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By J. L. Conklin | December 20, 1990
With a flourish of grand classic style and a nod to tradition, the Donetsk Ballet opened its two-week engagement last night at the Lyric.For those ballet fans who are accustomed to their "Nutcrackers" peppered with the pitter-patter of small feet, the Donetsk's all-adult version is as close to the Petipa original as one can get. And this charming company more than makes up for any lack of childish preciousness.Accompanied by a 48-piece orchestra composed of local musicians under the direction of Mikhail Bank, this version of E. T. A. Hoffmann's story choreographed by Vladimir Shumeikin has several surprises.
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Sports on TV | December 6, 2012
THURSDAY'S TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS M. bask. North Texas@St. Louis (T) FCS10:30 a.m. Ark.-Pine Bluff@Michigan State (T) BIGTEN11 a.m. Belmont@Virginia Commonwealth (T) CSNNoon Stephen F. Austin St.@Texas A&M (T) FCS12:30 Vanderbilt@Xavier ESPNU7:30 Long Beach State@Syracuse ESPN28 W. bask. Texas-San Antonio@TCU (T) FCS8:30 a.m. Denver@Minnesota (T) BIGTEN2 Marquette@Wisconsin (T)
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FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | December 20, 1994
Principal dancers Inna Dorofeyeva and Vadim Pisarev are the soul in the Donetsk Ballet's curious production of "The Nutcracker." On opening night, the couple danced with an accomplishment rarely seen, and their Grand Pas Deux was definitely worth the wait.But this production, with choreography by Evgenia Khasianova and libretto by Yuri Grigorovich, feels very much like a Reader's Digest version of the ballet. The first act is choppy and there isn't a generous flow from the party scene into the mice scene.
NEWS
By Peter Savodnik | January 4, 2005
KIEV, Ukraine - The revolutionaries who are trying to uproot Ukraine's entrenched government and who electrified democracy movements in Russia, Belarus and Moldova are hardly idealists or faithful lap dogs of their liberal-minded president-elect, Viktor A. Yuschenko. Of course, they have ideals and aspirations. Naturally, they believe their new leader - poisoned, pock-marked, widely regarded as intelligent but not very good on the stump - offers hope and the possibility of something new. Still, theirs is a cordoned-off hope, a democratic notion circumscribed by an ugly memory of post-Soviet Ukraine that prohibits most here from investing too much faith or emotion in any one person or government.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | December 19, 1990
What a difference a year -- or, more precisely, 22 months -- has made to the dancers of the Soviet Union's Donetsk Ballet.In February of last year, the Donetsk opened at the Lyric Opera House what was to have been a 15-city tour of the United States. But when the California promoters lost their expected financing, the tour was suspended and the troupe's dancers were stranded here without living expenses for more than a week, with their plight putting them in the national spotlight.Today , the Donetsk returns to the Lyric for a 10-day run of "The Nutcracker," the culmination of a monthlong, four-city tour.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 1, 1991
DONETSK, U.S.S.R. -- They haven't gotten around to tearing down the Lenin monument yet, but the father of Soviet communism has always been overshadowed here anyway -- by a huge black statue of a muscular coal miner, striding forward with a lump of anthracite in his outstretched hand, determined, energetic, uncomplicated.Donetsk is the capital of coal, and it looks it and smells it.It is also the capital of trouble for the Ukrainian politicians in distant Kiev eagerly pushing their republic toward independence, because most of the people of Donetsk and the surrounding Donbass coalfields are Russians, through and through.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Pond | November 29, 1996
KIEV, Ukraine -- Ukraine faces a moment of truth after a prominent politician was gunned down this month. It can either succumb to a descent into political violence, or it can be shocked into resisting such degeneration.The best test of its reaction may well be how fast it accelerates sluggish economic liberalization and gets rid of the cozy insider corruption that Mafia entanglements and feuds thrive on.''This isn't very European, is it?'' asked one Ukrainian official to a colleague after Evehen Shcherban was shot at the Donetsk airport in eastern Ukraine.
NEWS
June 20, 1991
A cultural opportunity worth savingA cultural opportunity has been lost to Baltimore: the reappearance of the Donetsk Ballet which was to have performed at the Lyric Theatre the weekend of May 17, and again in October and December. Unfortunately, the planned series had to be canceled due to low ticket sales.Cancellation of the Donetsk Ballet series means Baltimore has lost the opportunity to see an indigenous Russian ballet company perform three unquestioned masterpieces of Russian dance, and that a long-term relationship between the Donetsk and Baltimore may have been nipped in the bud.Perhaps the aborted association can be rekindled by some consortium of private sector executives, city, county and state governments, the Maryland State Arts Council and dance departments of academe, which could bring the Donetsk back for the enrichment of Baltimore's cultural life.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | May 5, 1991
Since the middle of last month, four members of the acclaimed Donetsk Ballet have been working with dance students at the Baltimore School for the Arts, teaching classes and overseeing rehearsals for a new work choreographed by the Donetsk's Vladimir Shumeiken.The result of this special relationship can be seen by the public Friday to next Sunday when the school presents Mr. Shumeiken's "Waltz, Romance, Waltz" as part of its annual Spring Fever festival of performances and exhibitions.The piece, in three sections, will be performed by Alexander Boitsov and Irina Boitsova of the Donetsk, four School for the Arts graduates who are working with professional dance companies and the school's top students.
SPORTS
Sports on TV | December 6, 2012
THURSDAY'S TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS M. bask. North Texas@St. Louis (T) FCS10:30 a.m. Ark.-Pine Bluff@Michigan State (T) BIGTEN11 a.m. Belmont@Virginia Commonwealth (T) CSNNoon Stephen F. Austin St.@Texas A&M (T) FCS12:30 Vanderbilt@Xavier ESPNU7:30 Long Beach State@Syracuse ESPN28 W. bask. Texas-San Antonio@TCU (T) FCS8:30 a.m. Denver@Minnesota (T) BIGTEN2 Marquette@Wisconsin (T)
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | December 21, 1996
Man is constantly testing his limits. How high can he fly, how fast can he run, how many Swedish meatballs and squares of Monterey Jack cheese can he cram on a small paper plate during happy hour? The parameters are constantly changing.But this holiday season, one reporter undertook the ultimate challenge: How many performances of "The Nutcracker" could one man attend in a single weekend without losing his mind?Each year, more than 2 million people watch the popular Christmas ballet about a young girl (Marie in some versions, Clara in others)
NEWS
By Elizabeth Pond | November 29, 1996
KIEV, Ukraine -- Ukraine faces a moment of truth after a prominent politician was gunned down this month. It can either succumb to a descent into political violence, or it can be shocked into resisting such degeneration.The best test of its reaction may well be how fast it accelerates sluggish economic liberalization and gets rid of the cozy insider corruption that Mafia entanglements and feuds thrive on.''This isn't very European, is it?'' asked one Ukrainian official to a colleague after Evehen Shcherban was shot at the Donetsk airport in eastern Ukraine.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | December 20, 1994
Principal dancers Inna Dorofeyeva and Vadim Pisarev are the soul in the Donetsk Ballet's curious production of "The Nutcracker." On opening night, the couple danced with an accomplishment rarely seen, and their Grand Pas Deux was definitely worth the wait.But this production, with choreography by Evgenia Khasianova and libretto by Yuri Grigorovich, feels very much like a Reader's Digest version of the ballet. The first act is choppy and there isn't a generous flow from the party scene into the mice scene.
FEATURES
By J.L. Conklin and J.L. Conklin,Contributing Writer | December 20, 1993
For years the Russians have been the standard by which other classical ballet companies are measured. The Donetsk Ballet, which opened its run of seven performances of "The Nutcracker" Saturday evening at the Lyric Opera House ably demonstrated what good ballet training is all about -- yet fine technique can carry a performance just so far.Perhaps it was opening night jitters (highly implausible in a company of this stature) -- but for whatever reason the spark was missing. The overall performance of the company, while very technically precise and very attractive, was also very blase.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | December 3, 1993
In "The Nutcracker" ballet, toy soldiers duel with a band of mice. But the stage battle has nothing on a behind-the-scenes brouhaha in Baltimore involving rival import productions of the holiday season confection.Officials of two area productions of "The Nutcracker," including the version by the Moscow Ballet that arrived this week at the Morris Mechanic Theatre, have objected to the tone of advertising for a third production due at the Lyric Opera House later this month.Yet representatives of that production, by the Donetsk Ballet of Ukraine (scheduled Dec. 18-23 at the Lyric)
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 1, 1991
DONETSK, U.S.S.R. -- They haven't gotten around to tearing down the Lenin monument yet, but the father of Soviet communism has always been overshadowed here anyway -- by a huge black statue of a muscular coal miner, striding forward with a lump of anthracite in his outstretched hand, determined, energetic, uncomplicated.Donetsk is the capital of coal, and it looks it and smells it.It is also the capital of trouble for the Ukrainian politicians in distant Kiev eagerly pushing their republic toward independence, because most of the people of Donetsk and the surrounding Donbass coalfields are Russians, through and through.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | December 3, 1993
In "The Nutcracker" ballet, toy soldiers duel with a band of mice. But the stage battle has nothing on a behind-the-scenes brouhaha in Baltimore involving rival import productions of the holiday season confection.Officials of two area productions of "The Nutcracker," including the version by the Moscow Ballet that arrived this week at the Morris Mechanic Theatre, have objected to the tone of advertising for a third production due at the Lyric Opera House later this month.Yet representatives of that production, by the Donetsk Ballet of Ukraine (scheduled Dec. 18-23 at the Lyric)
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | December 21, 1996
Man is constantly testing his limits. How high can he fly, how fast can he run, how many Swedish meatballs and squares of Monterey Jack cheese can he cram on a small paper plate during happy hour? The parameters are constantly changing.But this holiday season, one reporter undertook the ultimate challenge: How many performances of "The Nutcracker" could one man attend in a single weekend without losing his mind?Each year, more than 2 million people watch the popular Christmas ballet about a young girl (Marie in some versions, Clara in others)
NEWS
June 20, 1991
A cultural opportunity worth savingA cultural opportunity has been lost to Baltimore: the reappearance of the Donetsk Ballet which was to have performed at the Lyric Theatre the weekend of May 17, and again in October and December. Unfortunately, the planned series had to be canceled due to low ticket sales.Cancellation of the Donetsk Ballet series means Baltimore has lost the opportunity to see an indigenous Russian ballet company perform three unquestioned masterpieces of Russian dance, and that a long-term relationship between the Donetsk and Baltimore may have been nipped in the bud.Perhaps the aborted association can be rekindled by some consortium of private sector executives, city, county and state governments, the Maryland State Arts Council and dance departments of academe, which could bring the Donetsk back for the enrichment of Baltimore's cultural life.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | May 5, 1991
Since the middle of last month, four members of the acclaimed Donetsk Ballet have been working with dance students at the Baltimore School for the Arts, teaching classes and overseeing rehearsals for a new work choreographed by the Donetsk's Vladimir Shumeiken.The result of this special relationship can be seen by the public Friday to next Sunday when the school presents Mr. Shumeiken's "Waltz, Romance, Waltz" as part of its annual Spring Fever festival of performances and exhibitions.The piece, in three sections, will be performed by Alexander Boitsov and Irina Boitsova of the Donetsk, four School for the Arts graduates who are working with professional dance companies and the school's top students.
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