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Don Baylor

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SPORTS
September 1, 2011
September 18, 1970: Don Baylor had two hits and drove in three runs in his major-league debut.
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SPORTS
September 1, 2011
September 18, 1970: Don Baylor had two hits and drove in three runs in his major-league debut.
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SPORTS
By Phil Rogers | July 25, 2010
Teams can get burned hanging onto expendable veterans too long. The Royals likely lost David DeJesus (above) for the season with a torn ligament in his thumb when he crashed into the wall at Yankee Stadium on Thursday night, and saw Jose Guillen hurt his value when he cost the Royals a run by not hustling in the same game. The Giants were scouting Guillen when he failed to get across the plate from second before Wilson Betemit was thrown out trying to stretch a single into a double.
SPORTS
October 6, 2010
Baylor brings out best Phil Rogers Chicago Tribune For one shining season, Sammy Sosa was everything any manager would want a hitter to be. He had tremendous power but was willing to use the whole field, and he didn't force the action when teams tried to get him to chase pitches. He was also an interested right fielder and a genuine teammate in the clubhouse. This was 2001, and Don Baylor was the manager who got through to him. Sosa would revert to his selfish ways the following season, trying to hit more home runs than Barry Bonds after a spring-training war of words, but Baylor's impact shouldn't be forgotten.
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | May 4, 1993
I still remember the sincerity in the Oriole player's voice as he confessed a personal fear on a team bus in New York."Sometimes I'm out there on the field," he said timorously, "and I think about what can happen to you when you're exposed like that. All it takes is one nut in the stands. He can shoot you right there. There's nothing to stop him.""Aw, you're worried about nothing," I assured the rookie, who had grown up in Austin, Texas. "The fans love you guys."This was not one of the present Orioles speaking.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | October 28, 1992
Rejection. Frustration. Hurt. A reason to ponder and to wonder. Yet never a word of protest. Don Baylor carried the disappointment within. No crying, cheap alibis or denunciations. He had become conditioned to being interviewed for major-league managing vacancies, but the result always came back the same.Prospective employers would call to tell him they were impressed with his credentials, had enjoyed the opportunity to get to know him but, no, they had decided to go in a different direction.
SPORTS
July 2, 2006
A scout's take On Chris R. Young, a 27-year-old right-handed starter for the San Diego Padres with a 7-3 record and 2.97 ERA in 16 games Ability -- His stuff is just vanilla. His fastball is 90-91, and he has a little slider and a little changeup. Ask anyone to grade his stuff, and they'd say it's not better than average across the board. Mechanics -- He doesn't have a classic delivery. What comes into play and makes him successful is that 6-foot-10 height. He comes down from that plane and he does a good job hiding the ball.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | October 28, 1992
Don Baylor, who had been seeking a managerial breakthrough the past four years, found the opening he was looking for yesterday in the heart of the Rocky Mountains.The ex-Oriole, whose hard-nosed reputation preceded him at seven major-league stops, was introduced as the first manager of the expansion Colorado Rockies at a late afternoon news conference in Denver."To me this is a thrill, a chance to build something from scratch," said Baylor. "There will be a lot of young players, and I want to teach them how to win."
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | April 15, 1993
The intrusive camera scanned the dugout and despite a 4-2 lead with two outs and the bases empty in the New York eighth, Don Baylor, manager of the Colorado Rockies, looked ill at ease. A hit (?) dribbled under the first baseman's glove, followed by another sturdier brand. Baylor went to his bullpen. Eight of the next 10 pitches were balls. A third straight base on balls tied the score. Remember, this was all after two outs.A wild pitch put the Mets ahead and another pass (for a dozen) was followed by a high fly to right field, which Dante Bichette jogged back on and turned into three more runs, a gift triple.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1999
ATLANTA -- His pupils are busy teaching the New York Mets a lesson, generating enough timely hits to build a 2-0 lead in the National League Championship Series. Two more wins and the Atlanta Braves are headed to another World Series, poised to stake their claim as the team of the decade.This is a good time to be Don Baylor, the Braves' hitting coach who awaits tonight's Game 3 in New York. And it should get even better.Baylor has interviewed with three clubs for their vacant managerial positions and is considered the leading candidate in Anaheim.
SPORTS
By Phil Rogers | July 25, 2010
Teams can get burned hanging onto expendable veterans too long. The Royals likely lost David DeJesus (above) for the season with a torn ligament in his thumb when he crashed into the wall at Yankee Stadium on Thursday night, and saw Jose Guillen hurt his value when he cost the Royals a run by not hustling in the same game. The Giants were scouting Guillen when he failed to get across the plate from second before Wilson Betemit was thrown out trying to stretch a single into a double.
SPORTS
July 2, 2006
A scout's take On Chris R. Young, a 27-year-old right-handed starter for the San Diego Padres with a 7-3 record and 2.97 ERA in 16 games Ability -- His stuff is just vanilla. His fastball is 90-91, and he has a little slider and a little changeup. Ask anyone to grade his stuff, and they'd say it's not better than average across the board. Mechanics -- He doesn't have a classic delivery. What comes into play and makes him successful is that 6-foot-10 height. He comes down from that plane and he does a good job hiding the ball.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1999
ATLANTA -- His pupils are busy teaching the New York Mets a lesson, generating enough timely hits to build a 2-0 lead in the National League Championship Series. Two more wins and the Atlanta Braves are headed to another World Series, poised to stake their claim as the team of the decade.This is a good time to be Don Baylor, the Braves' hitting coach who awaits tonight's Game 3 in New York. And it should get even better.Baylor has interviewed with three clubs for their vacant managerial positions and is considered the leading candidate in Anaheim.
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | May 4, 1993
I still remember the sincerity in the Oriole player's voice as he confessed a personal fear on a team bus in New York."Sometimes I'm out there on the field," he said timorously, "and I think about what can happen to you when you're exposed like that. All it takes is one nut in the stands. He can shoot you right there. There's nothing to stop him.""Aw, you're worried about nothing," I assured the rookie, who had grown up in Austin, Texas. "The fans love you guys."This was not one of the present Orioles speaking.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | April 15, 1993
The intrusive camera scanned the dugout and despite a 4-2 lead with two outs and the bases empty in the New York eighth, Don Baylor, manager of the Colorado Rockies, looked ill at ease. A hit (?) dribbled under the first baseman's glove, followed by another sturdier brand. Baylor went to his bullpen. Eight of the next 10 pitches were balls. A third straight base on balls tied the score. Remember, this was all after two outs.A wild pitch put the Mets ahead and another pass (for a dozen) was followed by a high fly to right field, which Dante Bichette jogged back on and turned into three more runs, a gift triple.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | October 28, 1992
Don Baylor, who had been seeking a managerial breakthrough the past four years, found the opening he was looking for yesterday in the heart of the Rocky Mountains.The ex-Oriole, whose hard-nosed reputation preceded him at seven major-league stops, was introduced as the first manager of the expansion Colorado Rockies at a late afternoon news conference in Denver."To me this is a thrill, a chance to build something from scratch," said Baylor. "There will be a lot of young players, and I want to teach them how to win."
SPORTS
October 6, 2010
Baylor brings out best Phil Rogers Chicago Tribune For one shining season, Sammy Sosa was everything any manager would want a hitter to be. He had tremendous power but was willing to use the whole field, and he didn't force the action when teams tried to get him to chase pitches. He was also an interested right fielder and a genuine teammate in the clubhouse. This was 2001, and Don Baylor was the manager who got through to him. Sosa would revert to his selfish ways the following season, trying to hit more home runs than Barry Bonds after a spring-training war of words, but Baylor's impact shouldn't be forgotten.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | October 28, 1992
Rejection. Frustration. Hurt. A reason to ponder and to wonder. Yet never a word of protest. Don Baylor carried the disappointment within. No crying, cheap alibis or denunciations. He had become conditioned to being interviewed for major-league managing vacancies, but the result always came back the same.Prospective employers would call to tell him they were impressed with his credentials, had enjoyed the opportunity to get to know him but, no, they had decided to go in a different direction.
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