Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDon Juan
IN THE NEWS

Don Juan

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 7, 1998
Fell's Point Corner Theatre, whose 1996 production of David Ives' "All in the Timing" was one of the highlights of the season, brings another offbeat Ives comedy to Baltimore tomorrow when "Don Juan in Chicago" makes its local premiere.Re-interpreting the legend of Don Juan, Ives sets the first act of his comedy in 16th century Spain and the second in modern-day Chicago. Lili Liang directs a cast headed by Richard Dean Stover as Don Juan and Richard Peck as his sidekick, Leporello. Kara Jackson and Allyson Rosen will alternate in the role of Don Juan's devoted Dona Elvira.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
Laurence "Larry" O'Dwyer, who delighted Center Stage audiences with his theatrical irreverence and memorable performances, died of cancer Feb. 28 at his home in Knox City, Texas. The former Mount Vernon resident was 77. A local favorite, he was often greeted with applause when he stepped on a stage. He was the 2009 recipient of a Helen Hayes Award for his role in "The Fantasticks. " He was recalled for his eye-catching costumes and the red tennis shoes he wore in "A Midsummer Night's Dream.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 8, 1999
"I tried to see it myself once and nearly died of it," George Bernard Shaw said of his play, "Man and Superman." A tough work to produce -- though definitely one of Shaw's best -- the four-act comedy is often staged without its lengthy third-act dream sequence.That sequence, which goes by the title, "Don Juan in Hell," has frequently been staged alone, perhaps most famously in a production that toured for two years in the early 1950s starring Charles Boyer, Charles Laughton, Cedric Hardwicke and Agnes Moorehead.
TRAVEL
July 29, 2007
BEACH READS Summer from cover to cover Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is the summer's biggest-selling book, but there are a few other titles perfect for relaxing in the sun: LOVE STORIES The Lost Diary of Don Juan (Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group). This fictional story by Doug Abrams is about a book editor who discovers the real-life diary of the world's most famous lover, written in Seville in 1593 and hidden until now. Loving Frank (Ballantine Books). Nancy Horan's highly anticipated book gives a fictional account of a love affair between Frank Lloyd Wright and Mamah Borthwick Cheney.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 8, 1995
Don Juan. You know the guy: Mr. Love-'em-and-leave-'em. The ultimate lothario. Lust incarnate. The master of the one-night stand. But what happens when this theatrical character falls into the hands of an alm" is how dramaturg Catherine Sheehy describes it. But at the same time, Sheehy, an assistant professor at the Yale School of Drama, insists, "[Director Irene] Lewis is not interested in bashing Don Juan. This is not Irene's revenge. It's not suffrage. It's really art."The art she's referring to is Moliere's "Don Juan," one of the 17th-century French playwright's rarely produced scripts, which opens the season at Center Stage Wednesday.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 21, 1999
From the amorous adventures of the Greek god Zeus to the alleged exploits of the current president of the United States, the Seducer has always captured the imagination of the public. But if one had to elect history's greatest seducer, no candidate could compete with Don Juan -- who also happens to be the subject of the greatest opera ever written, Mozart's "Don Giovanni."In the Mozart opera, which will be performed tonight in the Lyric Opera House as the first production in the Baltimore Opera Company's current season, Don Giovanni's servant, Leporello, keeps a record of his master's conquests.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 19, 2000
A few hours after Thursday's news leak about the special prosecutor in Washington preparing a new probe into the president's affair with a young intern, a high-ranking, smooth-talking, truth-bending libertine was being relentlessly pursued a few miles away by forces of virtue and justice and, finally, confronted with a hellish punishment. Hmmmm. Was there a lesson in this? Was it merely coincidence? Another vast right-wing political conspiracy? Just another entertaining night at the opera, really.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 13, 1995
In seeing Center Stage's production of Moliere's "Don Juan," it helps to know that the role the playwright wrote for himself wasn't the title character, but his servant, Sganarelle. This loyal but skeptical sidethe amoral, sacrilegious, hedonistic Don Juan.Therefore, though J. Kenneth Campbell's portrayal of Don Juan isn't always compelling, the production is largely redeemed by Robert Dorfman's expressive Sganarelle.Dorfman is a trained clown, and, in the role of this increasingly frustrated character, director Irene Lewis has given him an excellent opportunity to display his comedic talents.
NEWS
June 20, 1998
Carlos Castaneda,a godfather of the New Age movement whose best-selling books claimed to relate the ancient mystical secrets of an Indian shaman, died of liver cancer April 27 in Los Angeles, it was announced this week. He was believed to be 72.For more than 30 years, Castaneda said he had been the apprentice of a Yaqui Indian sorcerer named Don Juan Matus. He had millions of followers around the world, and his 10 books continue to sell in 17 languages.Mr. Castaneda, who held a 1973 Ph.D.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 12, 1992
Doug Elkins company featured in seriesThe New York-based Doug Elkins Dance Company will perform Friday and Saturday nights at 8 as part of the Dance on the Edge series in Towson State University's Stephens Hall. The company's unique style blends modern dance, break dance, martial arts, ballet and clowning.The audience is invited to engage in a post-performance xTC discussion with the artists after each of the shows. Tickets are $9 to $14. Call (410) 830-3369. Doug Elkins will teach a contemporary dance master class for intermediate and advanced students on Saturday; call (410)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Clarinda Harriss and By Clarinda Harriss,Special to the Sun | July 1, 2001
"Bloodlines," by Fred D'Aguiar. The Overlook Press. 161 pages, $24.95. Fred D'Aguiar's novel-in-verse, "Bloodlines" is a brilliant venture that almost succeeds. It takes the reader on a wild voyage tossed by love, sex and violence; it's funny, satirical, serious. It's like a documentary done in Errol Flynn-movie style. It can be so poignant the reader aches -- or so off-the-mark the reader cringes. The big risk, obviously, is writing an "issues" novel -- "Bloodlines" tackles the consequences of U.S. slavery -- in verse: strict ottava rima (each stanza consisting of eight iambic pentameter lines end-rhymed abababcc)
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 19, 2000
A few hours after Thursday's news leak about the special prosecutor in Washington preparing a new probe into the president's affair with a young intern, a high-ranking, smooth-talking, truth-bending libertine was being relentlessly pursued a few miles away by forces of virtue and justice and, finally, confronted with a hellish punishment. Hmmmm. Was there a lesson in this? Was it merely coincidence? Another vast right-wing political conspiracy? Just another entertaining night at the opera, really.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 8, 1999
"I tried to see it myself once and nearly died of it," George Bernard Shaw said of his play, "Man and Superman." A tough work to produce -- though definitely one of Shaw's best -- the four-act comedy is often staged without its lengthy third-act dream sequence.That sequence, which goes by the title, "Don Juan in Hell," has frequently been staged alone, perhaps most famously in a production that toured for two years in the early 1950s starring Charles Boyer, Charles Laughton, Cedric Hardwicke and Agnes Moorehead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | October 28, 1999
Music and Dance in Colonial MarylandMaryland's history is brought to life through music and dance when Towson University's Early Music Ensemble and Goucher College's Choregraphie Antique present "Music and Dance in Colonial Maryland" at 3 p.m. Sunday in Towson University's Center for the Arts Concert Hall, Osler and Cross Campus drives. Admission is free. Call 410-830-2787.'Spirit'The power of contemporary music, the wisdom of ancient culture and the energy of more than 60 performers are combined to make the spirit soar Tuesday through Nov. 7 at the Lyric Opera House, 140 W. Mount Royal Ave. Hours for "Spirit -- A Journey in Dance, Drums and Songs" are 8 p.m. Tuesday through Nov. 6; 2 p.m. Nov. 6-7; and 7:30 p.m. Nov. 7. Ticket prices for the multicultural rock and dance spectacular range from $15 to $49. Call 410-481-SEAT.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 21, 1999
From the amorous adventures of the Greek god Zeus to the alleged exploits of the current president of the United States, the Seducer has always captured the imagination of the public. But if one had to elect history's greatest seducer, no candidate could compete with Don Juan -- who also happens to be the subject of the greatest opera ever written, Mozart's "Don Giovanni."In the Mozart opera, which will be performed tonight in the Lyric Opera House as the first production in the Baltimore Opera Company's current season, Don Giovanni's servant, Leporello, keeps a record of his master's conquests.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 17, 1999
It appears to be Pushkin season in Baltimore. Tchaikovsky's "Eugene Onegin," based on Alexander Pushkin's verse novel, is being performed by the Baltimore Opera Company, and a block away, at the Theatre Project, Pushkin-philes can see the great Russian writer's "The Little Tragedies" performed by the Stanislavsky Theatre Studio.Based in Silver Spring, the troupe was founded in 1997 by theater artists who emigrated from the former Soviet Union. The company has a movement-oriented approach, which ties in nicely with the dream-or-nightmare quality of the four short pieces that make up "The Little Tragedies."
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | April 12, 1993
Paris -- Don Juan de Borbon, father of Spain's King Juan Carlos, was buried last week in El Escorial, near Madrid. The occasion was one which gave evidence of the healing power of historical time.Don Juan was the son of Alfonso XIII, the constitutional monarch who went into exile in 1931, after having collaborated with Gen. Miguel Primo de Rivera, the dictator put in power in a bloodless military revolt in 1923. The dictatorship was not a success.The constitutional regime it replaced had been little more successful.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 17, 1999
It appears to be Pushkin season in Baltimore. Tchaikovsky's "Eugene Onegin," based on Alexander Pushkin's verse novel, is being performed by the Baltimore Opera Company, and a block away, at the Theatre Project, Pushkin-philes can see the great Russian writer's "The Little Tragedies" performed by the Stanislavsky Theatre Studio.Based in Silver Spring, the troupe was founded in 1997 by theater artists who emigrated from the former Soviet Union. The company has a movement-oriented approach, which ties in nicely with the dream-or-nightmare quality of the four short pieces that make up "The Little Tragedies."
NEWS
June 20, 1998
Carlos Castaneda,a godfather of the New Age movement whose best-selling books claimed to relate the ancient mystical secrets of an Indian shaman, died of liver cancer April 27 in Los Angeles, it was announced this week. He was believed to be 72.For more than 30 years, Castaneda said he had been the apprentice of a Yaqui Indian sorcerer named Don Juan Matus. He had millions of followers around the world, and his 10 books continue to sell in 17 languages.Mr. Castaneda, who held a 1973 Ph.D.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 7, 1998
Fell's Point Corner Theatre, whose 1996 production of David Ives' "All in the Timing" was one of the highlights of the season, brings another offbeat Ives comedy to Baltimore tomorrow when "Don Juan in Chicago" makes its local premiere.Re-interpreting the legend of Don Juan, Ives sets the first act of his comedy in 16th century Spain and the second in modern-day Chicago. Lili Liang directs a cast headed by Richard Dean Stover as Don Juan and Richard Peck as his sidekick, Leporello. Kara Jackson and Allyson Rosen will alternate in the role of Don Juan's devoted Dona Elvira.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.