Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDomestic Flights
IN THE NEWS

Domestic Flights

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By ASSOCIATION PRESS | May 15, 1991
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Citing a reduction in the threat of terrorism, Transportation Secretary Samuel K. Skinner said yesterday that the tight security measures at U.S. airports imposed during the Persian Gulf war will soon be relaxed.Mr. Skinner added, however, that domestic airport and airline security would still be at a higher level than before the war and would not be reduced at all on international flights.Hours after the war began Jan. 16, the Federal Aviation Administration raised airport and airline security to "level four," the highest level ever imposed.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | May 13, 2009
AirTran Airways will become the first major airline to add high-speed Internet service to all of its planes, in a move that could pressure other airlines to speed up plans to offer the service. The Florida-based airline said Tuesday that it will offer Wi-Fi service on its 136 jets by midsummer. It's the most aggressive move to date by a large airline to allow passengers to browse the Web using their laptops, smart phones or PDAs. AirTran will charge $9.95 for flights under three hours and $12.95 for longer flights.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
January 7, 1993
United Airlines to lay off 2,800United Airlines said yesterday that it would lay off 2,800 employees, cut executive salaries by 5 percent and seek union concessions in the latest round of cutbacks in the money-losing airline industry.United also announced a hiring freeze and said it would reduce its schedule of domestic flights and cancel plans for some new XTC international routes.@
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 10, 2007
WASHINGTON -- By early next year, passengers on flights bound for the United States will have their names checked against terrorist watch lists before departure, instead of after takeoff, Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff announced yesterday. The change is part of a slowly unfolding shift to put the Department of Homeland Security in charge of the watch-list screening for all commercial flights, foreign and domestic. Last year alone, 87 million passengers flew into the United States from abroad.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 26, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A White House commission established because of the crash of TWA Flight 800 will probably go out of existence without determining the feasibility of two significant security steps: matching passengers and bags on domestic flights, and determining which passengers are possible risks and warrant closer scrutiny.The panel, the Commission on Aviation Safety and Security, will meet tomorrow and Tuesday to try to establish a consensus on safety and security recommendations. The group made preliminary recommendations in September but is to make a final report to President Clinton on Feb. 12."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 10, 2007
WASHINGTON -- By early next year, passengers on flights bound for the United States will have their names checked against terrorist watch lists before departure, instead of after takeoff, Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff announced yesterday. The change is part of a slowly unfolding shift to put the Department of Homeland Security in charge of the watch-list screening for all commercial flights, foreign and domestic. Last year alone, 87 million passengers flew into the United States from abroad.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | January 9, 1992
American Airlines thinks there are a lot of people who fly between New York and Los Angeles who are willing to pay a premium price for a choice of movies, fine wine, goat cheese and a seat that turns into a bed.The airline announced yesterday that beginning Feb. 4 it will fly reconfigured airliners that offer passengers a level of service now largely limited to international flights.The McDonnell Douglas DC-10s will offer two classes of premium service -- business and first class -- in addition to coach seats.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | May 13, 2009
AirTran Airways will become the first major airline to add high-speed Internet service to all of its planes, in a move that could pressure other airlines to speed up plans to offer the service. The Florida-based airline said Tuesday that it will offer Wi-Fi service on its 136 jets by midsummer. It's the most aggressive move to date by a large airline to allow passengers to browse the Web using their laptops, smart phones or PDAs. AirTran will charge $9.95 for flights under three hours and $12.95 for longer flights.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | April 2, 1993
So you're a wreck as you fly from Baltimore to Boston, unable to take a single puff. Relax. Smokers Express Airlines may be coming this way.Dozens of small carriers start up each year, hoping to find a niche in the fiercely competitive airline industry. And the Florida-based Smokers Express has got a gimmick designed to lure disgruntled puffers who're forced by federal law to extinguish their smokes on nearly all domestic flights.By operating as a club, Smokers Express, just like charter flights, would be exempt from federal regulations that prohibit smoking on domestic flights six hours or less.
ENTERTAINMENT
By A Sun Staff Writer | June 22, 2003
"By the end of the year, United Airlines plans to be the first airline to offer two-way e-mail capability aboard all its domestic flights." - Associated Press, June 17. HUBBY545: Hey, I'm at the airport. Actually, I'm on the plane. They got e-mail. WIFEY544: Cool. We can talk the whole flight. HUBBY545: Yeah, it will be great. WIFEY544: So, who's sitting next to you? HUBBY545: Some guy trying to cram his golf clubs in the overhead bin. Now he's trying to stuff a crate of Florida oranges up there.
TRAVEL
By AMY GUNDERSON and AMY GUNDERSON,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 2006
Poached sea bass with sun-dried tomato vinaigrette, seared ahi tuna with ponzu sauce served over napa cabbage, filet mignon with chimichurri sauce: They sound like items on a menu at a four-star resort, not something to chow down on while wedged into seat 34B. But as airlines have pared their meal services down to a bag of pretzels or chips on domestic flights -- if even that -- more resorts have stepped in with the latest must-have amenity: the to-go...
BUSINESS
By MARK SKERTIC and MARK SKERTIC,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 9, 2005
Coffee? Soft drink? A pair of sunglasses or half-pound box of chocolates? Travelers aboard United Airlines' Ted flights have a new set of choices. And, just like in-flight meals, choosing one of these new items will require reaching for a wallet or purse. The airline has begun offering its self-described "boutique in the sky" on Ted, the offshoot of United that serves vacation destinations such as Orlando, Fla.; Las Vegas; and Phoenix. "It combines fun, in-flight entertainment and convenience - things that are all part of Ted," said United spokeswoman Robin Urbanski.
BUSINESS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | October 29, 2005
Delta Air Lines is discontinuing Song, the discount carrier it launched 2 1/2 years ago to do battle with other low-cost airlines in Florida and other East Coast markets. Song's operations will be absorbed into Delta's in May, Delta announced yesterday. The seat-back televisions, MP3 players and gourmet snack and meal options might disappear from some shorter routes, such as flights to Northeastern cities, Delta officials said. Delta, now in Chapter 11 bankruptcy, launched Song in 2003 in an effort to take on Southwest and JetBlue Airways on routes along the East Coast.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2004
In a move that could bring more international flights to Washington Dulles International Airport, United Airlines said yesterday that it will step up flights to cities overseas and reduce domestic service as a part of its larger plan to reduce costs, raise revenue and emerge from bankruptcy. United, the second-largest airline, has been in bankruptcy proceedings for almost two years. Observers had predicted it and other so-called legacy carriers with similar financial woes would begin cutting routes that increasingly are served by low-cost carriers such as Southwest Airlines and JetBlue Airways.
ENTERTAINMENT
By A Sun Staff Writer | June 22, 2003
"By the end of the year, United Airlines plans to be the first airline to offer two-way e-mail capability aboard all its domestic flights." - Associated Press, June 17. HUBBY545: Hey, I'm at the airport. Actually, I'm on the plane. They got e-mail. WIFEY544: Cool. We can talk the whole flight. HUBBY545: Yeah, it will be great. WIFEY544: So, who's sitting next to you? HUBBY545: Some guy trying to cram his golf clubs in the overhead bin. Now he's trying to stuff a crate of Florida oranges up there.
BUSINESS
By Richard J. Dalton Jr. and Richard J. Dalton Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 18, 2003
Though free airline meals might be vanishing, airplanes soon will have more and more servers - computer servers, that is. United Airlines plans to become the first domestic airline to offer e-mail on all its domestic flights by the end of the year, the company announced yesterday. For $15.98 a flight, passengers can send and receive e-mail, including attachments, by connecting their laptop computers to a jack on the Verizon Airfone handsets. E-mails of 2 kilobytes or less are included.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2004
In a move that could bring more international flights to Washington Dulles International Airport, United Airlines said yesterday that it will step up flights to cities overseas and reduce domestic service as a part of its larger plan to reduce costs, raise revenue and emerge from bankruptcy. United, the second-largest airline, has been in bankruptcy proceedings for almost two years. Observers had predicted it and other so-called legacy carriers with similar financial woes would begin cutting routes that increasingly are served by low-cost carriers such as Southwest Airlines and JetBlue Airways.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and Karen Hosler and David L. Greene and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 27, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush will unveil a package of measures today to try to improve safety and restore confidence in U.S. air travel, including strengthening cockpit doors and putting armed federal agents on most domestic flights, administration and congressional aides said. Bush will also propose that the federal government assume a greater role in overseeing airport security and screening passengers. The president is scheduled to visit Chicago's O'Hare International Airport, where he will outline his plans to airline workers.
TOPIC
By Peter J. Ognibene and Peter J. Ognibene,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 30, 2001
A FEW DAYS after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, U.S. Transportation Secretary Norman Y. Mineta announced the appointment of two "rapid response" teams to come up with security plans for airliners and airports. Their report is due tomorrow. On Thursday, President Bush provided a preview of what that report is likely to recommend: armed air marshals on domestic flights, stronger cockpit doors and some measure of federal supervision of airport security operations. The president also asked that governors deploy National Guard units until his recommendations can be put in place.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and Karen Hosler and David L. Greene and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 27, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush will unveil a package of measures today to try to improve safety and restore confidence in U.S. air travel, including strengthening cockpit doors and putting armed federal agents on most domestic flights, administration and congressional aides said. Bush will also propose that the federal government assume a greater role in overseeing airport security and screening passengers. The president is scheduled to visit Chicago's O'Hare International Airport, where he will outline his plans to airline workers.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.