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By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
See who ruled during disco's last big summer, via Billboard's Hot 100 chart archive. 10. "She Believes in Me," Kenny Rogers The Gambler? In 1979? At his peak. About as far from disco as one gets, "She Believes in Me" was a No. 1 country hit and written by Steve Gibb (unrelated to the Bee Gees Gibbs). 9. "Shake Your Body" (Down to the Ground)," the Jacksons The Jacksons' best disco-era effort. 8. "Chuck E.'s In Love," Rickie Lee Jones Jones' biggest hit (she would go on to win the Best New Artist Grammy in January 1980)
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FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | May 6, 1994
Tonight's best bet: the new "Hart to Hart" movie. Nah -- only kidding. Just wanted to see if you were reading this paragraph before jumping down to the individual program notes.* "Family Matters." (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Donna Summer guest stars as Urkel's Aunt Oona from Altoona, a dowdy woman who no soona visits a karaoke bar than she turns into a real croona. ABC.* "Hart to Hart: Old Friends Never Die." (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- They just star in TV remakes. NBC.* "The X-Files" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45)
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | September 2, 1994
Due to entirely accidental alignments in tonight's network schedules, viewers can, by switching channels at the appropriate times, treat themselves to an instant mini-festival showcasing Carl Lumbly in different shows and roles. Three straight hours of him! If that doesn't precisely meet your definition of must-see television, then you've gotten my point.* "Family Matters." (8-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Donna Summer guest stars as Urkel's Aunt Oona, who visits bearing gifts (which, in this case, might be called Oona mementos)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | June 22, 1995
A couple of 8 o'clock movies offer interesting choices, while cable viewers have another chance to see Michael Jackson, on an annual awards program.* "Past the Bleachers" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Known for his action roles ("MacGyver" and the recent "Legend" on UPN), Richard Dean Anderson tackles a softer part in this new movie, filmed in Atlanta. Grieving over the death of his son, his character encounters a mute young boy (Grayson Fricke) who plays on the Little League baseball team he coaches.
NEWS
By GLENN McNatt | May 12, 1996
WE HAD DRIVEN deep into Virginia on the way to Grandma and Grandpop's, almost to the North Carolina border, when Brother Bob flipped the car radio to an oldies station out of Roanoke.The Marvelettes were singing in thin, adolescent-girl voices, "Beechwood 4-5789."And all of a sudden, the words just popped out of my mouth: "You can call me up and have a day-ate, any ol' time!"Brother Bob thought that was strange indeed. "What the heck was that?" he asked, peering at me as he careened our rented van down U.S. 29. "Don't tell me you're going through some sort of second adolescence?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 8, 2004
Her sound was inviting, passion-soaked, beautifully soulful. But where did it fit exactly? It was 1978 and disco was king, ruling the R&B charts, where Angela Bofill, an ebony-eyed, full-lipped Latina from the West Bronx, found an immediate home. Alongside beat-driven albums by Instant Funk, Donna Summer, Chic and Sister Sledge, Bofill's debut, Angie, stood out on the listings for its eclecticism: a classy, intelligent mix of African chants, smooth jazz and uptown soul. Angel of the Night, her sophomore effort, appeared nine months after Angie and was a bigger smash, featuring the Quiet Storm, self-penned classic "I Try."
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1999
MIAMI -- Jamal Anderson knows that a showman needs to keep coming up with new material. That's why the fifth-year Atlanta Falcons running back is promising a new dance to top the Dirty Bird in Super Bowl XXXIII. "Watch me when I score," he said. Notice the word "when." Not if. If ever a player were made for the Super Bowl, it's Anderson. Not only is he good enough to be Atlanta's top offensive weapon, but he's also savvy enough to understand what kind of stage the Super Bowl is. In an era when many athletes are uncomfortble in the spotlight, he relishes in it. Celebrity is nothing new for him because his father, James Anderson, was a bodyguard for celebrities.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | December 31, 2008
Clintons to join Bloomberg in ringing in the new year Tonight, Sen. Hillary Clinton and former President Bill Clinton will be in Times Square, helping New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg lower the glittery New Year's Eve ball. The Clintons will lead hundreds of thousands of revelers in the final 60-second countdown and push the ceremonial button that lowers the ball. Up to a million people are expected tonight to wait for the clock to strike midnight, with the forecast calling for snow and temperatures in the low 30s. Portions of the event will be televised live on ABC and other networks.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1997
Reunions on CBS, revelations on ABC and a remarkable film on Showtime: an eclectic mix for a Friday night."Family Matters" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Disco diva Donna Summer plays Aunt Oona, a wonderful singer who's convinced she's too heavy. So it's Urkel to the rescue? Doesn't take a genius to figure Aunt Oona's in trouble. ABC."The Dukes of Hazzard: Reunion" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Sorry guys, no more short shorts for Daisy. But everything else is pretty much the same, as the Dukes, the General Lee and almost all the other fun folks of Hazzard return.
NEWS
August 18, 2003
Procedural regularity When the Baltimore County school board meets, it takes full advantage of the time left in the evening. Meetings often stretch for hours, straining more than attention spans. By 10 p.m., 2 1/2 hours into a meeting, everyone is more than ready for a bathroom break, which is sometimes called. Not last Tuesday night, though. Concluding the meeting at 9 p.m., President James R. Sasiadek proudly noted there was no need for a break. Then he invoked parliamentary procedure to end the meeting, saying, "I will take a movement - a move - to adjourn."
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