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By BEN WATTENBERG | August 7, 1991
It's said, by Democrats, that ''George Bush has no domestic policy,'' and that ''America is gridlocked.'' They demand of the globe-trotting president: ''George Bush, come home!''Foreign policy experts who have been spectacularly wrong about foreign policy now say the best foreign policy is domestic policy. (My, doesn't a liberal arts education yield cosmic insights into all fields?)The implication is that ''lack of a domestic policy'' will be a Republican burden in the election. We shall see.There would seem to be two contested ideas in all democratic governments.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | November 19, 2012
I think I owe an apology to George W. Bush. William F. Buckley once noted that he was 19 when the Cold War began at the Yalta conference. The year the Berlin Wall came down, he became a senior citizen. In other words, he explained, anti-Communism was a defining feature of conservatism his entire adult life. Domestically, meanwhile, the right was largely a "leave me alone coalition": Religious and traditional conservatives, overtaxed businessmen, Western libertarians, and others fed up with government social engineering and economic folly.
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NEWS
By Maura Reynolds and Maura Reynolds,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 23, 2007
WASHINGTON -- As President Bush prepares to deliver his first State of the Union address to a Democratic-controlled Congress, he might be at the lowest point in his six-year presidency, analysts say. Yet on domestic policy, the president might have an opportunity to revive his fortunes on several fronts, including health care, immigration and energy policy. What that would take is a willingness by the president to work to achieve compromises on Capitol Hill even at the risk of displeasing the Republican Party's conservative base.
NEWS
September 14, 2012
If I were President Obama, I would not try to defend my record of the last almost four years and instead ignore it completely, depending on charm rhetoric and likability for reelection ("Obama's downsized ambitions," Sept. 9). Certainly there has been little either in domestic or foreign policy to point at with pride, now culminating in the sacking of our embassies overseas and the murder of an ambassador in purportedly friendly countries. Our attempts at making allies in the Muslim world has been an abject failure.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 13, 1993
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -- President Clinton yesterday delivered a much-heralded speech intended to lay out the overarching principles that he believe unify his domestic policy initiatives, declaring that "the challenge of our time" is to provide Americans the security to change in a changing world.The attempt nine months after his election to describe what former President Bush disparagingly used to call the "vision thing" centered on the theme of "security."In Mr. Clinton's eyes, America is in the midst of a period of rapid and unsettling change.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 7, 2000
WASHINGTON -- For months now, Campaign 2000 has revolved around questions of integrity and character, but burbling beneath the surface are domestic policy issues that sharply divide Democrats and Republicans, while adding nuances to the nomination races. Last week, an ABC News/Washington Post poll found that 59 percent of voters believe a candidate's position on issues eclipses his personal character in determining their vote. Only 18 percent said they would vote primarily on their perception of a candidate's character.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 22, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Hillary Rodham Clinton will set up shop in the West Wing of the White House, alongside the president's senior staff members, where she will help formulate policy on health care and other domestic issues, according to White House officials.First ladies have customarily operated from the East Wing of the White House, with their official contributions limited to social duties or charitable causes.Presidents' wives have always exercised influence and power, but they have often been reluctant, in their public comments, to acknowledge the full scope, for fear of offending voters.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 18, 2004
WASHINGTON - Twenty years after she toiled on an education reform agenda as a legislative staff member in the Texas Capitol, Margaret Spellings was nominated by President Bush yesterday to become the nation's top education official. A longtime Bush aide now serving as his domestic policy adviser, Spellings was overcome by emotion as she talked about the task at hand as the president's choice for education secretary. "I am a product of our public schools," she said, choking back tears.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1997
COLLEGE PARK -- Bill Galston has enough time for Ezra these days.And he's certain he made the right decision 22 months ago when, after serving more than two years as deputy domestic policy adviser in Bill Clinton's White House, he quit to spend more time with his young son.But he hasn't put politics behind him. Just the high energy, adrenalin pumping, every-waking-minute kind of politics.Which isn't to say he's not busy in his new life.William A. Galston is a professor at the University of Maryland's School of Public Affairs.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 1, 1991
Today Khafji, tomorrow the world.The longer this war keeps up, the longer George can get by without a domestic policy.Germany will pay for this war. But not as much as it costs.According to leading economic indicators, there is light beyond the darkness at the end of the tunnel.
NEWS
By Maura Reynolds and Maura Reynolds,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 23, 2007
WASHINGTON -- As President Bush prepares to deliver his first State of the Union address to a Democratic-controlled Congress, he might be at the lowest point in his six-year presidency, analysts say. Yet on domestic policy, the president might have an opportunity to revive his fortunes on several fronts, including health care, immigration and energy policy. What that would take is a willingness by the president to work to achieve compromises on Capitol Hill even at the risk of displeasing the Republican Party's conservative base.
NEWS
By STEVEN PHILIP KRAMER and STEVEN PHILIP KRAMER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2006
George W. Bush is not alone. Tony Blair, who basked in extraordinarily high public approval ratings when he became prime minister of Britain nine years ago, is now the most unpopular Labor Party prime minister in modern times, a Daily Telegraph survey showed last week. While Bush struggles with an approval rating in the low 30s, only 26 percent of British voters are satisfied with Blair's performance, lower than Prime Minister Harold Wilson's 27 percent rating in May 1968 after devaluation of the pound.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 19, 2005
WASHINGTON - As a group of conservative leaders huddled to plot strategy on stem-cell research this week, a White House aide made a quick but pointed detour off-topic to discuss the fate of President Bush's stalled judicial nominees. He told participants of a conference call that administration officials "are doing everything we can to be helpful" as Senate Republicans work to win votes on Bush's court picks. And he bluntly dismissed a bargain being considered by some senators that would allow action on only a few judges, calling it "no compromise, as far as this White House is concerned," according to the head of a conservative think tank.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 13, 2005
WASHINGTON - A restrained Howard Dean took over as Democratic national chairman yesterday with a pledge to change his party and make it competitive again on the national level. The one-time presidential contender focused his remarks to party leaders on economic issues, attacking the "fiscal recklessness" of President Bush's budget and barely mentioning foreign policy and the Iraq war. Later, Dean told reporters he expects to spend much of his time on the road in the so-called red states, especially the South and parts of the West, where the national Democratic Party is at its lowest ebb in more than 40 years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 18, 2004
WASHINGTON - Twenty years after she toiled on an education reform agenda as a legislative staff member in the Texas Capitol, Margaret Spellings was nominated by President Bush yesterday to become the nation's top education official. A longtime Bush aide now serving as his domestic policy adviser, Spellings was overcome by emotion as she talked about the task at hand as the president's choice for education secretary. "I am a product of our public schools," she said, choking back tears.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 17, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush is expected to name longtime aide and White House domestic policy adviser Margaret Spellings as his new secretary of education, a decision that could be announced as soon as today. The announcement would put Bush at three-for-three in dispatching White House insiders - who also are advisers who predate his Washington years - to head up key agencies as he reshapes his Cabinet. Bush named yesterday national security adviser Condoleezza Rice, who began counseling Bush as he geared up for the 2000 campaign, as secretary of state.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 11, 1991
If Lithuania can evict the Russians, the Philippines has the right to kick us out.George does too have a domestic policy. It is to get Clarence Thomas onto the Supreme Court.Now Ed Hale can merge Baltimore Bancorp with the Blast and move it to Dundalk.First, Tadzhikistan declared sovereign independence. Now, it needs an airline.Cheer up. Congress is back on the job.
NEWS
January 15, 1993
Mark Gearan: assistant to the president and deputy chief-of-staffDavid Watkins: assistant to the president for office of administration and managementChristine Varney: deputy assistant to the president and Cabinet secretaryBruce Lindsey: assistant to the president and senior adviser and director: Office of PersonnelL John Podesta: assistant to the president and staff secretaryNancy Hernreich: deputy assistant to the president for appointments and schedulingEli Segal:...
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 13, 2004
WASHINGTON - Education Secretary Rod Paige is planning to resign, ending a bumpy four years implementing President Bush's far-reaching and controversial public-school reforms, an administration official said last night. The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said Paige "has been looking at leaving" and has been "in discussion with the White House about the right time to do so." The official declined to say whether Paige has already submitted a letter of resignation to the president.
NEWS
By Mark Z. Barabak and Matea Gold and Mark Z. Barabak and Matea Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 19, 2003
MANCHESTER, N.H. - Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean stridently rejected his rivals' criticisms that he is unversed on foreign policy and accused them yesterday of obediently following President Bush's lead on the war with Iraq. Dean's remarks intensified the acrimony among the Democratic presidential candidates over their stances on the U.S. invasion of Iraq, a debate that was reignited with the capture of former dictator Saddam Hussein. Yesterday, the Democratic front-runner repeated his view that the capture has not made the United States safer.
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