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Don Giovanni

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By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2010
Among composers, only Mozart had the courage and genius to write an opera, "Don Giovanni," defining a libertine relishing his conquests (until ultimately suffering a fearsome fate). Displaying his own courageous creativity, J. Ernest Green, music director of Live Arts Maryland, brought his new stage version of the opera to Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts for two performances. Prefacing the title with "A day in the life, loves and death of," Green lent a fresh view to what is often described as Mozart's greatest opera.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
The words "opera" and "emotional" typically go together, but not in the way it will happen this weekend. The risk-taking Baltimore- and New York-based ensemble known as Rhymes With Opera, now in its sixth year, will premiere the complete version of Thomas Limbert's "Numbers/Dates. " It's a work that uses a text based on just that - numbers and dates. The performers supply the emotion. "The piece was born out of a neurobiology class I took at Duke University," Limbert said, "about speech perception and research on 'emotional prosody.' We heard sound samples of actors speaking semantically neutral numbers and dates in different emotions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | March 10, 2002
Opera is everywhere this week. In addition to Baltimore Opera Company and Peabody Opera Theatre, Annapolis Opera is in full swing, offering Mozart's ever-popular Don Giovanni. One of three masterful collaborations between Mozart and librettist Lorenzo Da Ponte, the opera provides a dynamic portrait of Don Juan. He never really gets a chance to do the nasty in the opera, for someone is always thwarting him at the last minute, but his trail of female destruction is still very much a part of the picture.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2010
Among composers, only Mozart had the courage and genius to write an opera, "Don Giovanni," defining a libertine relishing his conquests (until ultimately suffering a fearsome fate). Displaying his own courageous creativity, J. Ernest Green, music director of Live Arts Maryland, brought his new stage version of the opera to Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts for two performances. Prefacing the title with "A day in the life, loves and death of," Green lent a fresh view to what is often described as Mozart's greatest opera.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff | October 30, 1990
The master rake, Don Giovanni, gets his just rewards again in the end but not before Mozart's ravishing music flows from the Metropolitan Opera tomorrow when the new Franco Zeffirelli production is shown from 8 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67.Videotaped last April, "Don Giovanni" features Samuel Ramey, bass, in the title role with James Levine conducting the 1787 opera. Also singing, in order of appearance, are bass Ferruccio Furlanetto as Leporello; soprano Carol Vaness as Donna Anna; bass Kurt Moll as Commendatore; tenor Jerry Hadley as Don Ottavio; soprano Karita Mattila as Donna Elvira; soprano Dawn Upshaw as Zerlina and bass Philip Cokorinos as Masetto.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 1, 2002
It's fun being bad. That explains an awful lot of behavior by kids and adults alike. The ones who never get some perspective knocked into them can end up like the dissolute antihero of Mozart's Don Giovanni - so addicted to the pursuit of pleasure that they never notice the final comeuppance heading their way. It's also fun watching people be bad. That explains an awful lot of television - and the enduring draw of Don Giovanni, receiving a lively production...
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 19, 1997
Mozart, "Don Giovanni," performed by Bryn Terfel (Don Giovanni), Renee Fleming (Donna Anna), Ann Murray (Donna Elvira), Monica Groop (Zerlina), Herbert Lippert (Don Ottavio), Michele Pertusi (Leporello), Roberto Scaltriti (Masetto), Mario Luperi (Commendatore) and the London Philharmonic, Georg Solti conducting (London 455 500-2).This "Giovanni," recorded live in London last year, is almost certainly the last Mozart opera we will be getting from Georg Solti, who died in September. It is with a certain amount of sadness -- and some bewilderment -- that I have to report that it is disappointing.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 19, 2000
A few hours after Thursday's news leak about the special prosecutor in Washington preparing a new probe into the president's affair with a young intern, a high-ranking, smooth-talking, truth-bending libertine was being relentlessly pursued a few miles away by forces of virtue and justice and, finally, confronted with a hellish punishment. Hmmmm. Was there a lesson in this? Was it merely coincidence? Another vast right-wing political conspiracy? Just another entertaining night at the opera, really.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 21, 1999
From the amorous adventures of the Greek god Zeus to the alleged exploits of the current president of the United States, the Seducer has always captured the imagination of the public. But if one had to elect history's greatest seducer, no candidate could compete with Don Juan -- who also happens to be the subject of the greatest opera ever written, Mozart's "Don Giovanni."In the Mozart opera, which will be performed tonight in the Lyric Opera House as the first production in the Baltimore Opera Company's current season, Don Giovanni's servant, Leporello, keeps a record of his master's conquests.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and By Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 20, 2001
"I like an aria to fit a singer as perfectly as a well-tailored suit of clothes," said a 22-year-old Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Mozart's flair for vocal fashion was on display at the St. John's College Great Hall this week, when the Annapolis Opera presented a quartet of talented young singers in a program of excerpts from some of Mozart's greatest works for the musical stage. The Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni, The Magic Flute and the less famous but still wonderful Abduction from the Seraglio were the opera scores represented, along with the chirpy "Alleluia" from Mozart's most famous motet, Exsultate, jubilate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | October 2, 2008
Bad guys in the movies and on TV might spill more blood and use fouler language, but they've still got nothing on Don Giovanni, the original amoral machine who propels one of the greatest operas in the repertoire. Mozart's immortalization of the irresistible antihero, as contemptuous of heaven's judgment as of hell's, has been given a stylish update by Opera Vivente. This entertaining Don Giovanni is set in what appears to be 1940s or '50s America, a transition that works neatly enough.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2008
POP MUSIC Raphael Saadiq Saadiq has written and produced hits for the likes of Mary J. Blige and Erykah Badu. In the '90s, the Grammy winner was a part of the hit urban group Tony! Toni! Tone! He just released his third solo effort, The Way I See It, which revisits vintage Motown and Chicago-style R&B, circa the early '60s. See him at 8 p.m. Sunday at Black Cat, 1811 14th St. N.W., Washington. Tickets are $28. Call 410-547-7328 or go to ticketmaster.com. Rashod D.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | January 11, 2007
Washington National Opera's 52nd season will include such favorites as Mozart's Don Giovanni and Puccini's La Boheme, along with the local premiere of a major contemporary opera and Placido Domingo's first U.S. appearance in a Handel work. Missing from the 2007-2008 lineup, announced yesterday at the Library of Congress, is Wagner's Siegfried, the third installment in the company's new staging of Wagner's Ring. But Domingo, the famed tenor and occasional conductor who is also the company's general director, said yesterday, "We are going to finish the Ring as we promised.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | December 8, 2006
Founded at the Charles Carroll House in 1993, Annapolis Opera's holiday tradition, Mozart by Candlelight has grown lovelier since moving to the historic First Presbyterian Church of Annapolis in 2003. The candlelit setting and acoustics of the church, built as a theater in 1828, make it an ideal location for the concert. For the near-capacity audience of 390 on Sunday, there seemed a glow marking the end of the worldwide 250th birthday celebrations of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Ronald J. Gretz, the Annapolis Opera's artistic and music director, reminded everyone of Mozart's legacy, noting that only three of the evening's selections had been heard in past Mozart concerts he'd arranged.
TRAVEL
By JEFFREY DAY and JEFFREY DAY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2006
THE SPOLETO FESTIVAL USA and Charleston, S.C., were made for each other. One offers art; the other is art. The city creates a magical atmosphere for festival-goers. When one leaves a production of Wolfgang Mozart's Don Giovanni, he or she isn't slammed back into the 21st century. It's more like a walk through time. Giant live oaks and walls of fragrant oleander shelter sidewalks. Brick walls sprout resurrection fern. Stucco flakes from the walls of 250-year-old buildings. Horse hooves click and carriage wheels rumble.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 28, 2005
The elegantly regilded Hippodrome Theatre could be mistaken for an old-world opera house. On Wednesday night, for three hours at least, that's exactly what it was. Teatro Lirico D'Europa - administratively based in Hunt Valley - presented a fully staged production of Don Giovanni that offered sufficient entertainment value and demonstrated the theater's flexibility. The entertainment usually booked at this renovated vaudeville and movie house is amplified, so it was fascinating to hear the natural acoustics there.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1999
Florence Kirk Keppel, a lyric soprano who went from New York's Metropolitan Opera to teaching and performing in Carroll County, died Sunday of Alzheimer's disease at Carroll Lutheran Village in Westminster.Mrs. Keppel, who sang under her maiden name, Florence Kirk, had lived in Carroll County since 1954. She was 90.She was raised in Philadelphia's Germantown, earned a bachelor's degree in music and education from the University of Pennsylvania in 1931 and studied operatic performance at Philadelphia's Curtis Institute of Music.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 14, 2002
Music in the Capital City will be heading straight to hell this weekend. And to the upper reaches of heaven as well. Tomorrow evening and Sunday afternoon at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, murder will be committed, maidens seduced and corpses resurrected as vengeful statues when the Annapolis Opera presents Mozart's Don Giovanni. In the end, the lecherous Don Giovanni - who, according to his servant Leporello has romanced some 2,065 women, including 1,003 in his native Spain - will be dragged to the gates of hell by an entire cast bent on moral vengeance.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 3, 2003
Wickedness," the ever-quotable Oscar Wilde wrote, "is a myth invented by good people to account for the curious attractiveness of others." That certainly applies to the legend of Don Juan, especially as brought to life operatically by Mozart in Don Giovanni. A thoroughly wicked fellow, to be sure, this shameless sex addict, but awfully appealing, too. Even some of his conquests can't get over the spell he casts. No wonder the Victorians (and some pre- and post-Victorians) had trouble dealing with this opera, which spends more time building up the "curious attractiveness" of the villain than on dispensing his just desserts.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 1, 2002
It's fun being bad. That explains an awful lot of behavior by kids and adults alike. The ones who never get some perspective knocked into them can end up like the dissolute antihero of Mozart's Don Giovanni - so addicted to the pursuit of pleasure that they never notice the final comeuppance heading their way. It's also fun watching people be bad. That explains an awful lot of television - and the enduring draw of Don Giovanni, receiving a lively production...
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