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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1997
HALLANDALE, Fla. -- The interviews were over. The reporters had raced off to find the winners, leaving Sonny Hine standing alone in the lengthening shadows of a Florida afternoon.Sonny was waiting for his wife, Carolyn. A native of Baltimore, she had just watched the best horse she has ever owned and the best horse her husband has ever trained, Skip Away, finish second in his first race of 1997."The owner's smiling," Sonny said, as Carolyn approached. "That's always good.""I'm not disappointed," Carolyn said, smiling weakly.
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By THE RECORD (HACKENSACK, N.J.) | February 3, 2001
Older runners will take the spotlight this weekend in major $500,000 Grade I stakes. Tiznow can cap an incredible week today when he faces five rivals in the $500,000 Strub Stakes for 4-year-olds at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, Calif. The race will be the first for Tiznow since being crowned Horse of the Year for 2000 on Tuesday night. Tiznow, who has six victories in 10 career starts and earnings of more than $3.5 million, has been bothered by foot problems throughout the winter, but he showed no ill effects in winning the San Fernando Stakes at Santa Anita on Jan. 13. Down in Hallandale, Fla., Captain Steve and Albert The Great square off in the Donn Handicap, the season debut for both 4-year-olds.
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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1999
Silver Charm helps launch an inaugural "NTRA Champions on Fox" series today on the Fox network that will conclude Aug. 29 with the Pacific Classic at Del Mar.Despite breaking from the far outside and conceding six to 16 pounds to his 11 rivals, Silver Charm is the 8-5 morning-line favorite in the $500,000 Donn Handicap, a 1 1/8-mile Grade I stakes at Gulfstream Park.The race will be televised on Fox (Chs. 45, 5) beginning at 4 p.m.The series of 11 races is designed to showcase the nation's older horses as they compete for millions of dollars in bonuses.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1999
Silver Charm helps launch an inaugural "NTRA Champions on Fox" series today on the Fox network that will conclude Aug. 29 with the Pacific Classic at Del Mar.Despite breaking from the far outside and conceding six to 16 pounds to his 11 rivals, Silver Charm is the 8-5 morning-line favorite in the $500,000 Donn Handicap, a 1 1/8-mile Grade I stakes at Gulfstream Park.The race will be televised on Fox (Chs. 45, 5) beginning at 4 p.m.The series of 11 races is designed to showcase the nation's older horses as they compete for millions of dollars in bonuses.
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | February 25, 1995
HALLANDALE, Fla. -- Wallenda, who won more than $1.2 million for the Dogwood Stable, suffered a tear in superficial flexor tendon in his left front ankle and will be retired. The injury was detected by trainer Frank Alexander during a workout this week at Calder Race Course. The 5-year-old son of Gulch ran eighth in his 33rd and last race, the Donn Handicap at Gulfstream Park two weeks ago. Wallenda won stakes at 2, 3 and 4 years old, won seven of his 33 races and ran in the money 17 times.
SPORTS
By THE RECORD (HACKENSACK, N.J.) | February 3, 2001
Older runners will take the spotlight this weekend in major $500,000 Grade I stakes. Tiznow can cap an incredible week today when he faces five rivals in the $500,000 Strub Stakes for 4-year-olds at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, Calif. The race will be the first for Tiznow since being crowned Horse of the Year for 2000 on Tuesday night. Tiznow, who has six victories in 10 career starts and earnings of more than $3.5 million, has been bothered by foot problems throughout the winter, but he showed no ill effects in winning the San Fernando Stakes at Santa Anita on Jan. 13. Down in Hallandale, Fla., Captain Steve and Albert The Great square off in the Donn Handicap, the season debut for both 4-year-olds.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee j | May 11, 1991
The last time a Preakness winner returned to run at Pimlico Race Course was in 1988, when 1987 Preakness winner Alysheba ran in the Pimlico Special.And now Summer Squall is here.But he has had just one sprint since a layoff, and trainer Neil Howard has found himself defending that strategy in the days leading up to today's Pimlico Special.When a horse has been away, conditioning always comes into question. Another factor to consider is the horse's tendency to show more early speed than might otherwise be expected.
SPORTS
By James H. Jackson and James H. Jackson,Staff Writer | August 9, 1992
The love affair between the thoroughbred racing industry and the American Championship Racing Series may soon be over.The series was started in 1991 as a way to spark media interest in the coverage of racing, and the first year was a huge success.Nationally televised matchups of star horses like Unbridled, Summer Squall, Festin, Jolie's Halo and Farma Way resulted in record simulcast monies for host tracks.Pimlico Race Course did $6,209,800 for the simulcast of its Pimlico Special; Gulfstream Park did $3,883,881 in simulcast money for its Donn Handicap; Oaklawn Park, $6,307,211 for the Oaklawn Handicap; Santa Anita, $5,007,629 for the Santa Anita Handicap; Hollywood Park, $5,219,078 for the Hollywood Gold Cup; Rockingham Park, $2,192,685 for the New England Classic; and Belmont Park, $3,360,035 for the Nassau County Handicap.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 8, 1991
LAUREL -- Dave Rodman has been named the race-caller at Laurel and Pimlico race courses, filling a position marked by instability the past two years.Rodman, 32, has been the announcer at Louisiana Downs in Shreveport, La., since October 1984. He will begin his new duties March 14, when racing moves from Laurel to Pimlico.Since Robin Burns resigned in April 1989, track officials have had a hard time filling the position on a permanent basis. After Burns' departure, seven men called races at either track: Ray Haight, Jack Salter, Trevor Denman, Milo Perrins, Doug Vair, Jehan Malherbe and John Curren.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2002
Maryland-based Include is the overnight favorite in today's Grade II, $500,000 Massachusetts Handicap at Suffolk Downs. Listed at 9-5 odds, Include is one of three Grade I winners in a strong field, having captured the 2001 Pimlico Special. The others are Mongoose (3-1), who took the Donn Handicap in January, and Macho Uno (2-1), champion of the 2000 Breeders' Cup Juvenile. "Include is doing great," said his trainer, Grover "Buddy" Delp. "He's going just the way I want. Mongoose and Macho Uno have been away a good long time and should be at the top of their game, so we better be on top of ours."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1997
HALLANDALE, Fla. -- The interviews were over. The reporters had raced off to find the winners, leaving Sonny Hine standing alone in the lengthening shadows of a Florida afternoon.Sonny was waiting for his wife, Carolyn. A native of Baltimore, she had just watched the best horse she has ever owned and the best horse her husband has ever trained, Skip Away, finish second in his first race of 1997."The owner's smiling," Sonny said, as Carolyn approached. "That's always good.""I'm not disappointed," Carolyn said, smiling weakly.
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | February 25, 1995
HALLANDALE, Fla. -- Wallenda, who won more than $1.2 million for the Dogwood Stable, suffered a tear in superficial flexor tendon in his left front ankle and will be retired. The injury was detected by trainer Frank Alexander during a workout this week at Calder Race Course. The 5-year-old son of Gulch ran eighth in his 33rd and last race, the Donn Handicap at Gulfstream Park two weeks ago. Wallenda won stakes at 2, 3 and 4 years old, won seven of his 33 races and ran in the money 17 times.
SPORTS
By James H. Jackson and James H. Jackson,Staff Writer | August 9, 1992
The love affair between the thoroughbred racing industry and the American Championship Racing Series may soon be over.The series was started in 1991 as a way to spark media interest in the coverage of racing, and the first year was a huge success.Nationally televised matchups of star horses like Unbridled, Summer Squall, Festin, Jolie's Halo and Farma Way resulted in record simulcast monies for host tracks.Pimlico Race Course did $6,209,800 for the simulcast of its Pimlico Special; Gulfstream Park did $3,883,881 in simulcast money for its Donn Handicap; Oaklawn Park, $6,307,211 for the Oaklawn Handicap; Santa Anita, $5,007,629 for the Santa Anita Handicap; Hollywood Park, $5,219,078 for the Hollywood Gold Cup; Rockingham Park, $2,192,685 for the New England Classic; and Belmont Park, $3,360,035 for the Nassau County Handicap.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee j | May 11, 1991
The last time a Preakness winner returned to run at Pimlico Race Course was in 1988, when 1987 Preakness winner Alysheba ran in the Pimlico Special.And now Summer Squall is here.But he has had just one sprint since a layoff, and trainer Neil Howard has found himself defending that strategy in the days leading up to today's Pimlico Special.When a horse has been away, conditioning always comes into question. Another factor to consider is the horse's tendency to show more early speed than might otherwise be expected.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 1, 1991
LAUREL -- Considering the Hutcheson Stakes too good to pass up, Laurel Race Course officials have scheduled the first simulcast of the year for tomorrow.The $75,000 Hutcheson, headed by Fly So Free, will be simulcast to Laurel and the Pimlico inter-track outlet from Gulfstream Park in Hallandale, Fla.Maryland's extensive 1991 out-of-town simulcast schedule was not supposed to begin until Feb. 9, with the Donn Handicap from Gulfstream."But the race came up a good one," said Laurel/Pimlico vice president Jim Mango, and the decision was made early yesterday to card the Hutcheson as the final event on a 12-race program.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Staff Writer | February 17, 1993
Laurel Race Course instituted a new plan yesterday designed to provide larger fields for race-goers to bet on.Under a plan announced by Maryland Jockey Club vice president of racing Lenny Hale, minimum eligibility requirements for competing horses were reduced from $5,000 to $4,000, effective with yesterday's card.By reducing the minimum value for horses, it is expected that more horses would be made available for $5,000 claiming events, the bottom rung on the claiming pole."We've been experiencing problems filling the $5,000 claiming races due to the shortage of horses in the region," said Hale.
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