Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDonald Fehr
IN THE NEWS

Donald Fehr

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2002
NEW YORK - Every time baseball engages in a labor dispute, somebody trots out this line: Major League Baseball has nothing to fear but Fehr himself. That would be Major League Baseball Players Association executive director Donald Fehr, who - if he really cared - could note that the correct pronunciation of his surname is just as close to "fair" as "fear." But he doesn't care. Fehr has been cast as the villain in every baseball labor dispute since he assumed the leadership role in the strongest, richest union in professional sports in 1983.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
The timing of Bud Selig's pre-retirement news conference at Camden Yards Tuesday was delicious. It was 20 years to the day after major league players walked out and initiated the most disastrous labor showdown in baseball history. The great work stoppage of 1994-95 turned the fans against both the players and owners, and the owner with the biggest target on his back was the acting commissioner, who would eventually become the permanent commissioner and run Major League Baseball for a total of 22 years.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Dallas Morning News | May 19, 1994
NEW YORK-- Major-league owners didn't make a contract proposal to the players union in a meeting yesterday that did nothing to lessen the possibility of a late-season strike.This was the third meeting since March between the two sides, who have yet to do more than exchange preliminary financial information.The sides scheduled another meeting Monday in Los Angeles, but it is expected to be next month, at the earliest, before owners make their formal proposal for a new salary compensation system that will include a salary cap to trigger revenue sharing.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2005
Major league baseball players who fail steroid drug tests no longer will have the option of being fined instead of suspended, baseball's labor lawyer said yesterday. Fines that ranged from $10,000 for a first failed drug test to up to $100,000 after the fourth infraction will be eliminated, according to Rob Manfred, baseball's executive vice president for labor relations. "We do have an agreement with [union head Donald Fehr] that the language after the disjunctive in the various disciplinary levels is going to be eliminated," Manfred told the Associated Press yesterday.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2002
The Major League Baseball Players Association has yet to respond to an ownership concession on revenue sharing, but management lawyer Rob Manfred expressed guarded optimism yesterday that the negotiations are headed in the right direction. "I'm more optimistic about it moving forward," he said, after reporting progress on several lesser issues. "We had a better day today." The owners and players have one week left to reach a new labor agreement before the Aug. 30 strike date set by the players a week ago. They remain $43 million apart on the revenue-sharing component after the owners reduced the amount they hope to transfer through revenue sharing to $268 million.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1994
CINCINNATI -- Opening Day in Mexico City?It won't happen until 1998 if it ever happens. But major-league owners left open the possibility yesterday that the next round of baseball expansion could include the first team in Mexico.John Harrington, chairman of the expansion committee, said this week's meeting of club owners produced no decision on whether to go ahead with another round of expansion. But Harrington, a Boston Red Sox owner, said the committee is inviting any interested cities in North America to submit information.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | April 3, 1995
Donald Fehr -- Embattled union director lands on his feet and bolsters credibility with his membership. No salary cap. No tax plan (yet!). No significant players crossed the picket lines. Under the circumstances, it doesn't get any better than this.Peter Angelos -- Renegade Orioles owner became a baseball cult hero by refusing to use replacement players and calling every wrong-headed move by the owners in advance. Called ownership's hard-line bargaining approach "mass economic suicide." Nearly $900 million in revenue losses later, he turned out to be right.
SPORTS
May 19, 1994
Joe Garagiola has spent his life in baseball as a player, announcer and sports commenta- tor for NBC's "Today." Recently, he has spearheaded the efforts of the Baseball Assistance Team, a nonprofit group that offers financial support to ex-players and other baseball officials. Garagiola talked about the cause with The Sun's Mark Hyman.Q: Who does BAT help?A: Players, of course. But not only players. We recently changed our bylaws to take care of umpires, front-office personnel, scouts, widows, Negro League players.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | October 7, 1994
Coming soon in these pages . . .* Oct. 18: Yogi Berra becomes the 13th candidate to interview with the Orioles for their vacant manager's job."We want to make sure we don't leave anyone out," general manager Roland Hemond says.Berra, 69, who hasn't managed in nine years, is philosophical."I don't understand why they called me," he says, "but it makes sense."* Oct. 22: Peter Angelos eats breakfast in New York with Donald Fehr, flies to Los Angeles for lunch with Georgia Frontiere, then flies to Washington for a working dinner with State Department officials assigned to the Haiti crisis.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | February 7, 1995
As usual, President Clinton had no idea what he was getting into.His chances of passing health care reform were better than his chances of settling the baseball strike.It just gets worse and worse for the Prez.First, the Democratic Congress.Then, the Republican Congress.Now, these idiots.Heck, Newt Gingrich and Bob Dole are puppy dogs compared to Bud Selig, Donald Fehr and the rest of the blockheads ruining major-league baseball.Clinton figured he'd do the right thing, rise above the political fray, make everyone happy.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2004
WASHINGTON - Donald Fehr, chief of the Major League Baseball Players Association, defended his union's stance on drug testing during a congressional hearing yesterday, even as Sen. John McCain threatened to legislate solutions for doping. One of several sports leaders appearing before the Senate Commerce Committee headed by McCain, Fehr said baseball players shouldn't be prohibited from using products legally available to the public and challenged Congress to ban performance-enhancing substances such as androstenedione.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2002
NEW YORK - Every time baseball engages in a labor dispute, somebody trots out this line: Major League Baseball has nothing to fear but Fehr himself. That would be Major League Baseball Players Association executive director Donald Fehr, who - if he really cared - could note that the correct pronunciation of his surname is just as close to "fair" as "fear." But he doesn't care. Fehr has been cast as the villain in every baseball labor dispute since he assumed the leadership role in the strongest, richest union in professional sports in 1983.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2002
The Major League Baseball Players Association has yet to respond to an ownership concession on revenue sharing, but management lawyer Rob Manfred expressed guarded optimism yesterday that the negotiations are headed in the right direction. "I'm more optimistic about it moving forward," he said, after reporting progress on several lesser issues. "We had a better day today." The owners and players have one week left to reach a new labor agreement before the Aug. 30 strike date set by the players a week ago. They remain $43 million apart on the revenue-sharing component after the owners reduced the amount they hope to transfer through revenue sharing to $268 million.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | December 6, 1995
So, the news is out: The editors at Sports Illustrated have named Cal Ripken their Sportsman of the Year, to be recognized in next week's issue.It's indisputably big news for one of Bawlmer's own, a rare and significant honor that will only add to Ripken's legend.But who else was SI going to pick, Don King?Bud Selig?Art Modell?As much as Ripken is obviously deserving of the honor for breaking Lou Gehrig's consecutive-games record and playing in 2,153 straight games -- "maybe the greatest athletic achievement of our lifetime," Mike Mussina called it -- the rest of the sports world didn't offer much competition in 1995.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | April 3, 1995
Donald Fehr -- Embattled union director lands on his feet and bolsters credibility with his membership. No salary cap. No tax plan (yet!). No significant players crossed the picket lines. Under the circumstances, it doesn't get any better than this.Peter Angelos -- Renegade Orioles owner became a baseball cult hero by refusing to use replacement players and calling every wrong-headed move by the owners in advance. Called ownership's hard-line bargaining approach "mass economic suicide." Nearly $900 million in revenue losses later, he turned out to be right.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | February 11, 1995
And now, a word from a starving union man:"Lenny Dykstra loves baseball. Lenny Dykstra is fortunate to be playing in the major leagues. Lenny Dykstra wants to play baseball in 1995."Lenny Dykstra is a dope, but never mind.He's a big-leaguer in the '90s. He speaks in the third person. He acts dumb and dumber. And he quite enjoys the lifestyle of the rich and famous, thank you very much.The picket line?It's just something for Lenny to blast through in his sports car come April.Lenny, Jose Canseco or one of the other oppressed laborers.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2005
Major league baseball players who fail steroid drug tests no longer will have the option of being fined instead of suspended, baseball's labor lawyer said yesterday. Fines that ranged from $10,000 for a first failed drug test to up to $100,000 after the fourth infraction will be eliminated, according to Rob Manfred, baseball's executive vice president for labor relations. "We do have an agreement with [union head Donald Fehr] that the language after the disjunctive in the various disciplinary levels is going to be eliminated," Manfred told the Associated Press yesterday.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | February 7, 1995
As usual, President Clinton had no idea what he was getting into.His chances of passing health care reform were better than his chances of settling the baseball strike.It just gets worse and worse for the Prez.First, the Democratic Congress.Then, the Republican Congress.Now, these idiots.Heck, Newt Gingrich and Bob Dole are puppy dogs compared to Bud Selig, Donald Fehr and the rest of the blockheads ruining major-league baseball.Clinton figured he'd do the right thing, rise above the political fray, make everyone happy.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | October 7, 1994
NEW YORK -- Ever since the NBA agreed to a salary cap in 1983 and went on to grand success, owners in every other major team sport have eyed the concept with longing.Now, circumstances have brought Major League Baseball and the NHL to the same point at the same time. And at least one person says that may have been the plan."I think, in some demented fashion, Bob Goodenow and Donald Fehr want to bring pro sports to their knees," Washington Capitals general manager David Poile said when he heard that the players had rejected two of the owners' proposals Wednesday.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.