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By Susan Reimer | May 10, 2010
The lurid details in the beating death of Cockeysville's Yeardley Love — allegedly by George Huguely, a one-time boyfriend who also played lacrosse for the University of Virginia — have a haunting familiarity to them. Children of means and privilege. Spurned love. Drunken violence. And a beautiful, young woman's life ends in a pool of blood. The news stories put me in mind of Martha Moxley, another child of means and privilege, who was beaten to death with a golf club at the age of 15 after a night of partying with neighbors in her wealthy Greenwich, Conn.
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NEWS
By Susan Reimer | May 10, 2010
The lurid details in the beating death of Cockeysville's Yeardley Love — allegedly by George Huguely, a one-time boyfriend who also played lacrosse for the University of Virginia — have a haunting familiarity to them. Children of means and privilege. Spurned love. Drunken violence. And a beautiful, young woman's life ends in a pool of blood. The news stories put me in mind of Martha Moxley, another child of means and privilege, who was beaten to death with a golf club at the age of 15 after a night of partying with neighbors in her wealthy Greenwich, Conn.
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NEWS
By Elsbeth L. Bothe and Elsbeth L. Bothe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 1997
"Another City, Not My Own: A Novel in the Form of a Memoir," by Dominick Dunne.Crown, 360 pages, $25.This must be close to the hundredth book about the trials of Orenthal James Simpson, the subject continues to be as much a part of the literary landscape as the escapades of U.S. presidents. Few O.J. books are worth reading, and this one falls near the bottom of the pile.Dominick Dunne is no stranger either to murder or celebrity glitz. He is an insider in the heady circles where gossip is newsworthy.
NEWS
August 27, 2009
DOMINICK DUNNE, 83 Crime writer Author Dominick Dunne, who told stories of shocking crimes among the rich and famous through his magazine articles and best-selling novels such as "The Two Mrs. Grenvilles," died Wednesday in his Manhattan home. Mr. Dunne's son, actor-director Griffin Dunne, said in a statement released by Vanity Fair magazine that his father had been battling bladder cancer. In September 2008, against the orders of his doctor and the wishes of his family, Mr. Dunne flew to Las Vegas to attend the kidnap-robbery trial of O.J. Simpson, a postscript to his coverage of Simpson's 1995 murder trial, which spiked Mr. Dunne's considerable fame.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- It is dinner time in West Hollywood, and Dominick Dunne has just been seated at a table, the best table, naturally, in Mortons, a fashionable restaurant where the rich and famous gather to see and be seen.people, it seems, want to chat with Dominick Dunne, the ex-Hollywood producer turned novelist and magazine writer. Or to be more precise, they want to get their daily fix of the addiction that's got all of Los Angeles in its grip: the O. J. Simpson trial.To get a handle on just how deep this obsession with the O. J. trial runs, one could start right here, at Mortons, in the company of Dominick Dunne, one of a handful of writers with a permanent seat in the courtroomThroughout the evening, in a steady stream, deeply tanned men and glamorous women carrying $2,000 Hermes pocketbooks stop by his table to ask: What's happened to Marcia Clark?
NEWS
By Dominick Dunne | October 15, 1995
I use a computer mostly, some long-hand, but then I transfer it immediately and I carry a notebook with me at all times, even when shaving. I find that if I have a thought it won't be the same if I don't get it down right away.I have four computers. Two desktops, one in New York, one in my Connecticut house and 2 laps in California. Word Perfect version 5 is on all of them, then I just have to choose between a stiff and a floppy.And the modem ... I don't even know. I can't figure out how to use it. Vanity Fair, they know how dumb I am, they send someone over to do that stuff.
NEWS
August 27, 2009
DOMINICK DUNNE, 83 Crime writer Author Dominick Dunne, who told stories of shocking crimes among the rich and famous through his magazine articles and best-selling novels such as "The Two Mrs. Grenvilles," died Wednesday in his Manhattan home. Mr. Dunne's son, actor-director Griffin Dunne, said in a statement released by Vanity Fair magazine that his father had been battling bladder cancer. In September 2008, against the orders of his doctor and the wishes of his family, Mr. Dunne flew to Las Vegas to attend the kidnap-robbery trial of O.J. Simpson, a postscript to his coverage of Simpson's 1995 murder trial, which spiked Mr. Dunne's considerable fame.
NEWS
By Owen McNally and Owen McNally,Hartford Courant | September 8, 1991
THE MANSIONS OF LIMBO.Dominick Dunne.Crown.268 pages. $22.As Vanity Fair's chronicler of the rich, famous and infamous, Dominick Dunne is a first-rate journalist with a sharp eye for detail, an insatiable appetite for gossip and a priestlike empathy that makes his subjects open up to him."The Mansions of Limbo," a collection of Mr. Dunne's best profile pieces from Vanity Fair, provides entertaining glimpses into the world of glitz and glamour of the 1980s, our very own Gilded Age when wealth became the measure of all things.
FEATURES
By Mark Feeney and Mark Feeney,Boston Globe | February 20, 1994
What is it about the cover of Vanity Fair and odious people? Last month it was Roseanne Arnold, wearing a teddy and a look about as far from come hither (go yon?) as you can get and not end up in a fistfight.This month (March) it's the Trumps, looking like the strontium 90 of nuclear families: They give off an almost extraterrestrial glow. Ah, "the Trumps," a great American family name: like the Flintstones or Clampetts, only, somehow, loopier.Really now, aren't "Marla" (the missis) and "Tiffany" (the young 'un)
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | April 25, 1991
THE SWEEP MONTH of May means new episodes of series and a bunch of other highly promoted shows in addition to "Switched at Birth" and "Dinosaurs." Here are a few highlights:Sunday: "Shadow of a Doubt" (CBS) Hallmark Hall of Fame re-make of 1943 Hitchcock classic with Mark Harmon and Diane Ladd.May 3: "Dallas" (CBS) The venerable series that gave birth to the prime-time soap ends its run with a two-hour final episode.May 5: "Night of the Hunter" (ABC) Richard Chamberlain takes over the Robert Mitchum role from the 1955 movie in another re-make.
NEWS
By Elsbeth L. Bothe and Elsbeth L. Bothe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 1997
"Another City, Not My Own: A Novel in the Form of a Memoir," by Dominick Dunne.Crown, 360 pages, $25.This must be close to the hundredth book about the trials of Orenthal James Simpson, the subject continues to be as much a part of the literary landscape as the escapades of U.S. presidents. Few O.J. books are worth reading, and this one falls near the bottom of the pile.Dominick Dunne is no stranger either to murder or celebrity glitz. He is an insider in the heady circles where gossip is newsworthy.
NEWS
By Dominick Dunne | October 15, 1995
I use a computer mostly, some long-hand, but then I transfer it immediately and I carry a notebook with me at all times, even when shaving. I find that if I have a thought it won't be the same if I don't get it down right away.I have four computers. Two desktops, one in New York, one in my Connecticut house and 2 laps in California. Word Perfect version 5 is on all of them, then I just have to choose between a stiff and a floppy.And the modem ... I don't even know. I can't figure out how to use it. Vanity Fair, they know how dumb I am, they send someone over to do that stuff.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- It is dinner time in West Hollywood, and Dominick Dunne has just been seated at a table, the best table, naturally, in Mortons, a fashionable restaurant where the rich and famous gather to see and be seen.people, it seems, want to chat with Dominick Dunne, the ex-Hollywood producer turned novelist and magazine writer. Or to be more precise, they want to get their daily fix of the addiction that's got all of Los Angeles in its grip: the O. J. Simpson trial.To get a handle on just how deep this obsession with the O. J. trial runs, one could start right here, at Mortons, in the company of Dominick Dunne, one of a handful of writers with a permanent seat in the courtroomThroughout the evening, in a steady stream, deeply tanned men and glamorous women carrying $2,000 Hermes pocketbooks stop by his table to ask: What's happened to Marcia Clark?
FEATURES
By Mark Feeney and Mark Feeney,Boston Globe | February 20, 1994
What is it about the cover of Vanity Fair and odious people? Last month it was Roseanne Arnold, wearing a teddy and a look about as far from come hither (go yon?) as you can get and not end up in a fistfight.This month (March) it's the Trumps, looking like the strontium 90 of nuclear families: They give off an almost extraterrestrial glow. Ah, "the Trumps," a great American family name: like the Flintstones or Clampetts, only, somehow, loopier.Really now, aren't "Marla" (the missis) and "Tiffany" (the young 'un)
NEWS
By Owen McNally and Owen McNally,Hartford Courant | September 8, 1991
THE MANSIONS OF LIMBO.Dominick Dunne.Crown.268 pages. $22.As Vanity Fair's chronicler of the rich, famous and infamous, Dominick Dunne is a first-rate journalist with a sharp eye for detail, an insatiable appetite for gossip and a priestlike empathy that makes his subjects open up to him."The Mansions of Limbo," a collection of Mr. Dunne's best profile pieces from Vanity Fair, provides entertaining glimpses into the world of glitz and glamour of the 1980s, our very own Gilded Age when wealth became the measure of all things.
FEATURES
July 15, 1995
Man, is it hot! No, not the TV lineup; the temperature. Well actually, the viewing lineup for tonight doesn't look half bad. So, kick back with a tall cool, um, iced tea and enjoy! There are a couple of interesting specials and several decent movies.* "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman." (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Newly appointed by the government to ensure the rights of Native Americans, Sully (Joe Lando) seems destined to have to prove that his new boss is a thief in this repeat. He learns that the man has been pilfering badly needed supplies that were intended for the Cheyenne, but are being sold to merchants instead.
NEWS
May 6, 1999
Edward Davis, 88, a one-time mechanic who became the first black American to own a new car dealership, selling Studebakers and later Chrysler-Plymouth vehicles, died of congestive heart failure Monday in Detroit. In 1993, the National Association of Minority Automobile Dealers created the annual Edward Davis Pioneer Award. In January, Mr. Davis became the first black man to be inducted into the Automotive Hall of Fame Museum in Dearborn. George Butler, 94, an artist and the oldest living member of Britain's prestigious Royal Watercolor Society, died April 19 in Bakewell, England.
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