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By JOAN MELLEN and JOAN MELLEN,Special to the Sun | March 30, 2003
Cosmopolis, by Don DeLillo. Scribner. 224 pages. $25. In Cosmopolis, Don DeLillo's brilliant new novel, his 13th, Eric Packer, a 28-year-old ruthlessly amoral billionaire, spends a single day in his heavily loaded limousine, lurching through New York City. Computer screens project the currency market as he trades dangerously in yen, while his chief of security, Torval, watches for the assassin who has already announced Eric as his prey. The tone is futuristic, the time is the year 2000.
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FEATURES
April 9, 2013
The Library of Congress released today the list of speakers for the fall National Book Festival, and, as usual, the event is studded with prominent writers and poets. Among the headliners: Margaret Atwood, Baltimore's own Taylor Branch, Don DeLillo, Khaled Hosseini, Barbara Kingsolver, Joyce Carol Oates, and U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey. All together, there will be more than 100 speakers and there isn't much drop-off through the lineup. Take a quick glance at the list, and you'll see names including T.C. Boyle, Geraldine Brooks, Patricia Cornwell, Junot Díaz, Charlaine Harris, Jeff Kinney (Go Terps!
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FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | May 18, 1992
Washington -- Literature poked its high-brow head into the middle-brow milieu of the nation's capital Saturday evening for the 12th annual presentation of the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, which this year went to Don DeLillo for his novel "Mao II," a less than lighthearted tale that deals with mass Moonie weddings and terrorist kidnappings.National Public Radio's Susan Stamberg, mistress of ceremonies for the event, tried to set a politically correct feminist tone for the proceedings, describing herself as "Person of Ceremonies," adding after a pause, "P.C."
NEWS
By Sven Birkerts and Sven Birkerts,Special to the Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2007
Falling Man By Don DeLillo Scribner / 256 pages / $26 Every great disaster, even at a distance, intensifies our sense of mortality, filling our nostrils with what W.H. Auden called "the unmentionable odor of death." Stunned as we were by the horrific events of Sept. 11, 2001, we were also returned to a primal awareness: Old bets were canceled, new bets placed. Small surprise that so many novelists took up the challenge of representing the reconfigured present. In the short time since the disaster, John Updike, Claire Messud, Ian Mc- Ewan and several others have mobilized fictional premises around it. Provocative and engaging as some of these narratives have been, most have used the calamity as a plot element - an unquestionably powerful way to affect the characters and their situations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 4, 2001
"The Body Artist" (Scribner, 124 pages, $22) is Don DeLillo's 12th novel. Now 64, he has been publishing fiction for 30 years; his work includes "White Noise," "Mao II" and most recently and celebratedly, "Underworld." He is a marvelously accomplished craftsman, exuberantly experimental, a novelist of unquestionable stature. My only difficulty with his past work has been in his weaving actual events and real people into the fabric of his fiction -- at best a distraction and at worst a distortion of truth.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren | April 1, 1992
"Mao II," the 10th novel by Don DeLillo, has been given the prestigious PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, the PEN/Faulkner Foundation announced in a statement released today. It won out over four other nominees, including "Frog," by Stephen Dixon, a professor of fiction in the Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University.The award, which carries a prize of $10,000, will be presented at a dinner in Washington May 16. The PEN/Faulkner is the third major fiction award of the current literary season: Previously, Norman Rush's "Mating" won the National Book Award ("Frog" was also a nominee for that prize)
NEWS
By Diane Winston and Diane Winston,Diane Winston is a reporter for The Sun | August 5, 1991
MAO II. By Don Delillo. Viking. $19.95, 241 pages.MAO II" is less accessible than Don Delillo's last two novels, "White Noise" and "Libra," but it is as dark, provocative and lyrical as the earlier works. It is also as enjoyable -- if that word can describe the intellectual frisson sparked by Delillo's murky mutterings.In this new offering, Delillo dissects terrorism in the same way he examined ecological disaster and assassination in the earlier lTC books. (Actually terrorism is an old favorite of Delillo's -- it was the DianeWinstontheme of "Players" and "The Names.
FEATURES
April 9, 2013
The Library of Congress released today the list of speakers for the fall National Book Festival, and, as usual, the event is studded with prominent writers and poets. Among the headliners: Margaret Atwood, Baltimore's own Taylor Branch, Don DeLillo, Khaled Hosseini, Barbara Kingsolver, Joyce Carol Oates, and U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey. All together, there will be more than 100 speakers and there isn't much drop-off through the lineup. Take a quick glance at the list, and you'll see names including T.C. Boyle, Geraldine Brooks, Patricia Cornwell, Junot Díaz, Charlaine Harris, Jeff Kinney (Go Terps!
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,special the sun | September 28, 1997
"Underworld," by Don DeLillo. Scribner. 827 pages. $27.50.Don DeLillo's magnificent new "Underworld," at once among the finest works of American fiction of this century, opens at the Polo Grounds on Oct. 3, 1951. Behind Frank Sinatra, Jackie Gleason, who vomits on Sinatra's shoe, and Toots Shor sits the sinister J. Edgar Hoover. On the same day Bobby Thomson hits a home run that breaks the hearts of the Dodgers and the Soviets explode an atomic bomb.DeLillo has produced in one rich volume a work which surpasses even John Dos Passos' three-volume "USA."
NEWS
By Dan Vitale and Dan Vitale,Mr. Vitale is a writer living in Iowa City | June 9, 1991
MAO II.Don DeLillo.Viking.241 pages. $19.95. "Mao II" is spiritual kin to two other Don DeLillo productions, the introspective suspense thriller "Players" (1977) and the claustrophobic "Great Jones Street" (1972). Like the former, "Mao II" has something to do with terrorists, and like the latter it takes a reclusive pop-culture icon as its protagonist. In "Great Jones Street" it was a Dylanesque rock star; in "Mao II" it's a Salingersque novelist named Bill Gray.Blocked on his latest opus, restless after too many years spent in rustic seclusion, Gray is hungry to renew some kind of useful connection with the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOAN MELLEN and JOAN MELLEN,Special to the Sun | March 30, 2003
Cosmopolis, by Don DeLillo. Scribner. 224 pages. $25. In Cosmopolis, Don DeLillo's brilliant new novel, his 13th, Eric Packer, a 28-year-old ruthlessly amoral billionaire, spends a single day in his heavily loaded limousine, lurching through New York City. Computer screens project the currency market as he trades dangerously in yen, while his chief of security, Torval, watches for the assassin who has already announced Eric as his prey. The tone is futuristic, the time is the year 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 4, 2001
"The Body Artist" (Scribner, 124 pages, $22) is Don DeLillo's 12th novel. Now 64, he has been publishing fiction for 30 years; his work includes "White Noise," "Mao II" and most recently and celebratedly, "Underworld." He is a marvelously accomplished craftsman, exuberantly experimental, a novelist of unquestionable stature. My only difficulty with his past work has been in his weaving actual events and real people into the fabric of his fiction -- at best a distraction and at worst a distortion of truth.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 28, 1997
Books render life worth living. But with upwards of 60,000 published each year, the first rule is rejection. In 1998 I will shun all and any books in the following categories:Bimbology: JFK slept with Marilyn. Name your favorite politician and corresponding bimbo. I'm done with books like Seymour Hersh's "The Dark Side of Camelot," which wallow in the sexy sleaze, then, insisting that what they're writing is better than high-toned gossip, grasp for a theme, usually that bad character leads directly to bad foreign policy.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,special the sun | September 28, 1997
"Underworld," by Don DeLillo. Scribner. 827 pages. $27.50.Don DeLillo's magnificent new "Underworld," at once among the finest works of American fiction of this century, opens at the Polo Grounds on Oct. 3, 1951. Behind Frank Sinatra, Jackie Gleason, who vomits on Sinatra's shoe, and Toots Shor sits the sinister J. Edgar Hoover. On the same day Bobby Thomson hits a home run that breaks the hearts of the Dodgers and the Soviets explode an atomic bomb.DeLillo has produced in one rich volume a work which surpasses even John Dos Passos' three-volume "USA."
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | May 18, 1992
Washington -- Literature poked its high-brow head into the middle-brow milieu of the nation's capital Saturday evening for the 12th annual presentation of the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, which this year went to Don DeLillo for his novel "Mao II," a less than lighthearted tale that deals with mass Moonie weddings and terrorist kidnappings.National Public Radio's Susan Stamberg, mistress of ceremonies for the event, tried to set a politically correct feminist tone for the proceedings, describing herself as "Person of Ceremonies," adding after a pause, "P.C."
FEATURES
By Tim Warren | April 1, 1992
"Mao II," the 10th novel by Don DeLillo, has been given the prestigious PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, the PEN/Faulkner Foundation announced in a statement released today. It won out over four other nominees, including "Frog," by Stephen Dixon, a professor of fiction in the Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University.The award, which carries a prize of $10,000, will be presented at a dinner in Washington May 16. The PEN/Faulkner is the third major fiction award of the current literary season: Previously, Norman Rush's "Mating" won the National Book Award ("Frog" was also a nominee for that prize)
NEWS
By Sven Birkerts and Sven Birkerts,Special to the Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2007
Falling Man By Don DeLillo Scribner / 256 pages / $26 Every great disaster, even at a distance, intensifies our sense of mortality, filling our nostrils with what W.H. Auden called "the unmentionable odor of death." Stunned as we were by the horrific events of Sept. 11, 2001, we were also returned to a primal awareness: Old bets were canceled, new bets placed. Small surprise that so many novelists took up the challenge of representing the reconfigured present. In the short time since the disaster, John Updike, Claire Messud, Ian Mc- Ewan and several others have mobilized fictional premises around it. Provocative and engaging as some of these narratives have been, most have used the calamity as a plot element - an unquestionably powerful way to affect the characters and their situations.
NEWS
By Diane Winston and Diane Winston,Diane Winston is a reporter for The Sun | August 5, 1991
MAO II. By Don Delillo. Viking. $19.95, 241 pages.MAO II" is less accessible than Don Delillo's last two novels, "White Noise" and "Libra," but it is as dark, provocative and lyrical as the earlier works. It is also as enjoyable -- if that word can describe the intellectual frisson sparked by Delillo's murky mutterings.In this new offering, Delillo dissects terrorism in the same way he examined ecological disaster and assassination in the earlier lTC books. (Actually terrorism is an old favorite of Delillo's -- it was the DianeWinstontheme of "Players" and "The Names.
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