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By MYRON BECKENSTEIN | October 3, 1993
When he died last week after 96 years of life, Jimmy Doolittle was most remembered for the 30 seconds of it he spent over Tokyo early in World War II. But that was just 30 seconds in a long, full life. It is hard to think of anyone who contributed so much to aviation in so many different areas as Doolittle did.The Wright Brothers invented flying; Doolittle added greatly to its dimensions. Lindbergh captured the public imagination, crossed the Atlantic and secretly perfected the Lockheed P-38 during World War II; Doolittle was a military flier, a scientist, an innovator, a racer, a test pilot and a stunt pilot.
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FEATURES
By Tim Swift and Tim Swift,Sun Staff | May 17, 2007
Fatal Songs: "I Believe in You and Me," "Nutbush City Limits" and "I'm a Woman" What Went Wrong: Whoa! Didn't see that one coming. The judges lavished her with praise and compared her to Gladys Knight, Tina Turner, even Celia Cruz. Maybe that was the problem. The show is supposed to find the next big thing. In Doolittle, we found a consummate pro, not an up-and-coming artist. Shining Moment: Pretty much every time she showed up on camera. There is a fine line between good Idol performances and pat karaoke.
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FEATURES
By Tim Swift and Tim Swift,Sun Staff | May 17, 2007
Fatal Songs: "I Believe in You and Me," "Nutbush City Limits" and "I'm a Woman" What Went Wrong: Whoa! Didn't see that one coming. The judges lavished her with praise and compared her to Gladys Knight, Tina Turner, even Celia Cruz. Maybe that was the problem. The show is supposed to find the next big thing. In Doolittle, we found a consummate pro, not an up-and-coming artist. Shining Moment: Pretty much every time she showed up on camera. There is a fine line between good Idol performances and pat karaoke.
NEWS
March 27, 2007
CHASE J. NIELSEN, 90 `Doolittle Raider' Lt. Col. Chase J. Nielsen, a member of the famed "Doolittle Raiders" who bombed Japan in 1942, died Friday at his home in Brigham City, Utah, his family said. He was a navigator in one of the most daring air raids in American history, when 16 B-25 bombers took off from an aircraft carrier and bombed Tokyo on April 18, 1942. Colonel Nielsen and his crew ditched their plane, which was running out of fuel, off the coast of China, and he spent more than three years as a Japanese prisoner of war. He was one of four POWs from the raid to survive.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2005
As Maryland heads into its 21st NCAA tournament, the Terrapins have suffered untimely injuries to two of their top scorers, Annie Collins and Acacia Walker. That has opened the door for a handful of youngsters to prove they can handle the job on the attacking end and in the midfield as the Terrapins (12-6) won five of their last six games. Freshmen Kelly Kasper and Casey Magor and sophomores Katie Doolittle and Krista Pellizzi have combined for 27 goals and 11 assists during the past four games.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | August 4, 1991
Blanche Doolittle Webb wasn't intimidated by the thought of planninga reunion for 100 of her kinfolk.After all, the family's motto is: "Do a little more a little bit better."The reunion, Aug. 6-8 at a Towson hotel, is expected to draw about 100 Doolittles -- from 26 states and Canada.As president of Doolittle Family Inc., the Harford County resident has planned tours of Baltimore and Fort McHenry, and a family meeting as part of the family's three-day biannual reunion next week in Towson.
NEWS
March 27, 2007
CHASE J. NIELSEN, 90 `Doolittle Raider' Lt. Col. Chase J. Nielsen, a member of the famed "Doolittle Raiders" who bombed Japan in 1942, died Friday at his home in Brigham City, Utah, his family said. He was a navigator in one of the most daring air raids in American history, when 16 B-25 bombers took off from an aircraft carrier and bombed Tokyo on April 18, 1942. Colonel Nielsen and his crew ditched their plane, which was running out of fuel, off the coast of China, and he spent more than three years as a Japanese prisoner of war. He was one of four POWs from the raid to survive.
NEWS
By Marc Reisner | August 22, 1995
San Francisco -- IF YOU WANT to see how unserious -- or at least selective -- the Republican revolutionaries in Congress can be about budget-cutting and fiscal reform, I've got a pair of examples for you.California, despite last winter's epic floods, is at heart a semi-desert state, almost rainless for half the year.Dams and aqueducts lubricate its economy. Vast portions of its $20 billion agricultural industry are hooked on federally sponsored dams and taxpayer-subsidized irrigation water.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | October 11, 1992
It's hard enough finding a job when you have experience an self-confidence. Imagine trying to get work when you've just been released from prison.That's the challenge facing clients of Reach, an outreach program that serves female offenders and ex-offenders in Harford County."
NEWS
By Gary A. Warner and Gary A. Warner,Orange County Register | April 18, 1992
Early April 1942. A dark time for the United States. Pearl Harbor bombed. Wake Island fallen. The valiant defense of the Philippines crumbled.Day after day, Americans awoke to news of disaster befalling U.S. troops in the Pacific.Then came the morning of April 19. "TOKYO BOMBED" the headlines screamed. The previous day, Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle and his squadron of B-25 Mitchells had bombed the Japanese capital.Recalled Dick Cole, Colonel Doolittle's co-pilot: "The country's esteem was lower than a frog's posterior.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2005
As Maryland heads into its 21st NCAA tournament, the Terrapins have suffered untimely injuries to two of their top scorers, Annie Collins and Acacia Walker. That has opened the door for a handful of youngsters to prove they can handle the job on the attacking end and in the midfield as the Terrapins (12-6) won five of their last six games. Freshmen Kelly Kasper and Casey Magor and sophomores Katie Doolittle and Krista Pellizzi have combined for 27 goals and 11 assists during the past four games.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 3, 2005
The ninth-ranked Terrapins' Katie Doolittle amassed six points on five goals and one assist and Annie Collins had five points on three goals and two assists in a 14-7 win over host Virginia Tech yesterday. Sophomore Britt Faulkner scored a season-high four goals for Virginia Tech (3-6, 0-1 Atlantic Coast Conference). In the final 10 minutes, Maryland (7-4, 1-2) scored six of the final eight goals. Doolittle scored two of her goals and Collins added one for the Terps. No 5. Duke 16, No. 2 Virginia 12: Powered by Tewaaraton Trophy candidate Katie Chrest's five goals, the visiting Blue Devils (9-2, 2-1 ACC)
NEWS
May 7, 2002
J. Royden Stork, 85, who as co-pilot of a B-25 bomber took part in a daring raid on Tokyo on April 18, 1942, and later became a Hollywood makeup artist, died of a heart attack Thursday at Century City Hospital in California. The raid, led by Lt. Col. James H. Doolittle, was the first successful American retaliatory strike after Japan's bombing of Pearl Harbor, which brought the United States into World War II. Mr. Stork was co-pilot of the 10th of 16 land-based B-25 bombers to take off from the deck of the USS Hornet -- a feat never before attempted and considered by many a suicide mission for the 80 men aboard.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 16, 2001
COLUMBIA, S.C. - After the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, America retaliated by sending 16 B-25s to bomb Tokyo. The bombers took off from the deck of an aircraft carrier - a military first. Today, the surviving heroes of Gen. Jimmy Doolittle's raid say America should react to the attacks on New York and Washington with equal ferocity and imagination. "We should lower the boom, that's for sure," said Horace "Sally" Crouch of Columbia, a navigator and bombardier in the raid.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2000
For the next two months, Chesapeake Music Hall will be a "loverly" spot with "My Fair Lady" in residence. Based on George Bernard Shaw's 1914 play "Pygmalion," this delightful musical has lyrics and dialogue by Alan Jay Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe. It opened on Broadway in March 1956 and ran for 2,717 performances, a record number then. "My Fair Lady" made Broadway musical history with Lerner and Loewe's score, which retained Shaw's sharp wit and added warmth, charm and enchanting melody.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 19, 1996
LONDON -- In London's Theatre Museum, the expression, "Give me a hand," is taken literally. Well, almost.Among the exhibits at this distinctive museum is a corridor of autographed, multicolored handprints made by such members of Britain's theatrical elite as Ian McKellen and Diana Rigg. (Timothy Dalton's was dirty and smudged from visitors fitting their hands over it.)This British re-interpretation of the cement prints at Grauman's Chinese Theatre in California is just one of the unusual displays at a museum that proves not all London theater takes place on stage.
NEWS
May 7, 2002
J. Royden Stork, 85, who as co-pilot of a B-25 bomber took part in a daring raid on Tokyo on April 18, 1942, and later became a Hollywood makeup artist, died of a heart attack Thursday at Century City Hospital in California. The raid, led by Lt. Col. James H. Doolittle, was the first successful American retaliatory strike after Japan's bombing of Pearl Harbor, which brought the United States into World War II. Mr. Stork was co-pilot of the 10th of 16 land-based B-25 bombers to take off from the deck of the USS Hornet -- a feat never before attempted and considered by many a suicide mission for the 80 men aboard.
NEWS
October 1, 1993
An old saw of the lore of flight says "there are old pilots and there are bold pilots, but there are no old, bold pilots." Lt. Gen. James H. Doolittle, the legendary Army aviator and World War II hero who died Monday at the age of 96, was the gloriously intrepid exception who proved the rule.The general's fighting spirit was shaped by a boyhood on the Alaska frontier, where his father had been drawn by gold rush fever around the turn of the century. Young Doolittle learned to mix it up on the rough streets of Nome and briefly considered a professional boxing career before enlisting in the Army Signal Corps during World War I, where he earned a commission as a pilot and instructor.
NEWS
By Marc Reisner | August 22, 1995
San Francisco -- IF YOU WANT to see how unserious -- or at least selective -- the Republican revolutionaries in Congress can be about budget-cutting and fiscal reform, I've got a pair of examples for you.California, despite last winter's epic floods, is at heart a semi-desert state, almost rainless for half the year.Dams and aqueducts lubricate its economy. Vast portions of its $20 billion agricultural industry are hooked on federally sponsored dams and taxpayer-subsidized irrigation water.
NEWS
By MYRON BECKENSTEIN | October 3, 1993
When he died last week after 96 years of life, Jimmy Doolittle was most remembered for the 30 seconds of it he spent over Tokyo early in World War II. But that was just 30 seconds in a long, full life. It is hard to think of anyone who contributed so much to aviation in so many different areas as Doolittle did.The Wright Brothers invented flying; Doolittle added greatly to its dimensions. Lindbergh captured the public imagination, crossed the Atlantic and secretly perfected the Lockheed P-38 during World War II; Doolittle was a military flier, a scientist, an innovator, a racer, a test pilot and a stunt pilot.
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