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Domestic Agenda

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By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush suggested to 2,000 hand-picked supporters in his backyard last night that, together, they might work around the Congress to solve America's problems.Saying he was "disappointed but not surprised" at Congress' inaction on the domestic policy agenda he had set out in his State of the Union address, he added: "We cannot let Congress discourage or deter us from meeting our responsibilities."The president had assembled the supporters to blame lawmakers for the nation's failure to address serious domestic problems.
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NEWS
By James Oliphant, Janet Hook and Christi Parsons and Tribune Newspapers | April 10, 2010
Friday's announcement by Justice John Paul Stevens that he would leave the Supreme Court after a 35-year tenure in which he emerged as its leading liberal voice presents the White House with a heady political calculation. It could invest its efforts, energy and capital in a potentially draining fight this summer over a Supreme Court nominee like Diane Wood, a Chicago federal appeals judge with controversial rulings on abortion in her past who would almost guarantee a raging firefight over her confirmation.
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By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | August 21, 1991
IT DIDN'T TAKE LONG for President Bush to put his Democratic critics in their place.They've been complaining that he is indifferent to domestic problems and spends most of his time jetting to faraway places with strange-sounding names.But as soon as he returned from his latest jaunt, Bush struck back. And he did so with stunning political force.Before dashing to the golf course, he made a speech to a gathering of law enforcement officials; and made his position on a key domestic issue perfectly clear.
NEWS
By Don Lee and Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee and Jim Puzzanghera,Tribune Newspapers | January 25, 2010
WASHINGTON - - With congressional support eroding, his popularity falling and his renomination of Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke potentially in trouble, President Barack Obama faces an even more daunting task in saving his entire domestic agenda and convincing millions of angry Americans that his economic policies will bring them a brighter future. Even as the economy has begun clawing its way out of the Great Recession and job losses have slowed dramatically, critics on the left and the right - even party loyalists - say the president has failed to articulate a clear economic vision.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | March 19, 1991
Washington--THE SPECULATION about whether President Bush should use his extraordinary personal popularity to promote his domestic agenda is based on a totally mistaken premise -- that Bush really has a domestic agenda he wants to see enacted.It is not just a question of a president who, like so many of his predecessors, prefers international affairs to the grimy complexity of domestic problems. Instead, Bush's lack of a domestic agenda worthy of the designation is a reflection of his reading of the national attitude these days -- and particularly the suspicion that grandiose federal programs never seem to solve the problems at which they are directed.
NEWS
By Jeff Zeleny and Jeff Zeleny,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 17, 2003
ST. LOUIS - President Bush trumpeted the success of the military campaign in Iraq as he traveled here yesterday to begin tending to another campaign: promoting his domestic agenda in Congress and convincing Americans that he is focused on correcting the economy. Standing on a factory floor, against a backdrop of two newly made Super Hornet fighter jets, the president launched the first in a series of postwar appearances outside Washington where he assumes the arduous task of selling his tax cut, which faces an uncertain fate in the Republican-controlled Congress because of the wilting economy and the widening budget deficit.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 2, 1991
KENNEBUNKPORT, Maine -- Some Democrats may despair of getting the country to focus on George Bush's domestic record, but the Republican president says he is determined to do it himself.The revolution in the Soviet Union has prompted Americans to put a premium on their leader's foreign policy expertise, but Mr. Bush said he plans to spend much of the next two months rebutting the Democrats' claim that that's all there is.In what could be billed as the first campaign swing of his all-but-announced candidacy for re-election, the president will stump the country talking about his proposals on crime, energy, transportation, civil rights, the environment and education.
NEWS
By Don Lee and Jim Puzzanghera and Tribune Newspapers | January 25, 2010
With congressional support eroding, his popularity falling and his renomination of Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke potentially in trouble, President Barack Obama faces an even more daunting task in saving his entire domestic agenda and convincing millions of angry Americans that his economic policies will bring them a brighter future. Even as the economy has begun clawing its way out of the Great Recession and job losses have slowed dramatically, critics on the left and the right - even party loyalists - say the president has failed to articulate a clear economic vision.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 14, 2003
WASHINGTON -- With Saddam Hussein toppled, President Bush is soon likely to have a rare chance to capitalize on a postwar surge in popularity to advance his domestic agenda and achieve long-held goals at home. Though the war is not over, Bush's success in swiftly ousting the Iraqi president's regime could make him a force to be reckoned with in Washington in coming months. He will try to score victories on such issues as tax cuts, education and health-care initiatives, and the confirmation of conservative judicial nominees.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Bush is flush with opportunity. He's riding high in the polls, his party controls both chambers of Congress, and his Democratic critics are struggling to find a coherent message. Once Congress convenes next month, the president will throw his weight behind an ambitious agenda. His top priorities include reforming welfare, Medicare and Social Security, opening federal funding to religious groups, and carrying out new and deeper tax cuts. Today in Philadelphia, Bush will give his first speech in months dedicated solely to domestic policy - a sign that he learned from the mistake of his father, who ignored issues at home as he waged a war abroad.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 23, 2007
FRANKLINTON, N.C. -- President Bush, an admittedly undistinguished history student in college, is devoting considerable time these days to scientific matters. Four weeks ago, he toured a chemical plant in Delaware. Earlier this month he visited a Virginia computer-chip manufacturer. On Wednesday, at a hospital in Tennessee, he watched a video of a surgical robot excising cancerous tissue, prompting his host to ask, "You OK with the blood?" And yesterday, he studied what it will take to put cellulosic ethanol in your tank.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 4, 2005
WASHINGTON - The frenzied din of liberal and conservative groups clashing and senators chattering into microphones was audible over the airwaves this weekend, as both sides in the fight over the Supreme Court took their battle stations. But if you listened closely, you might also have heard President Bush and Republican leaders breathe a sigh of relief. For Bush, the prospect of spending the next couple of months advancing a replacement for retiring Justice Sandra Day O'Connor is like an icy drink on an oppressively hot day. In the instant that Bush received word that there would be a court vacancy, he went from a president facing sagging poll numbers and a languid and unpredictable summer to one about to make one of the most important decisions of his presidency, highlighting issues that animate his base and absorb the attention of the nation.
BUSINESS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 15, 2005
WASHINGTON - President Bush, working to gain support for his ambitious domestic agenda, is encountering increasing resistance from an unlikely place: American business, a usually reliable ally. Many of these pro-Republican interests see little potential benefit for them in helping Bush win his two highest-stakes fights: shoring up Social Security and reshaping the tax code. Business interests still enthusiastically support a number of items on Bush's wish list, including a new energy policy, expanded trade and legal reforms aimed at curbing costly lawsuits and court settlements.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 29, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Opening a new phase in his so-far fruitless effort to revamp Social Security, President Bush outlined last night a plan that would scale back future benefits for middle- and high-income retirees, as he challenged a reluctant Congress to start work on shoring up the program. Bush, facing sagging approval ratings and gridlock in Congress on much of his ambitious domestic agenda, used the first prime-time televised news conference of his second term to declare that he would not back down in the face of opposition to his Social Security plan, a broad energy measure or his stalled judicial nominations.
NEWS
February 9, 2005
WORLD Palestinians, Israelis in accord Palestinian and Israeli leaders declared an end to "acts of violence" yesterday in a landmark meeting in Egypt, in hopes that the action will lead to a permanent peace. [Page 1a] Rice asks Europe's help in Iraq Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice urged America's allies in Europe to put aside differences with the United States over Iraq and help the Bush administration press for democracy in the Muslim world. [Page 1a] NATIONAL GOP looks hard at Bush plan Congressional Republicans expressed concern as they began searching for ways to achieve President Bush's overall deficit-reduction targets without harming such popular programs as farm subsidies, Amtrak and aid to states.
NEWS
February 3, 2005
Excerpts of a response to the State of the Union address from House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi of California and Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid of Nevada Senator Reid: I believe we can make sure America lives up to its legacy as a land of opportunity if the president is willing to join hands and build from the center. It's important that we succeed. It's time that America's government lived by the same values as America's families. It's time we invested in America's future and made sure our people have the skills to compete and thrive in a 21st-century economy.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 25, 2005
WASHINGTON - As President Bush prepares to enlist Congress in enacting an ambitious domestic agenda littered with hot-button proposals, he is signaling subtle changes in the way he will approach Capitol Hill during his second term. Bush, who just finished a blisteringly partisan campaign, is telling Democrats he wants to work together to achieve results. He is quietly placating Republicans who worry that his lofty plans could spell political trouble for them down the road. And he is hitting public events throughout the country in a remarkably personal effort to sell his ideas to Americans, betting that their support will bring precious votes from their representatives in the House and Senate.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 8, 2002
WASHINGTON - In the clearest sign that he is ready to delve back into election politics and aggressively push his domestic agenda, President Bush is leaving today on a three-state tour where he will appear more as a campaigner than as a wartime leader. The trip comes on the heels of stops during the weekend in California and Oregon, where Bush sternly warned Democrats against trying to roll back his tax cut from last year and accused them of spoiling bipartisan harmony in a time of war. The president lashed out again yesterday after returning to Washington from a two-week vacation at his Texas ranch.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 3, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Maryland's congressional delegation last night echoed President Bush's praise of Iraq's first election in a half-century and the need to provide security there, but then it split mostly along party lines over the domestic issues outlined in the State of the Union address. Democratic Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski said she was encouraged by Bush's words on Sunday's election. "We wish Iraq well," she said, but she quickly criticized the president's proposal to create private accounts within Social Security, which he said would be bankrupt by 2042.
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