2012.
NEWS
March 19, 2010
Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake came into office last month with a huge budget deficit but also a promise to set priorities to protect the services that are most essential and to let go those things the city can no longer afford. She wasn't terribly specific at the time about what that meant in practical terms, and so it would be easy to grow alarmed about the details City Council members have heard so far about how the budget is shaping up. The preliminary plan calls for the closure of three fire stations and the continuation of rotating closures; the elimination of the police helicopter, marine and mounted units; the end of bulk trash collection; and the closure of rec centers.
NEWS
April 18, 2012
When the Maryland General Assembly began last January, Gov. Martin O'Malley came with a shopping list of new taxes and increased spending. When the legislature could not agree on a plan to raise taxes and spending, the governor labeled the budget a "doomsday" budget, and The Sun took up the siren call ("Debacle in Annapolis," April 11). In a period of economic recession, only the politicians in Annapolis would call holding the line on increased taxes and increased spending a "Doomsday Budget.
NEWS
April 17, 2012
Maryland taxpayers actually gain in the "budget mess" recently created by the General Assembly in failing to agree on a fiscal 2013 spending plan. Let's be clear, if Maryland had set the new budget at the level of the 2009 budget, we would be in significant surplus! Why is it that our high-paid legislators think they can go after taxpayers when they decide more money will be spent? If I want to spend more money next year, I can not tell my boss, "This is the increase you will pay me. " Wise up, legislators and The Sun. I am a taxpayer and I am mad as hell and am not going to take it anymore!
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2012
Senators from Baltimore and the state's largest counties reacted with dismay Tuesday as the General Assembly's chief policy analyst laid out the details of what has been dubbed "the doomsday budget. " Warren Deschenaux walked the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee through a list of deep cuts to state and local programs that would be necessary if legislators don't vote to raise taxes and shift some teacher pension costs to the counties - measures proposed by Gov.Martin O'Malley.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
State aid to public schools and universities could be slashed, 500 state jobs abolished and local law enforcement grants eliminated under a "doomsday" budget prepared for the Maryland Senate to show the impact of a budget balanced without tax increases. The budget cutting would especially be hard on Baltimore, which would lose almost $75 million in state aid — including $34 million for education and $10 million for law enforcement. The $720 million in cuts are part of what Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller has called a doomsday budget, prepared for the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee as an alternative to Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal to raise about $300 million in additional revenue, largely through an increase in the income taxes paid by Marylanders earning $100,000 or more.
NEWS
April 16, 2012
We have heard for the past few days that the budget impasse in the state legislature will cause a "doomsday" budget to go into effect July 1 ("Schools, localities face the unknown," April 12). Examination of the state budgets shows that the so called "doomsday" budget totals $35.3 billion, down from a proposed budget for next year of $35.8 billion. So "doomsday" means the government will have to reduce its proposed budget by 1.4 percent or the roof will cave in. And take note of the fact that the expected spending level for the state this year is $34.8 billion!
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
The state university system's Board of Regents approved a 3 percent tuition increase Wednesday for most in-state students, bringing a routine close to a budget process that was briefly thrown into chaos by the General Assembly's inability to agree on a spending plan. Though the university system received $5.3 million in cuts in Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposed $2 billion operating budget for 2013, the trims were not deep enough to force a change in the planned tuition increase. "It's a small enough number that I think the campuses will be able to absorb it without any significant impact to student services or to academic quality," said Chancellor William E. Kirwan of the cut. System workers will not face furloughs, Kirwan said, though most salaries will remain frozen aside from a 2 percent cost-of-living increase scheduled to begin Jan. 1. The presidents of each campus will decide how to implement the cuts.
NEWS
May 23, 2012
This is the season when local governments finalize their budgets for the next fiscal year, and the grousing about their penurious circumstances is in full swing. Some are even complaining that the state's revised budget and tax plan - signed into law by Gov.Martin O'Malleythis week - has put a serious crimp in their finances. In particular, they blame the state's decision to shift a portion of the cost of teacher retirement contributions to Baltimore City and the counties as ruinous to their own budgets.
NEWS
May 18, 2012
Our governor and the legislative leadership have given new meaning to the word "dysfunctional" as a description of the state's legislative process. The ineptitude that was exhibited during the 90-day legislative session and the dishonest dialogue coming from our state leaders in the special session is astounding. The governor proposed $1.2 billion in increased spending, then called it a "doomsday budget" when that amount was reduced by $500 million. The result - $700 million in new, increased spending and a tax increase to pay for it. How in the devil is this a cut in spending?
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2012
The Maryland Senate passed an income tax increase and a shift of some of the cost of teacher pensions to the counties Tuesday, averting more than $500 million in so-called Doomsday budget cuts that otherwise would have taken effect July 1. On the second day of what is expected to be a three-day special session, the Senate voted 27-19 for the $264 million  tax  package, with the chamber's 12 Republicans and 7 Democrats opposed. The vote on the budget companion measure that includes the teacher pension shift was 33-13.
NEWS
May 15, 2012
If the state budget that is to be voted on this week in Annapolis is so important, then why did Gov.Martin O'Malley have the General Assembly spend the first half of the regular legislative session debating and then voting on the same-sex marriage legislation instead of doing "the very important job" (in the governor's words) of the budget? This is a total waste of the taxpayers money. We should stick with the so-called "doomsday" budget. In these hard economic times, we should be looking to reduce spending, not increase it by over $1 billion.
NEWS
May 14, 2012
Republican lawmakers opened Monday's special session with a roar of protest, denouncing Gov. Martin O'Malley as a liar and vowing to fight the majority Democrats' plans to raise income taxes and shift part of the cost of teacher pensions to the counties. Several dozen GOP senators and delegates held a news conference on the first floor of the State House and directed much of their fire at the occupant of the office on the floor above. House Minority Leader Anthony J. O'Donnell, a Calvert County Republican, told of hearing on the radio on the way  to Annapolis that lawmakers were coming into session to cut an additional $600 million in spending -- an interpretation he said had come from the governor's office.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Baltimore school employees would be forced to take furlough days if the district has to absorb millions of dollars in education cuts outlined in the state's "doomsday" budget, city schools CEO Andrés Alonso said Tuesday as he prepared to present the fiscal year 2013 budget. In preparation for a massive cut to public education should lawmakers fail to approve higher taxes in a special session starting Monday, the school system has developed a plan to negotiate with labor unions to have employees take four unpaid days off. Alonso said the system found that the four furlough days, which would not include instructional days, would yield enough savings to hold school budgets untouched, a guiding principle of the system's budget.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | April 8, 1992
The recurring financial nightmare county officials thought would never really happen may come true this week.The General Assembly, unable to agree on a fiscal 1993 budget, appears likely now to pass a so-called doomsday budget that would virtually eliminate state aid to local governments and school boards."
NEWS
May 9, 2012
The true reflection of the quality of leaders comes from their ability to lead when things don't go well or according to plan. Even with immense responsibility, it's much easier to lead when things go well. Effective leaders are those who during times of difficulty take actions true to their beliefs and not merely for political gain. On April 9, the Maryland General Assembly session did not end well or go according to plan. The state budget did not pass both chambers, hence the "doomsday" budget that some are describing as disastrous while others claim is not so bad. If Marylanders value educating our citizens and future leaders through high quality K-12 public education for all students, the importance of affordability for those attending community colleges or four-year institutions, the safety and security of their communities, and the investment in the future economic development through research and incentives to secure the qualities of life all desire, then the "doomsday" budget is, indeed, a disaster.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley and legislative leaders announced Wednesday an agreement to raise taxes on 16 percent of the state's earners and reverse a series of so-called "Doomsday" cuts the General Assembly enacted last month when a budget deal collapsed. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch, both Democrats, said they have lined up the votes to approve the plan, including the super-majority needed in the Senate to break any Republican filibuster attempt.
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