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Donald Rumsfeld

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NEWS
December 30, 2000
DONALD H. Rumsfeld knows how to be secretary of Defense. He did it a quarter-century ago, healing wounds, restoring capability and confidence after Vietnam. President Ford, suddenly elevated after the resignations in disgrace of Vice President Spiro Agnew and then President Nixon, appointed Mr. Rumsfeld his White House chief of staff. After the transition was a success, he sent him to the Pentagon. This appointment confirms the impression that President-elect George W. Bush is putting the national security side of his administration in seasoned and capable hands whom the nation will trust.
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NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 17, 2008
In Oliver Stone's limp biopic W., George Bush is a washout as a student and a president, and brilliant as a frat boy. Other pledges during rush week cower as upperclassmen "torture" them. W., under duress, recites the names of everyone in the fraternity, nicknames included. Later, when Vice President Dick Cheney sells him on enhanced interrogation techniques, W. reasons that they sound no worse than what he went through at Yale. Although Stone has gone out of his way to say that he has treated Bush as a figure to be understood, not simply pilloried, the movie plays like a dunk-the-clown game at a carnival.
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NEWS
By Letta Tayler and Letta Tayler,Newsday | October 5, 2006
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- His smile tight, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld was a model diplomat during a two-day visit to Nicaragua, gamely climbing a live volcano with his arm in a sling and even refraining from verbal swipes after Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez branded him a "dog of war." The subdued behavior here and during a preceding European trip follows a barrage of negative publicity for the outspoken defense secretary, including a new book that says former White House Chief of Staff Andrew H. Card Jr. twice suggested to President Bush that he consider firing Rumsfeld.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | June 6, 2008
Standard Operating Procedure, Errol Morris' documentary about the crimes against humanity at Abu Ghraib prison in 2003, catalyzes unexpected and often harrowing blends of outrage, sympathy and sorrow. What it doesn't provoke are stock responses of political vengeance. Of course it condemns the higher-ups who escaped blame for encouraging atrocities against Iraqis in the name of American and Iraqi security. But Morris' indictment is even more sweeping. He puts the finger on all of us. He makes us feel complacency implies consent to unjust policies and procedures and to a culture that makes light of degradation.
NEWS
January 4, 2001
IT'S USUALLY conservatives who preach against quotas in the name of diversity, who say racial, ethnic and gender diversity shouldn't count as much as a variety of thoughts and opinions. Yet look at George W. Bush's Cabinet. On the surface, Mr. Bush will have the most diverse senior staff in history -- four women, two black men, two Hispanics, an Asian-American and an Arab-American. But beneath that rich chord of ethnicity and gender lies a conservative political monotone. Few of Mr. Bush's nominees come from the GOP's center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Hinds and Julie Hinds,KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | April 25, 2004
DETROIT - First came the "poetry" of Donald H. Rumsfeld, those oddly lyrical quotes from the defense secretary that were compiled in a book last year. A famous sample: "As we know, there are known knowns. There are things we know we know. We also know there are known unknowns." Honest - Rumsfeld actually said this at a news briefing. Now Bryant Kong has written songs for that poem and six others and released a CD of them. The Poetry of Donald Rumsfeld and Other Fresh American Art Songs is Kong's debut album.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2005
Psychiatrist Lise Van Susteren, a political novice and sister of Fox News television personality Greta Van Susteren, announced her candidacy for the U.S. Senate yesterday, saying she wants to fix the nation's fractured health care system and doesn't think current officeholders are up to the task. "I am not a career politician. I am a citizen fed up with the way the country is headed," Van Susteren, 54, said during a kickoff speech at the American Visionary Art Museum in Baltimore. "While they may be well meaning, I have lost confidence that the professional politicians can turn things around," she said.
NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | December 12, 2004
THE ARROGANCE of the Bush administration in so much of what it says and does is supposed to be a factor in the feelings of distrust and outright hatred that many foreigners have for America these days. But Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld demonstrated last week that arrogance isn't just for foreigners like those Old Europeans. Mr. Rumsfeld can dish it out to his own troops serving in the fraudulently ordered, misguided and mismanaged war and occupation in Iraq. The secretary got a little taste of American freedom of expression Wednesday when he visited some of those U.S. troops in Kuwait, where they were waiting to serve in Iraq.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 23, 2004
By decreasing the amount of time a single executive, manager or VIP signs his name by just 15 minutes a day, a signature machine can pay for itself in just a short time. - Advertisement for machine that does 3,000 autographs a day "without writer's cramp" BOSTON - I remember when Donald H. Rumsfeld was dubbed a "virtual rock star" by CNN. People magazine named him one of the sexiest men of the year. Fox News said he was a "babe magnet." If, as Henry A. Kissinger said, power is the ultimate aphrodisiac, the media fell in love with the Pentagon chief and his blunt talk.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 20, 2001
WASHINGTON - Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld has interviewed at least two high-profile retired military men as well as top active-duty officers in his search to replace Army Gen. Henry "Hugh" Shelton when he steps down as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in September, Pentagon officials said. If Rumsfeld recommends a retiree, and President Bush goes along with the suggestion, it would be the first time the post has been filled by calling a retired officer back to active duty.
NEWS
By Letta Tayler and Letta Tayler,Newsday | October 5, 2006
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- His smile tight, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld was a model diplomat during a two-day visit to Nicaragua, gamely climbing a live volcano with his arm in a sling and even refraining from verbal swipes after Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez branded him a "dog of war." The subdued behavior here and during a preceding European trip follows a barrage of negative publicity for the outspoken defense secretary, including a new book that says former White House Chief of Staff Andrew H. Card Jr. twice suggested to President Bush that he consider firing Rumsfeld.
NEWS
By G. JEFFERSON PRICE III | November 22, 2005
In the cacophony over Iraq last week, Stephen J. Hadley, President Bush's national security adviser, gave a remarkable explanation of the administration's reaction to Democratic Rep. John P. Murtha's demand for the withdrawal of U. S. troops from Iraq. "We do not see how an immediate pullout contributes to winning the war on terror, bringing stability to Iraq, how it makes America, the United States, more secure. It doesn't seem to achieve any of the objectives that we have." To which the Pennsylvania congressman might have responded: The invasion and occupation of Iraq have not contributed to winning the war on terror; they distracted from it. The invasion and occupation of Iraq have not brought stability to that land; they have de-stabilized Iraq, created the conditions for a prolonged civil war and created an environment in which terrorists now thrive.
NEWS
By CHRIS GUY and CHRIS GUY,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2005
ST. MICHAELS -- So that might have been the secretary of defense who just strolled by with a security detail following at a discreet distance. It might even have been the vice president of the United States out shopping or dining along Talbot Street, the main drag in this 300-year-old Eastern Shore village. Most likely, it was a foursome of friends - Donald Rumsfeld and Dick Cheney and their wives - enjoying an outing during a weekend getaway at the waterfront second homes the couples have bought just two miles apart on the outskirts of town.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2005
Psychiatrist Lise Van Susteren, a political novice and sister of Fox News television personality Greta Van Susteren, announced her candidacy for the U.S. Senate yesterday, saying she wants to fix the nation's fractured health care system and doesn't think current officeholders are up to the task. "I am not a career politician. I am a citizen fed up with the way the country is headed," Van Susteren, 54, said during a kickoff speech at the American Visionary Art Museum in Baltimore. "While they may be well meaning, I have lost confidence that the professional politicians can turn things around," she said.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 23, 2004
By decreasing the amount of time a single executive, manager or VIP signs his name by just 15 minutes a day, a signature machine can pay for itself in just a short time. - Advertisement for machine that does 3,000 autographs a day "without writer's cramp" BOSTON - I remember when Donald H. Rumsfeld was dubbed a "virtual rock star" by CNN. People magazine named him one of the sexiest men of the year. Fox News said he was a "babe magnet." If, as Henry A. Kissinger said, power is the ultimate aphrodisiac, the media fell in love with the Pentagon chief and his blunt talk.
NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | December 12, 2004
THE ARROGANCE of the Bush administration in so much of what it says and does is supposed to be a factor in the feelings of distrust and outright hatred that many foreigners have for America these days. But Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld demonstrated last week that arrogance isn't just for foreigners like those Old Europeans. Mr. Rumsfeld can dish it out to his own troops serving in the fraudulently ordered, misguided and mismanaged war and occupation in Iraq. The secretary got a little taste of American freedom of expression Wednesday when he visited some of those U.S. troops in Kuwait, where they were waiting to serve in Iraq.
NEWS
By G. JEFFERSON PRICE III | November 22, 2005
In the cacophony over Iraq last week, Stephen J. Hadley, President Bush's national security adviser, gave a remarkable explanation of the administration's reaction to Democratic Rep. John P. Murtha's demand for the withdrawal of U. S. troops from Iraq. "We do not see how an immediate pullout contributes to winning the war on terror, bringing stability to Iraq, how it makes America, the United States, more secure. It doesn't seem to achieve any of the objectives that we have." To which the Pennsylvania congressman might have responded: The invasion and occupation of Iraq have not contributed to winning the war on terror; they distracted from it. The invasion and occupation of Iraq have not brought stability to that land; they have de-stabilized Iraq, created the conditions for a prolonged civil war and created an environment in which terrorists now thrive.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | June 6, 2008
Standard Operating Procedure, Errol Morris' documentary about the crimes against humanity at Abu Ghraib prison in 2003, catalyzes unexpected and often harrowing blends of outrage, sympathy and sorrow. What it doesn't provoke are stock responses of political vengeance. Of course it condemns the higher-ups who escaped blame for encouraging atrocities against Iraqis in the name of American and Iraqi security. But Morris' indictment is even more sweeping. He puts the finger on all of us. He makes us feel complacency implies consent to unjust policies and procedures and to a culture that makes light of degradation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Hinds and Julie Hinds,KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | April 25, 2004
DETROIT - First came the "poetry" of Donald H. Rumsfeld, those oddly lyrical quotes from the defense secretary that were compiled in a book last year. A famous sample: "As we know, there are known knowns. There are things we know we know. We also know there are known unknowns." Honest - Rumsfeld actually said this at a news briefing. Now Bryant Kong has written songs for that poem and six others and released a CD of them. The Poetry of Donald Rumsfeld and Other Fresh American Art Songs is Kong's debut album.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 11, 2002
WASHINGTON - Thirteen days after the Sept. 11 attacks, the Kennedy Center presented a Concert for America in an attempt to honor the victims and provide some comfort to all who mourned them. The event, with first lady Laura Bush and Sen. Edward Kennedy as co-costs and a cross-section of classical and pop talent performing deeply meaningful music, seemed to come about almost spontaneously, like so many other gestures of solidarity during that awful, immediate aftermath. A year later, a second Concert for America - a gathering "to remember and mourn, to honor and celebrate" - was taped Monday at the Kennedy Center.
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