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Domestic Violence

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By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1998
Police officers and prosecutors in 32 jurisdictions across the state will have another weapon in the battle against domestic violence, courtesy of federal funding: instant photographs to document the damage done by an abuser.Police, prosecutors and Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend gathered yesterday at Maryland State Police headquarters in Pikesville to announce the distribution of 400 Polaroid Spectra cameras and film to law enforcement. The announcement was followed by a training session for about two dozen officers who will use the $250 cameras when they respond to domestic-violence calls.
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NEWS
October 12, 2014
The op-ed "Joint custody should be the rule, not the exception" (Oct. 8) trots out the tried and true myths about joint custody and about court adjudications. The statistics on families with joint custody include the 95 percent of all divorcing parents who settle out of court. Unless author Ned Holstein is proposing to mandate joint custody against the will of both parents, that statistic will remain. Of the remaining 5-10 percent of cases that go to court, 75 percent have a history of domestic violence.
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NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1999
It might be only a few hundred dollars to the thief who broke into a Towson church, but to victims of domestic violence, the stolen money was meant to offer a fresh start.Officials of the Active Coalition for Transitional Services (ACTS) said someone broke into a space they use at the First Lutheran Church of Towson and stole a water cooler jug containing about $300 in change.The organization provides services for survivors of domestic violence and their children, and the money was part of a fund-raiser for the private, nonprofit group.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
The panels on the stand-up display feature the words of a dozen women who survived domestic violence, telling why they stayed and how they left. Growing out of a larger effort to tackle domestic abuse - or intimate partner violence - as an issue affecting health and safety in the workplace, Kaiser Permanente sends the display, featuring the stories of its employees, around to its medical centers. The project aims to "to open up a conversation, to let employees and members know they're not the only one who may be experiencing domestic violence," said Ann Jordan, program manager for women's health at Kaiser, which offers domestic violence prevention programs to employees, including on-site services, referrals to community services such as shelters and training to recognize signs of abuse.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | February 20, 2009
As they sort through nearly two dozen domestic-violence initiatives this year, Maryland lawmakers are focusing on improvements to protective orders that they hope would make abuse victims safer. Ideas include adding another year if the subject of a protective order commits a new offense soon after the expiration of the first order and adding the alleged victim's pets to the stay-away provision. Cynthia M. Lifson, legislative counsel for the Maryland Network Against Domestic Violence, said she believes many of the domestic-violence bills have the "votes and momentum" to make it out of a legislative committee that has batted down similar legislation in years past.
NEWS
By Michelle Malkin | July 11, 1994
Los Angels -- WHAT LOVE Canal did for toxic waste, what Anita Hill did for sexual harassment and what Magic Johnson did for AIDS, the O.J. Simpson saga is on the verge of doing for domestic violence. Contrary to conventional wisdom, this is not a good thing.Special-interest advocates argue that what each of those high-profile cases of victimization did was "raise awareness" about sensitive issues. True enough. But any real gains that came from heightened public attention to those problems have been erased by a destructive tornado of expansive government intervention, irresponsible public policy, profligate spending and widespread miseducation.
NEWS
November 11, 2013
The recent article, "Gansler, Brown clash over domestic violence proposals (Oct 29), pointed out to your readers where two candidates stand regarding domestic violence, so how about giving me an opportunity to express my thoughts on this issue? Unfortunately, I have been a victim of domestic violence. I know first hand what it is like when a spouse hits you, spits at you, attempts to scratch your eyes and uses verbal abuse as well. My experiences from this dreadful situation serve to validate the importance of getting out of those horrendous circumstances immediately.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
Two top Democrats vying to become governor on Friday pitched competing proposals to curb domestic violence, telling legislators current laws do not go far enough to protect children. Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, testifying before the House Judiciary Committee, pitched three bills backed by the O'Malley administration, including one that would make it a crime to commit an act of domestic violence in front of a child. Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler testified on a similar proposal that would make it a crime to commit any act of violence in front of children who are at least two-years-old.
NEWS
September 2, 2014
I found it very interesting that in an edition of your newspaper reporting the NFL's very strong domestic violence policy and the Baltimore Ravens' very generous contribution to the House of Ruth in support of victims of domestic violence, the comics reveal a different point of view. In the comic strip, "The Middletons," the husband makes a less than sensitive comment about his wife and her response is violence! It is not OK for a person (male or female) to hit another person over words or other non-life threatening events.
NEWS
August 18, 2011
Susan Reimer highlights several positive steps that insurance companies are taking (with a nudge from the federal government) to enhance the physical and emotional well-being of women in this country ("Big step forward for women's health," Aug. 15). Included among the preventative care measures is a mandate that counseling for domestic violence victims be provided without a co-pay or deductible. Yet while this provision is to be applauded, it does not ensure that similar services are available for male victims of domestic violence.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Dawn Root's life took a serendipitous turn two years ago, one that eventually brought her to talk about her mother's death as a way to fight domestic violence. The Glen Burnie resident spoke as an advocate and survivor Tuesday at the fifth annual candlelight vigil held by HopeWorks, a Howard County agency that serves victims of sexual, dating and domestic violence. The event, held in Columbia, marked October's designation as Domestic Violence Awareness Month across the country. Root told the gathering of 40 people wearing purple ribbons that she is on a mission to speak to audiences across the Baltimore area "since living in the darkness wasn't serving me, and I realized it was time to leave negativity behind.
NEWS
September 30, 2014
The answer to Dan Rodricks ' question as to whether the Ravens' "generous" donation to the House of Ruth will mute criticism of the Raven's and the NFL's ham-handed and cynical handling of the Ray Rice fiasco is, of course it will ("Looking for silver lining in the ugliness of the Rice case," Sept. 27). That's what it is intended for. Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and their respective coverup crews are so incredibly hypocritical. Throwing money at it has seldom been an effective solution to a societal problem, particularly one as serious and pervasive as intimate partner violence.
NEWS
September 29, 2014
What a breath of fresh air was the letter from Rachel McClellan ( "I'm keeping my Ray Rice jersey," Sept. 24). I don't own a Rice jersey. If I did, I would not only keep it, I would wear it in public. It is always amazing to me how the self-righteous among us can act as if they have the right to "cast the first stone. " To be sure, domestic violence is wrong. In my opinion, all violence is wrong. However, there are always two sides to every incident no matter how egregious it appears.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 27, 2014
Even as we continued to dissect the National Football League's mishandling of the Ray Rice case and millionaires associated with the matter apologized (again) for being obtuse to domestic violence, the conversation seemed to turn toward a silver lining. To wit: Maybe good will come of this ugliness. The NFL's inadequate reaction to Rice's assault unleashed strong public backlash, heightened awareness of the everyday reality of intimate-partner abuse and forced the league and the Baltimore Ravens to make big-time amends, including a six-figure donation to the House of Ruth Maryland.
NEWS
September 26, 2014
Thank you, thank you, thank you for finally putting out a worthy and truthful account of the Ray Rice issue and its handling by the Ravens ( "The Ravens' story shifts," Sept. 23)! I am a domestic abuse survivor and I would really like to see that this situation could educate and really help victims, survivors and abusers. I was extremely hopeful when Ray Rice was handed a two-game suspension and when it was criticized by the public, many of whom do not even really know the whole story, know Ray Rice as the man and humanitarian he is or know anything about domestic violence.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The NFL is devoting commercial time to public service announcements from the No More anti-domestic violence campaign during all of its game broadcasts this weekend, including broadcasts on CBS, FOX, NBC and ESPN, according to NFL spokeswoman Joanna Hunter. The 30-second PSA video  also ran during the New York Giants-Washington Redskins game on Thursday night. The PSA delivers a strong message speaking out against domestic violence and sexual assault. It includes appearances by actors Courtney Cox, Amy Poehler, Ice-T, Mariska Hargitay, Andre Braugher and Debra Messing.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn | January 23, 2012
The state plans to open its sixth hospital-based domestic violence program in Hagerstown, officials said today. Other programs have been opened in Baltimore-area hospitals and this will be the first in Western Maryland, according to Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, who has worked to expand programs since 2008 when his cousin was killed in 2008 by an estranged boyfriend. He joined advocates and officials in announcing the program at Meritus Medical Center., which will be funded with $50,000 in state grant money and $16,000 from CareFirst Blue Cross Blue Shield for the first year.
NEWS
November 4, 2013
SARC, a non-profit in Harford County providing hope and resources to victims of domestic violence, sexual violence, child abuse and stalking, received a proclamation from the Harford County Council recognizing October as Domestic Violence Awareness Month. The proclamation was issued by Billy Boniface and the Harford County Council in hopes to increase public awareness about domestic violence. The proclamation states the long-term personal and societal effects of domestic violence, which is a largely under-reported crime.
NEWS
September 19, 2014
Recent events in the news have called attention to domestic violence, particularly in association with the NFL. Ray Rice is at the forefront, but Adrian Peterson has also been charged with child abuse. In the past other star athletes have been charged with sexual abuse or even murder. As a nation we are outraged by the NFL's handling of all these events past and present. Sitting in front of our TVs waiting to see how the NFL and its executives will be punished enthralls us. But how many of us have watched what is unfolding on TV and gotten up to do something to help others who are experiencing violence in their lives, domestic or otherwise?
NEWS
September 18, 2014
Finally, someone can see through the phony NFL, the Ravens and their hypocritical "Shield of Honor. " Scott Green from Chicago in his letter in Saturday's Baltimore Sun ( "What the Ravens should have done," Sept. 13) had a contrarian view on the Ray Rice episode, but I believe he was dead on correct. The Ravens turned their backs on a "family" member and their "brother. " Not much in the way of condemnation came from any of Mr. Rice's teammates, for "people who live in glass houses," and you know the rest.
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