Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDonna Summer
IN THE NEWS

Donna Summer

FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 27, 2007
With all her tabloid drama in the past few years (the wobbly marriage and messy divorce, the rehab, the custody battle, the pathetic MTV "comeback" performance), it's easy to forget that Britney Spears once made infectious and sometimes excellent pop music. The sad details of her chaotic personal life have all but obliterated her success as a performer. But she remains one of the biggest-selling female artists of all time; she's sold more than 83 million albums since her 1999 debut, ... Baby One More Time.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2011
Hammerjacks, Baltimore's shrine to big hair, loud dresses and heavy metal, is plotting a comeback. An Anne Arundel County man has bought the trademark to sell Hammerjacks-related merchandise. And, he said he's negotiating with developers for a new branded club near the planned Baltimore slots casino off Russell Street. His plans are the second time a revival of the iconic megaclub has been attempted since it closed in 1997; a 2000 reincarnation failed to win over the original's legions of fans, which included, over the years, the likes of Bret Michaels and the classy lady pictured above.  Kevin Butler, a 47-year-old mortgage executive from Anne Arundel County, was a regular at the Howard Street location of Hammerjacks; the club originally opened in 1977 on South Charles Street, but it was the club under an Interstate 395 overpass that became iconic.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 2, 1998
When VH1 aired its big "Divas Live" special in April, some folks wondered how Gloria Estefan sneaked into the line-up. After all, when it comes to making a bravura display of vocal virtuosity, Estefan is not on the same level as fellow VH1 divas Aretha Franklin, Celine Dion, or Mariah Carey.But if Estefan isn't quite a diva in the pop or operatic sense, she surely qualifies as a disco diva. She made her name belting out dance tunes with the Miami Sound Machine, and still owes a sizable portion of her audience to such oldies as "Conga" and "Rhythm Is Gonna Get You."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 1, 2004
There was something warm and real about the sound of vinyl: the pops and hisses. Placing the needle down on the groove made you feel as if you were part of the music. But some of us wouldn't know anything about that, because the compact disc has been around for more than two decades. For those of us who remember LPs and how versatile the cover could be (a wall decoration, a fan, a dust pan), we experience something new and exciting when we hear our old records digitally remastered. (Was that guitar line always so resonant?
ENTERTAINMENT
Tionah Lee and For The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
It's semi-finals time! Monday night's episode of "The Voice" kicked off the semi-finals with two performances from each of the remaining five contestants. The semi-finals weren't only about competition, but also dedications and homecomings. Each contestant got to take a trip back home to see those who voted for them and have supported them week after week in the competition. (Hello Texas, Massachusetts, New York City and Oklahoma). Kicking off the show was a performance by coach Usher.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1997
By 10: 30 on Thursday nights, disc jockey Bobby Nyk's 1970s biosphere throbs with hustling, bumping, pretzeling, booty-shaking, uh-HUH uh-HUH retro rhythms.Strobe, black light, smoke machine, beacon and a rotating, high-voltage monster called the Mace have transformed the Belvedere Hotel's swank, 13th-floor bar into a disco inferno.The "piece de resistance," a mirror ball, shoots a dizzying galaxy of whirling stars across the small dance floor, where Nyk and three volunteers have become the Village People, complete with hard hat, headdress, policeman's hat and that ridiculous Gilligan sailor cap.As if the nonsensical ditty were part of their primordial memory bank, the four men lip sync and perform the signature moves to "Y.M.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 10, 2000
For many Baltimoreans, the name Hammerjacks evokes the big-hair, hard rockin' '80s, a time of spandex and torn jeans, mascara and mousse, black leather and pink lace. Hammerjacks was home to glam bands and hard-rock honeys, where Guns N' Roses made its local debut and Bret Michaels of Poison went to hang. It was the place to see Kix, Ratt, Skid Row or Extreme. Well, get over it, Baltimore. The new Hammerjacks is a different experience altogether. "Hammerjacks 1980 was then, and Hammerjacks 2000 is now," says Louie Principio, owner of the new club, which celebrates its grand opening tonight.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 19, 1997
That Brian Transeau works at home is not particularly unusual. A number of his neighbors in rural Montgomery County do the same, farming or telecommuting.It's the kind of work Transeau does that seems out of the ordinary. He makes music -- electronic dance music, to be exact. Recording under the name BT, the 26-year-old singer and multi-instrumentalist is a rapidly rising part of the genre's vanguard, ranking with such cutting-edge acts as Moby, the Chemical Brothers, Crystal Method and Prodigy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Music Critic | May 25, 2000
Whitney Houston The Greatest Hits (Arista 07822-14626) A greatest-hits album should be a fairly straightforward affair. Unlike a "Best of" collection, which can pretend to differentiate between an artist's most popular and most worthy work, a hits album is by definition obliged to take its cues from the pop charts, and deliver said star's smashes. Anything else amounts to false advertising. So how, then, do we explain the new Whitney Houston package, "The Greatest Hits"? With 36 tracks spread across two CDs, it should have ample room for all her hits.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Singing nuns have always proved irresistible. There was the Belgian sensation who made "Dominique" a chart-topper in the 1960s, Today, there's Sister Cristina Scuccia, the Sicilian star of Italian TV and YouTube who belts out Alicia Keys songs, and the sweet-voiced, Missouri-based Benedictines of Mary, Queen of Apostles, whose CDs of Gregorian chant are best-sellers. And coming to Baltimore this week are some very vocal nuns who get into the habit of shaking up church services at Queen of Angels Cathedral in Philadelphia with the help of high-voltage songs.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.