Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDoomsday
IN THE NEWS

Doomsday

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 15, 2012
In my opinion, The Sun does not serve the public well by failing to question the preposterous "doomsday" threats oft repeated by Democrats and Whiner-in-Chief, Gov.Martin O'Malley. John Q. Public is constantly threatened with drastic cuts to the few truly essential services of government whenever the pols can't force us to open our wallets as wide as they would like. Why is it that the state budget for 2013 is $500 million larger than the budget we are surviving on this year? Did we not have enough money to pay for firefighters, teachers and police?
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2012
Well, 12:01 a.m. came and went (even in Mayan Time, otherwise known as Central Time) and nothing really happened. Although Annapolis was plunged into darkness and bathed in an eerie blue light, BGE assures us it wasn't apocalypse-related. Pessimists are still holding out hope though, guessing maybe it will happen at the end of long day's work right before your Christmas vacation starts. Need more conspiracy theories to keep your Mayan Apocalypse hopes alive? Well, " Jersey Shore" has ended its run. Snooki and company will now fade into obscurity, subsisting off of occasional appearances on "Celebrity Ghost Stories" and "Jersey Shore/Shahs of Sunset Challenge XXXIII.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 27, 2012
We write as members and leaders of Maryland's faith community. We are glad that a special session of the Maryland General Assembly to resolve the state's budget impasse now seems likely. We cannot stress strongly enough how vital it is to fashion a full fix to the doomsday budgetary scenario We each witness in our own congregations and communities the harm the Great Recession has wrought. Now is decidedly not the time to slash more from a state budget that already has left families and communities reeling.
SPORTS
December 13, 2012
Everyone can relax now that NASA has put out a video - 10 days ahead of time - explaining why the world didn't end on Dec. 21, which is the final day of the Mayan Calendar and has long been a popular focus of goofball doomsday theorists. The nation's highly respected space agency filmed the YouTube video with the original intention of releasing it on Dec. 22, since it's entitled “Why the World Didn't End Yesterday.” I'm guessing they released it early to avert a Stub Hub meltdown caused by fatalistic football fans trying to dump their tickets for Week 16. Whatever the reason, Ravens fans can rest easy that the only doomsday scenario that might play out over the next nine days is the possibility of M&T Bank Stadium being torched by both Peyton and Eli Manning.
NEWS
April 12, 2012
The Sun's reporters and editors should do their homework before routinely adopting the "doomsday budget" label ("After breakdown, what?" April 11). You do no service to your readers by failing to put state spending into perspective. A 10 year perspective: Maryland's approved budget in 2003 was $22.5 billion; 2013 the approved budget is $34.9 billion, a 55 percent increase over the past 10 years. The population has increased from 5.5 million to 5.8 million, a 9.4 percent increase.
NEWS
April 11, 2012
Our state elected officials continue to amaze me - and not in as good way. Our legislature had 90 days to do its work, its most important task being the budget. Ninety days was not long enough to take a hard look at programs and expenses and make the difficult choices necessary to cut spending and balance our budget? Now, we the taxpayers will foot the bill for a special session because our elected officials couldn't do their job? Only in government. Let's take the doomsday budget.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
Wednesday's front page was a lesson in vision for Maryland. In one corner, Freeman A. Hrabowski III is named as one of the 100 most influential people in the U.S. by Time for what he has been able to do as president of the University of Maryland Baltimore County. In the opposite corner, Del. Anthony J. O'Donnell encourages the General Assembly to leave the state's "doomsday" budget in place. The reason we are facing doom is that Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller "ran out of time" in doing the one job that the legislature has to get done - passing an annual budget.
NEWS
April 25, 2012
The recent op-ed written by William E. Kirwan, chancellor of the University System of Maryland, is similar to Chicken Little declaring that the sky is falling ("Doomsday for Md. higher education," April 24). Mr. Kirwan states that "under the doomsday budget, the USM would be cut nearly $50 million" and would "dictate a double-digit increase for in-state undergraduate tuition, an increase significantly higher than the 3 percent included in the governor's budget proposal. " However, based on information found on the USM's own website (www.usmd.edu)
NEWS
April 26, 2012
Letter writer Raymond Hoff bemoans what he calls UMBC's "doomsday" budget, which is really a "live within your means" budget ("UMBC excellence imperiled by 'doomsday,'" April 23). Mr. Hoff complains that UMBC faculty and staff have not had a cost-of-living increase in three years. But he should be happy to still have a job - a luxury not available to legions of unemployed Marylanders, some of whom have been unemployed for three years. He talks about academics who have moved out of the state and the difficulty of hiring replacements for them.
NEWS
April 13, 2012
Seems like the so-called "doomsday" budget might be the way to go for a year ("After breakdown, what?" April 11). F. Cordell, Lutherville
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | August 30, 2012
Editor: We are all dismayed by the recent closing of the Sparrows Point Steel Mill and the loss of jobs. Much of the blame can be laid at the feet of federal politicians who created policies that helped to destroy the steel industry in America. Now the state politicians in Maryland are engaging in the same type of policies that will destroy the gaming industry before it even gets started. The recent special session of the Maryland General Assembly was a lot like the popular game show, "Let's Make a Deal.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
The state university system's Board of Regents approved a 3 percent tuition increase Wednesday for most in-state students, bringing a routine close to a budget process that was briefly thrown into chaos by the General Assembly's inability to agree on a spending plan. Though the university system received $5.3 million in cuts in Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposed $2 billion operating budget for 2013, the trims were not deep enough to force a change in the planned tuition increase. "It's a small enough number that I think the campuses will be able to absorb it without any significant impact to student services or to academic quality," said Chancellor William E. Kirwan of the cut. System workers will not face furloughs, Kirwan said, though most salaries will remain frozen aside from a 2 percent cost-of-living increase scheduled to begin Jan. 1. The presidents of each campus will decide how to implement the cuts.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley and legislative leaders announced Wednesday an agreement to raise taxes on 16 percent of the state's earners and reverse a series of so-called "Doomsday" cuts the General Assembly enacted last month when a budget deal collapsed. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch, both Democrats, said they have lined up the votes to approve the plan, including the super-majority needed in the Senate to break any Republican filibuster attempt.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Baltimore school employees would be forced to take furlough days if the district has to absorb millions of dollars in education cuts outlined in the state's "doomsday" budget, city schools CEO Andrés Alonso said Tuesday as he prepared to present the fiscal year 2013 budget. In preparation for a massive cut to public education should lawmakers fail to approve higher taxes in a special session starting Monday, the school system has developed a plan to negotiate with labor unions to have employees take four unpaid days off. Alonso said the system found that the four furlough days, which would not include instructional days, would yield enough savings to hold school budgets untouched, a guiding principle of the system's budget.
NEWS
By Herb McMillan | April 30, 2012
It's a "doomsday" budget! The sky is falling! Deep, deep cuts that will destroy education, health care and public safety! The governor must call a special session - wait, make that two special sessions, at taxpayer expense, first to "fix" the budget and then to expand gambling. The media have analyzed the politics and personalities behind the failure of Gov. Martin O'Malley, House Speaker Michael Busch, and Senate PresidentThomas V. Mike Miller to come to agreement on tax increases, special fund transfers and gambling proposals.
NEWS
April 27, 2012
We write as members and leaders of Maryland's faith community. We are glad that a special session of the Maryland General Assembly to resolve the state's budget impasse now seems likely. We cannot stress strongly enough how vital it is to fashion a full fix to the doomsday budgetary scenario We each witness in our own congregations and communities the harm the Great Recession has wrought. Now is decidedly not the time to slash more from a state budget that already has left families and communities reeling.
NEWS
By RONALD FRASER | September 30, 1994
Burke, Virginia. -- Ending an 11-year wait for the rush of VIPs that never arrived, tomorrow the Pentagon will flip off the ''vacancy'' signs that still hang outside a string of secret underground bomb shelters located near Washington. Designed to serve as both home and office for government executives during a nuclear war, these telecommuting centers performed well in make-believe war games. But a fatal human flaw in the $8 billion Doomsday Project would have quickly scuttled the scheme had it been launched under real-life circumstances.
NEWS
March 31, 2004
THE DISCOMFORT caused by rocks and hard places has been oversold. A lot of elected officials who are supposed to be stuck between the two seem downright sanguine about Maryland's budget crisis. Maybe these politicians are too spineless to notice their stony reality. Looks like we need pointier rocks. Here's where things stand: Maryland is facing a long-term deficit. The state is committed to far more spending in future years than the current tax structure will finance. Two years of efforts by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and the General Assembly have failed to produce a solution, only fingers in the fiscal dike.
NEWS
April 26, 2012
Letter writer Raymond Hoff bemoans what he calls UMBC's "doomsday" budget, which is really a "live within your means" budget ("UMBC excellence imperiled by 'doomsday,'" April 23). Mr. Hoff complains that UMBC faculty and staff have not had a cost-of-living increase in three years. But he should be happy to still have a job - a luxury not available to legions of unemployed Marylanders, some of whom have been unemployed for three years. He talks about academics who have moved out of the state and the difficulty of hiring replacements for them.
NEWS
April 25, 2012
The recent op-ed written by William E. Kirwan, chancellor of the University System of Maryland, is similar to Chicken Little declaring that the sky is falling ("Doomsday for Md. higher education," April 24). Mr. Kirwan states that "under the doomsday budget, the USM would be cut nearly $50 million" and would "dictate a double-digit increase for in-state undergraduate tuition, an increase significantly higher than the 3 percent included in the governor's budget proposal. " However, based on information found on the USM's own website (www.usmd.edu)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.