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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 3, 1994
Verdi, "Don Carlo." Performed by Ferruccio Furlanetto (Filippo II), Michael Sylvester (Don Carlo), Vladimir Chernov (Rodrigo), Samuel Ramey (Il Grande Inquisitore), Aprile Millo (Elisabetta di Valois), Dolora Zajick (La Principessa Eboli), and the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra and Chorus, James Levine conducting (Sony Classical S3K 52 500). "Don Carlo." Performed by Samuel Ramey (Filippo II), Luciano Pavarotti (Don Carlo), Paolo Coni (Rodrigo), Alexander Anisimov (Il Grande Inquisitore), Daniela Dessi (Elisabetta di Valois)
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 24, 2001
Opera, like the movies, isn't the most reliable source of history. If Verdi's "Don Carlo" were an accurate portrait of late 16th-century Spain, the title character would be an epileptic teen-ager with a humpback, a limp and a nasty disposition, not a romantic leading tenor. But for all its liberties with the facts, "Don Carlo" delivers compelling lessons on patriotism vs. rebellion, church vs. state, love vs. lust. Those lessons hit home vividly in the Washington Opera's current production.
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By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | October 21, 1991
SOMETIME after midnight, when the almost four-hour opera "Don Carlo" had ended, one musician leaving the Lyric Opera House yelled a good-natured goodbye to another: "They ought to call this 'Verdi's Ring Cycle.'"The Baltimore Opera Company chose Verdi's longest opera, dramatic and melody-rich, to open its 41st season Saturday. Even without its original Act I, "Don Carlo" (1867) is a marathon epic using more than 100 for its plot, set in 16th century Spain. Composer Giuseppe Verdi was worried more about the entire lasting impression than he was happy about "short-lived" applause for arias.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2001
Friedrich Schiller never had a father's love and approval, and he was destined to write about that lack for his entire life. The son's yearning for a close relationship with his father permeates Schiller's "Don Carlos." And it provides a steady pulse of feeling that transforms a play written in German in the 18th century, and set amid the politics and intrigue of the Spanish Inquisition, into something both intimate and universal. Schiller was such a master of plot and pacing, the Shakespeare Theatre's production is so intelligent and the actors are so sensitive to psychological nuance that the show almost flies by. At a running time of 3 hours, 10 minutes, that's no minor accomplishment.
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By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | February 13, 1991
THE BALTIMORE Opera Company will perform Verdi's "Don Carlo," Donizetti's "The Daughter of the Regiment" and Mozart's "The Magic Flute" next season, it told its subscribers in mailings this week.''Don Carlo,'' with James Morris singing King Philip and Kristjan Johannsson as Don Carlo, is scheduled Oct. 19, 23, 25 and 27. The Daughter of the Regiment,'' in French with Nova Thomas, is March 21, 25, 27 and 29, 1992. ''The Magic Flute,'' with Carroll Freeman and Kay Paschal, is set for April 25,29, May 1 and May 3, 1992.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 24, 2001
Opera, like the movies, isn't the most reliable source of history. If Verdi's "Don Carlo" were an accurate portrait of late 16th-century Spain, the title character would be an epileptic teen-ager with a humpback, a limp and a nasty disposition, not a romantic leading tenor. But for all its liberties with the facts, "Don Carlo" delivers compelling lessons on patriotism vs. rebellion, church vs. state, love vs. lust. Those lessons hit home vividly in the Washington Opera's current production.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | October 15, 1991
The Washington Opera and the D.C. Federation of Musicians Local 161-710 representing the opera orchestra will resume contract talks Oct. 16, one day before the company makes a final decision on whether to cancel its first production. Verdi's "Don Carlo" is set to open Nov. 9 at the Kennedy Center.Martin Feinstein, general director, said the company would make a final decision about "Don Carlo" Oct. 17. The old contract expired Aug. 31. Talks started in June and were last held Sept. 30.The next day the company said the parties were at "an apparent impasse" and that the opera may have to cancel part or all of its 1991-92 season of 63 performances.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | August 2, 1991
Less than a year after he warned that the Baltimore Opera Company was facing bankruptcy, BOC chairman Lowell Bowen has announced that "the opera has risen from the dead."Bowen said yesterday that unaudited financial statements for the fiscal year that ended June 30 show an operating surplus of $41,000, compared to a loss of $476,000 at this time last year. "That we survived is amazing," Bowen said. "That we finished in the black is miraculous."The company survived for two reasons. Last December it initiated a successful $1 million "Save the Opera" campaign that erased the company's long-term debt and provided enough cash flow to meet costs.
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By From staff reports | October 18, 1991
On the airMayor Kurt Schmoke is the scheduled guest of talk show host Tyrone Parker in his Sunday radio magazine show on WCBM-AM 680. The show is scheduled for two hours beginning at 8 p.m., and will include questions from a panel of journalist guests as well as inquiries from listeners.Crystal gazingA children's workshop on minerals and crystals will be featured in a ''Science and Rational Amusements Day,'' being held Sunday from 12:30 to 4 p.m. at the Peale Museum, 225 Holliday St. Displays by the Baltimore Astronomical Society and Baltimore Gem Cutters Guild, puppet shows, phrenology demonstrations and tours of the ''Mermaids, Mummies and Mastodons,'' exhibit will also be available.
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By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | August 1, 1991
The Baltimore Opera Company, faced with an operating loss of $476,000 and teetering on bankruptcy after the 1989-90 season, has ended its 1990-91 season in the black, with an operating surplus of $41,000, the opera said.The surplus in the yet-to-be audited statement is beyond the company's $1 million raised in pledges and cash in the 18-month "Save the Opera" campaign. Half of those funds have already come in with the other half expected by December, the general director, Michael Harrison, said yesterday.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | January 21, 2001
Ten minutes before 3 a.m. on Jan. 27, 1901, Giuseppe Verdi died in the Milan hotel suite where he had long spent his winters. He was 87. Verdi had suffered a stroke a few days earlier and gone into a coma; during that time, crowds milled outside waiting for bulletins, and straw was put down on the streets to soften the traffic noise. When his body was transported to the municipal cemetery, to lie beside that of his wife, his own funeral wishes were followed -- no music, no singing. There is a wonderful but apparently apocryphal story about those wishes suddenly being ignored as the coffin was lowered into the crypt.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 3, 1994
Verdi, "Don Carlo." Performed by Ferruccio Furlanetto (Filippo II), Michael Sylvester (Don Carlo), Vladimir Chernov (Rodrigo), Samuel Ramey (Il Grande Inquisitore), Aprile Millo (Elisabetta di Valois), Dolora Zajick (La Principessa Eboli), and the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra and Chorus, James Levine conducting (Sony Classical S3K 52 500). "Don Carlo." Performed by Samuel Ramey (Filippo II), Luciano Pavarotti (Don Carlo), Paolo Coni (Rodrigo), Alexander Anisimov (Il Grande Inquisitore), Daniela Dessi (Elisabetta di Valois)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | December 29, 1991
This was the year in which economic news was the grimmest in more than 50 years and the scarcity of funds has been scaring arts institutions.Saving money is the reason the Peabody Opera Theater decided to stage its fine "Marriage of Figaro" without props; and getting money is why the Baltimore Symphony asked its visionary former board president Buddy Zamoiski to resume his presidency after a two-year absence.But do you want the good news or the bad news first? The good news, of course! So here it is. (Apres ca, le deluge!
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff | October 25, 1991
FORTY years ago my opera-crazy father took our family to the old Met on 39th Street in New York to see Verdi's "Don Carlo." It began a 40-year circle that closed for me this week.The old man said there was this big young American in it, Jerome Hines. "They say he's pretty good."I was 14 and already an opera fan. My first was either Flotow's "Martha" (Dad took us because it was my mother's name) or Wagner's "Parsifal" (an Easter tradition). I forget which.There's very little I remember about that 1951 "Don Carlo" except Hines.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | October 21, 1991
The Monets now on exhibit at the Baltimore Museum of Art can be seen almost any time you visit Boston's Museum of Fine Arts. The sets and costumes of the current Baltimore Opera Company's stunning production of Verdi's "Don Carlos" can be seen this week only. Tickets for the Opera are easier to get and there's no standing on line.This production of Verdi's great score, which opened Saturday, is beautiful to look at -- as beautiful, in fact, as anything one might find in a museum. It was designed by the same team of Argentines -- Roberto Oswald, who directed, designed and lit it, and Anibal Lapiz, who did the costumes -- who were responsible for the wonderful production of "Salome" a few years back.
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By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | October 21, 1991
SOMETIME after midnight, when the almost four-hour opera "Don Carlo" had ended, one musician leaving the Lyric Opera House yelled a good-natured goodbye to another: "They ought to call this 'Verdi's Ring Cycle.'"The Baltimore Opera Company chose Verdi's longest opera, dramatic and melody-rich, to open its 41st season Saturday. Even without its original Act I, "Don Carlo" (1867) is a marathon epic using more than 100 for its plot, set in 16th century Spain. Composer Giuseppe Verdi was worried more about the entire lasting impression than he was happy about "short-lived" applause for arias.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff | October 25, 1991
FORTY years ago my opera-crazy father took our family to the old Met on 39th Street in New York to see Verdi's "Don Carlo." It began a 40-year circle that closed for me this week.The old man said there was this big young American in it, Jerome Hines. "They say he's pretty good."I was 14 and already an opera fan. My first was either Flotow's "Martha" (Dad took us because it was my mother's name) or Wagner's "Parsifal" (an Easter tradition). I forget which.There's very little I remember about that 1951 "Don Carlo" except Hines.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | January 21, 2001
Ten minutes before 3 a.m. on Jan. 27, 1901, Giuseppe Verdi died in the Milan hotel suite where he had long spent his winters. He was 87. Verdi had suffered a stroke a few days earlier and gone into a coma; during that time, crowds milled outside waiting for bulletins, and straw was put down on the streets to soften the traffic noise. When his body was transported to the municipal cemetery, to lie beside that of his wife, his own funeral wishes were followed -- no music, no singing. There is a wonderful but apparently apocryphal story about those wishes suddenly being ignored as the coffin was lowered into the crypt.
FEATURES
By From staff reports | October 18, 1991
On the airMayor Kurt Schmoke is the scheduled guest of talk show host Tyrone Parker in his Sunday radio magazine show on WCBM-AM 680. The show is scheduled for two hours beginning at 8 p.m., and will include questions from a panel of journalist guests as well as inquiries from listeners.Crystal gazingA children's workshop on minerals and crystals will be featured in a ''Science and Rational Amusements Day,'' being held Sunday from 12:30 to 4 p.m. at the Peale Museum, 225 Holliday St. Displays by the Baltimore Astronomical Society and Baltimore Gem Cutters Guild, puppet shows, phrenology demonstrations and tours of the ''Mermaids, Mummies and Mastodons,'' exhibit will also be available.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | October 15, 1991
The Washington Opera and the D.C. Federation of Musicians Local 161-710 representing the opera orchestra will resume contract talks Oct. 16, one day before the company makes a final decision on whether to cancel its first production. Verdi's "Don Carlo" is set to open Nov. 9 at the Kennedy Center.Martin Feinstein, general director, said the company would make a final decision about "Don Carlo" Oct. 17. The old contract expired Aug. 31. Talks started in June and were last held Sept. 30.The next day the company said the parties were at "an apparent impasse" and that the opera may have to cancel part or all of its 1991-92 season of 63 performances.
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